Doubtnut Promotions Sticky

Assertion. Azolla pinnata is used as a biofertilizer in rice cultivation.
Reason. Azolla performs dinitrogen fixation with the help of symbotic bacterium Bacillus sp.

A

If both Assertion and Reason are true and the Reason is a correct explanation of the Assertion.

B

If both Assertion and Reason are true but Reason is not a correct explanation of the Assertion.

C

If Assertion is true but the Reason is false.

D

If both Assertion and Reason are false.

Video Solution
Doubtnut Promotions Banner
Text Solution
Verified by Experts

The correct Answer is:C

|
Answer

Step by step video, text & image solution for Assertion. Azolla pinnata is used as a biofertilizer in rice cultivation. Reason. Azolla performs dinitrogen fixation with the help of symbotic bacterium Bacillus sp. by Biology experts to help you in doubts & scoring excellent marks in Class 12 exams.

Updated on:21/07/2023

Related Playlists


Similar Practice Problems

  • Question 1 - Select One

    Assertion a : Azolla is used as biofertilzer in rice fields
    Reason r: Azolla contains nitrogen fixing cyanobacteria in its root nodules

    ABoth a and r true, but r is not correct explanation of a
    Ba is true but r is false
    Ca is false but r is true
    DBoth a and r are true and r is correct explanation of a
  • Question 1 - Select One

    Assertion : Biofortified crop is a source of higher protein, minerals and healthier fats.
    Reason : Azolla is biofertilizer.

    AIf both assertion and reason are true and reason is the correct explanation of assertion.
    BIf both assertion and reason are true but reason is not the correct explanation of assertion.
    CIf assertion is true but reason is false.
    DIf both assertion and reason are false.
  • Question 1 - Select One

    Assertion (A): The Green Revolution in the late 1980s introduced the Indian farmer to cultivation of wheat and rice using high yielding varieties (HYVs) of seeds.
    Reason (R): Compared to the traditional seeds, the HYV seeds promised to produce much greater amounts of grain on a single plant.

    ABoth A and Rare true and R is the correct explanation of A.
    BBoth A and R are true but is not the correct explanation of A.
    CA is true but R is false.
    DA is false but R is true.
  • Question 1 - Select One

    Which of the following organisms remains associated with compound leaf (frond) of Azolla pinnata (a fern) and perform symbiotic nitrogen fixation ?

    AAnabaena
    BAulosira
    COscillatoria
    DCylindrospermuma
  • Question 1 - Select One

    Nearly 6000 years ago, man took a giant step fonvard in his evolution on this earth when, giving up a nomadic type oflife, he took to agriculture. This memorable event happened in certain river valleys of India, China, Mesopotamia (modern Iraq) and Egypt. The reason was that the conditions in these areas were favourable for the cultivation of grains like wheat, rice etc because of plenty ofrich soil and water. Consequently, the farmer was able to produce more grains than he required for his needs. This helped in the development of settled cooperative living and. villages appeared where some people could make a living using some specialised skills or take up other jobs useful to the society instead of tilling the soil.
    As time passed more and more families started living together for the sake of security against barbarians and wild animals. They built big buildings and cities sprang up. Such developments took place in many parts of the world where conditions were suitable for agriculture, trade and commerce. Since it was not hard to make a good living, men had spare time for the development of arts and crafts and engage in other activities which characterise a cultured life.
    The ancient civilizations, though quite far removed from each other, did not develop in complete isolation. There was some trade and commerce accompanied at times by sharing of knowledge. It was not uncommon to have from time to time small or big wars and mass exodus of people for greener pastures. By 1000 BC, with considerable intermingling of races, several well-developed and prosperous civilisations had come into existence. Their borders of course were not well defined but kept on shifting due to wars. Here . we shall be concerned essentially with some of the fundamental contributions of the ancient Indian and Greek civilisations to human knowledge. One may like to know why these two could make more important and enduring contributions than other civilisations. The answer briefly is that by and large both in India and Greece · conditions for free, sober and intelligent thought were an integral part of the social structure. Furthermore, the philosophers were highly respected and they could without a care
    Follow knowledge like a sinking star
    Beyond the utmost bound of human thought.
    To begin with, the philosophical developments in the two civilisations started along similar lines, with attempts to answer some basic questions like. Who am I? How was the world created? Is there life after death? And so on. This is not surprising since the forefathers ofthe Indo-Aryans and the Greeks lived together in Central Asia before mass migration. But in due course, around 500 BC, the effects of different environments and some in termixin u with other races began to have their effect and change in emphasi, in the pursuit of knowledge was noticeable. The Greeks, because of their rugged surrounding and contacts with other-seafaring people in trade and commerce, had to be practical. They turned more and more to the study and understanding of the 'outer world'. So successful were they in their endeavour and so basic were their contributions that it is now quite generally accepted that the entire modern intellectual education of the West, both philosophical and scientific, originates from the Greeks. The Indo-Aryans, on the other hand, once they had settled down comfortably in different parts oflndia did not have to fiice many challenges from the outside world. Consequently, they turned more and more towards religion and the study of man's 'inner world'. The degree of success and the mastery they achieved is best summed up by Schopenhauer, a German philosopher. Commenting about Upanishidic knowledge, he remarked,
    "Thinking was finished on the banks ofriver Ganges."

    Which step of man marks the end of his life as wanderers on this earth?

    Ahis taking up of jobs which were useful to the society
    Bhis shift towards agricultural activities
    Cdevelopment-of the sense of brotherhood
    Devolution oftrade and commerce
  • Question 1 - Select One

    Nearly 6000 years ago, man took a giant step fonvard in his evolution on this earth when, giving up a nomadic type oflife, he took to agriculture. This memorable event happened in certain river valleys of India, China, Mesopotamia (modern Iraq) and Egypt. The reason was that the conditions in these areas were favourable for the cultivation of grains like wheat, rice etc because of plenty ofrich soil and water. Consequently, the farmer was able to produce more grains than he required for his needs. This helped in the development of settled cooperative living and. villages appeared where some people could make a living using some specialised skills or take up other jobs useful to the society instead of tilling the soil.
    As time passed more and more families started living together for the sake of security against barbarians and wild animals. They built big buildings and cities sprang up. Such developments took place in many parts of the world where conditions were suitable for agriculture, trade and commerce. Since it was not hard to make a good living, men had spare time for the development of arts and crafts and engage in other activities which characterise a cultured life.
    The ancient civilizations, though quite far removed from each other, did not develop in complete isolation. There was some trade and commerce accompanied at times by sharing of knowledge. It was not uncommon to have from time to time small or big wars and mass exodus of people for greener pastures. By 1000 BC, with considerable intermingling of races, several well-developed and prosperous civilisations had come into existence. Their borders of course were not well defined but kept on shifting due to wars. Here . we shall be concerned essentially with some of the fundamental contributions of the ancient Indian and Greek civilisations to human knowledge. One may like to know why these two could make more important and enduring contributions than other civilisations. The answer briefly is that by and large both in India and Greece · conditions for free, sober and intelligent thought were an integral part of the social structure. Furthermore, the philosophers were highly respected and they could without a care
    Follow knowledge like a sinking star
    Beyond the utmost bound of human thought.
    To begin with, the philosophical developments in the two civilisations started along similar lines, with attempts to answer some basic questions like. Who am I? How was the world created? Is there life after death? And so on. This is not surprising since the forefathers ofthe Indo-Aryans and the Greeks lived together in Central Asia before mass migration. But in due course, around 500 BC, the effects of different environments and some in termixin u with other races began to have their effect and change in emphasi, in the pursuit of knowledge was noticeable. The Greeks, because of their rugged surrounding and contacts with other-seafaring people in trade and commerce, had to be practical. They turned more and more to the study and understanding of the 'outer world'. So successful were they in their endeavour and so basic were their contributions that it is now quite generally accepted that the entire modern intellectual education of the West, both philosophical and scientific, originates from the Greeks. The Indo-Aryans, on the other hand, once they had settled down comfortably in different parts oflndia did not have to fiice many challenges from the outside world. Consequently, they turned more and more towards religion and the study of man's 'inner world'. The degree of success and the mastery they achieved is best summed up by Schopenhauer, a German philosopher. Commenting about Upanishidic knowledge, he remarked,
    "Thinking was finished on the banks ofriver Ganges."

    Development of villages became easy because

    Apeople gave up agriculture and took to alternate jobs.
    Ba sense of security led people to live in units like villages.
    Cpeople were fed up ofnomadic lifestyle.
    DNone of these
  • Question 1 - Select One

    Nearly 6000 years ago, man took a giant step fonvard in his evolution on this earth when, giving up a nomadic type oflife, he took to agriculture. This memorable event happened in certain river valleys of India, China, Mesopotamia (modern Iraq) and Egypt. The reason was that the conditions in these areas were favourable for the cultivation of grains like wheat, rice etc because of plenty ofrich soil and water. Consequently, the farmer was able to produce more grains than he required for his needs. This helped in the development of settled cooperative living and. villages appeared where some people could make a living using some specialised skills or take up other jobs useful to the society instead of tilling the soil.
    As time passed more and more families started living together for the sake of security against barbarians and wild animals. They built big buildings and cities sprang up. Such developments took place in many parts of the world where conditions were suitable for agriculture, trade and commerce. Since it was not hard to make a good living, men had spare time for the development of arts and crafts and engage in other activities which characterise a cultured life.
    The ancient civilizations, though quite far removed from each other, did not develop in complete isolation. There was some trade and commerce accompanied at times by sharing of knowledge. It was not uncommon to have from time to time small or big wars and mass exodus of people for greener pastures. By 1000 BC, with considerable intermingling of races, several well-developed and prosperous civilisations had come into existence. Their borders of course were not well defined but kept on shifting due to wars. Here . we shall be concerned essentially with some of the fundamental contributions of the ancient Indian and Greek civilisations to human knowledge. One may like to know why these two could make more important and enduring contributions than other civilisations. The answer briefly is that by and large both in India and Greece · conditions for free, sober and intelligent thought were an integral part of the social structure. Furthermore, the philosophers were highly respected and they could without a care
    Follow knowledge like a sinking star
    Beyond the utmost bound of human thought.
    To begin with, the philosophical developments in the two civilisations started along similar lines, with attempts to answer some basic questions like. Who am I? How was the world created? Is there life after death? And so on. This is not surprising since the forefathers ofthe Indo-Aryans and the Greeks lived together in Central Asia before mass migration. But in due course, around 500 BC, the effects of different environments and some in termixin u with other races began to have their effect and change in emphasi, in the pursuit of knowledge was noticeable. The Greeks, because of their rugged surrounding and contacts with other-seafaring people in trade and commerce, had to be practical. They turned more and more to the study and understanding of the 'outer world'. So successful were they in their endeavour and so basic were their contributions that it is now quite generally accepted that the entire modern intellectual education of the West, both philosophical and scientific, originates from the Greeks. The Indo-Aryans, on the other hand, once they had settled down comfortably in different parts oflndia did not have to fiice many challenges from the outside world. Consequently, they turned more and more towards religion and the study of man's 'inner world'. The degree of success and the mastery they achieved is best summed up by Schopenhauer, a German philosopher. Commenting about Upanishidic knowledge, he remarked,
    "Thinking was finished on the banks ofriver Ganges."

    Which of the following is true in the context of the passage?

    AAg riculture, trade and commerce marked the development of the society.
    BLiving together made people brave enough to kill the wild animals.
    CMan's nomadic lifestyle gave birth to agriculture
    DMan took up to nomadic lifestyle nearly 6000 years from now.

Similar Questions