Doubtnut Promotions Sticky

Assertion: Industrial fermentations are money making ventrues.
Reason They require a through research to discover high yields of produce at least possible expenses.

A

If both Assertion and Reason are true and the Reason is a correct explanation of the Assertion.

B

If both Assertion and Reason are true but Reason is not a correct explanation of the Assertion.

C

If Assertion is true but the Reason is false.

D

If both Assertion and Reason are false.

Video Solution
Doubtnut Promotions Banner
Text Solution
Verified by Experts

The correct Answer is:B

|
Answer

Step by step video, text & image solution for Assertion: Industrial fermentations are money making ventrues. Reason They require a through research to discover high yields of produce at least possible expenses. by Biology experts to help you in doubts & scoring excellent marks in Class 12 exams.

Updated on:21/07/2023

Related Playlists


Knowledge Check

  • Question 1 - Select One

    Assertion Industrial fermentiations are money making ventures
    Reason They require a thorough reasech to discover high yilds fo produce at least possible expenses

    AIf both Assertion and Reason are true and the Reason is a correct explanation of the Assertion
    BIf both Assertion and Reason are ture but Reason is not a correct explanation of the Assertion
    CIf Assertion is true but the Reason is false
    DIf both Assertion and Reason are false
  • Question 1 - Select One

    India is rushing headlong towards economic success and modernisation, counting on high-tech industries such as information technology and biotechnology to propel the nation to prosperity. India's recent announcement that it would no longer produce unlicensed inexpensive generic pharmaceuticals bowed to the realities of the World Trade Organisation while at the same time challenging the domestic drug industry to compete with the multinational firms. Unfortunately, its weak higher education sector constitutes the Achilles' heel of this strategy. Its systematic disinvestment in higher education in recent years has yielded· neither world-class research nor very many highly trained scholars, scientists or managers to sustain high-tech development.
    India's main competitors-especially China, but also Singapore, Taiwan, and South Korea-are investing in large and differentiated higher education systems. They are providing access to a large number of students at the bottom of the academic system while at the same time building some research-based universities that are able to compete with the world's best - mstitutions. The recent London Times Higher Education 'Supplement ranking of the world's top 200 universities included three in China, three in Hong Kong. three in South Korea, one in Taiwan, and. one in India. These countries are positioning themselves for leadership in the knowledge-based economies of the coming era.
    There was a time when countries could achieve economic success with cheap labour and low-tech manufacturing. Low wages still help, but contemporary large-scale development requires a sophisticated and at least partly knowledge-based economy. India has chosen that path, but will find a major stumbling block in its university system.
    India has significant advantages in the 21st century knowledge race. It has a large higher education sector-the third largest in the world in terms of number of students, after China and the Uniteo States. It uses English as a primary language of higher education and rescrch. It has a long academic tradition. Academic freedom is respected. There are a small number ofhigh- quality institutions, departments, and centres that can form the basis of quality sector in higher education. The fact that the States, rather than the Central Government, exercise major responsibility for higher education creates a rather cumbersome structure, but the system a.Hows for a variety of policies and approaches.
    Yet the weakness.es far outweigh th,e strengths. India educates approximately 10 per cent-of its young people in higher education compared to more than half in the major industrialised countries and 15 per cent in China. Almost all of the world's academic systems resemble a pyramid, with a small, high-qualiry tier at the top and a massive sector at the bottom. India has a ti ny top tier. None of its universities occupies a solid position at the top. A few of the best universities have some excellent derartmcnts and centres, and there are a small number of outstanding undergraduate colleges. The University Grants Commission's recent major support to five universities to build on their recognised strength is a step towards recognising a differentiatccl academic system and fostering excellence. These universities, combined, enrol well under one per cent of the student population.
    Which of the following is TRUE in the context of the passage?

    AThe top five universities in India educate more than 10 percent of the Indian student population.
    BIndia 's higher education sector is the largest in the world
    CIn the past, countries could progress economically through low manufacturing cost as well as low wages of labourers.
    DIndia has recently invested heavy sums in the higher education sector leading to world-class research :
  • Question 1 - Select One

    India is rushing headlong towards economic success and modernisation, counting on high-tech industries such as information technology and biotechnology to propel the nation to prosperity. India's recent announcement that it would no longer produce unlicensed inexpensive generic pharmaceuticals bowed to the realities of the World Trade Organisation while at the same time challenging the domestic drug industry to compete with the multinational firms. Unfortunately, its weak higher education sector constitutes the Achilles' heel of this strategy. Its systematic disinvestment in higher education in recent years has yielded· neither world-class research nor very many highly trained scholars, scientists or managers to sustain high-tech development.
    India's main competitors-especially China, but also Singapore, Taiwan, and South Korea-are investing in large and differentiated higher education systems. They are providing access to a large number of students at the bottom of the academic system while at the same time building some research-based universities that are able to compete with the world's best - mstitutions. The recent London Times Higher Education 'Supplement ranking of the world's top 200 universities included three in China, three in Hong Kong. three in South Korea, one in Taiwan, and. one in India. These countries are positioning themselves for leadership in the knowledge-based economies of the coming era.
    There was a time when countries could achieve economic success with cheap labour and low-tech manufacturing. Low wages still help, but contemporary large-scale development requires a sophisticated and at least partly knowledge-based economy. India has chosen that path, but will find a major stumbling block in its university system.
    India has significant advantages in the 21st century knowledge race. It has a large higher education sector-the third largest in the world in terms of number of students, after China and the Uniteo States. It uses English as a primary language of higher education and rescrch. It has a long academic tradition. Academic freedom is respected. There are a small number ofhigh- quality institutions, departments, and centres that can form the basis of quality sector in higher education. The fact that the States, rather than the Central Government, exercise major responsibility for higher education creates a rather cumbersome structure, but the system a.Hows for a variety of policies and approaches.
    Yet the weakness.es far outweigh th,e strengths. India educates approximately 10 per cent-of its young people in higher education compared to more than half in the major industrialised countries and 15 per cent in China. Almost all of the world's academic systems resemble a pyramid, with a small, high-qualiry tier at the top and a massive sector at the bottom. India has a ti ny top tier. None of its universities occupies a solid position at the top. A few of the best universities have some excellent derartmcnts and centres, and there are a small number of outstanding undergraduate colleges. The University Grants Commission's recent major support to five universities to build on their recognised strength is a step towards recognising a differentiatccl academic system and fostering excellence. These universities, combined, enrol well under one per cent of the student population.
    What did Inidan agree to do at the behest of the World Trade Organisation?

    AIt would stop manufacturing all types of pharmaceuticals.
    BIt woul d ask its domestic pharmaceutical companies to compete with the international ones.
    Cft would buy licensed drugs only from the USA.
    DIt wot! ld nut ma nufacture cheap common medicines without a ficence.
  • Question 1 - Select One

    India is rushing headlong towards economic success and modernisation, counting on high-tech industries such as information technology and biotechnology to propel the nation to prosperity. India's recent announcement that it would no longer produce unlicensed inexpensive generic pharmaceuticals bowed to the realities of the World Trade Organisation while at the same time challenging the domestic drug industry to compete with the multinational firms. Unfortunately, its weak higher education sector constitutes the Achilles' heel of this strategy. Its systematic disinvestment in higher education in recent years has yielded· neither world-class research nor very many highly trained scholars, scientists or managers to sustain high-tech development.
    India's main competitors-especially China, but also Singapore, Taiwan, and South Korea-are investing in large and differentiated higher education systems. They are providing access to a large number of students at the bottom of the academic system while at the same time building some research-based universities that are able to compete with the world's best - mstitutions. The recent London Times Higher Education 'Supplement ranking of the world's top 200 universities included three in China, three in Hong Kong. three in South Korea, one in Taiwan, and. one in India. These countries are positioning themselves for leadership in the knowledge-based economies of the coming era.
    There was a time when countries could achieve economic success with cheap labour and low-tech manufacturing. Low wages still help, but contemporary large-scale development requires a sophisticated and at least partly knowledge-based economy. India has chosen that path, but will find a major stumbling block in its university system.
    India has significant advantages in the 21st century knowledge race. It has a large higher education sector-the third largest in the world in terms of number of students, after China and the Uniteo States. It uses English as a primary language of higher education and rescrch. It has a long academic tradition. Academic freedom is respected. There are a small number ofhigh- quality institutions, departments, and centres that can form the basis of quality sector in higher education. The fact that the States, rather than the Central Government, exercise major responsibility for higher education creates a rather cumbersome structure, but the system a.Hows for a variety of policies and approaches.
    Yet the weakness.es far outweigh th,e strengths. India educates approximately 10 per cent-of its young people in higher education compared to more than half in the major industrialised countries and 15 per cent in China. Almost all of the world's academic systems resemble a pyramid, with a small, high-qualiry tier at the top and a massive sector at the bottom. India has a ti ny top tier. None of its universities occupies a solid position at the top. A few of the best universities have some excellent derartmcnts and centres, and there are a small number of outstanding undergraduate colleges. The University Grants Commission's recent major support to five universities to build on their recognised strength is a step towards recognising a differentiatccl academic system and fostering excellence. These universities, combined, enrol well under one per cent of the student population.
    RESEMBLE

    AAgainst
    BSimilar to
    CMirror
    DDiffer from
  • Question 1 - Select One

    India is rushing headlong towards economic success and modernisation, counting on high-tech industries such as information technology and biotechnology to propel the nation to prosperity. India's recent announcement that it would no longer produce unlicensed inexpensive generic pharmaceuticals bowed to the realities of the World Trade Organisation while at the same time challenging the domestic drug industry to compete with the multinational firms. Unfortunately, its weak higher education sector constitutes the Achilles' heel of this strategy. Its systematic disinvestment in higher education in recent years has yielded· neither world-class research nor very many highly trained scholars, scientists or managers to sustain high-tech development.
    India's main competitors-especially China, but also Singapore, Taiwan, and South Korea-are investing in large and differentiated higher education systems. They are providing access to a large number of students at the bottom of the academic system while at the same time building some research-based universities that are able to compete with the world's best - mstitutions. The recent London Times Higher Education 'Supplement ranking of the world's top 200 universities included three in China, three in Hong Kong. three in South Korea, one in Taiwan, and. one in India. These countries are positioning themselves for leadership in the knowledge-based economies of the coming era.
    There was a time when countries could achieve economic success with cheap labour and low-tech manufacturing. Low wages still help, but contemporary large-scale development requires a sophisticated and at least partly knowledge-based economy. India has chosen that path, but will find a major stumbling block in its university system.
    India has significant advantages in the 21st century knowledge race. It has a large higher education sector-the third largest in the world in terms of number of students, after China and the Uniteo States. It uses English as a primary language of higher education and rescrch. It has a long academic tradition. Academic freedom is respected. There are a small number ofhigh- quality institutions, departments, and centres that can form the basis of quality sector in higher education. The fact that the States, rather than the Central Government, exercise major responsibility for higher education creates a rather cumbersome structure, but the system a.Hows for a variety of policies and approaches.
    Yet the weakness.es far outweigh th,e strengths. India educates approximately 10 per cent-of its young people in higher education compared to more than half in the major industrialised countries and 15 per cent in China. Almost all of the world's academic systems resemble a pyramid, with a small, high-qualiry tier at the top and a massive sector at the bottom. India has a ti ny top tier. None of its universities occupies a solid position at the top. A few of the best universities have some excellent derartmcnts and centres, and there are a small number of outstanding undergraduate colleges. The University Grants Commission's recent major support to five universities to build on their recognised strength is a step towards recognising a differentiatccl academic system and fostering excellence. These universities, combined, enrol well under one per cent of the student population.
    Which of the following, according to the passage, is/are needed for the economic success of a country?
    (1) Cheap labour
    (2) Educated employees
    (3) Research institutions to cater to the needs ofdevelopment

    AOnly(l) and (2)
    BOnly (2)
    COnly (3)
    DOnly(2)and(3)
  • Question 1 - Select One

    India is rushing headlong towards economic success and modernisation, counting on high-tech industries such as information technology and biotechnology to propel the nation to prosperity. India's recent announcement that it would no longer produce unlicensed inexpensive generic pharmaceuticals bowed to the realities of the World Trade Organisation while at the same time challenging the domestic drug industry to compete with the multinational firms. Unfortunately, its weak higher education sector constitutes the Achilles' heel of this strategy. Its systematic disinvestment in higher education in recent years has yielded· neither world-class research nor very many highly trained scholars, scientists or managers to sustain high-tech development.
    India's main competitors-especially China, but also Singapore, Taiwan, and South Korea-are investing in large and differentiated higher education systems. They are providing access to a large number of students at the bottom of the academic system while at the same time building some research-based universities that are able to compete with the world's best - mstitutions. The recent London Times Higher Education 'Supplement ranking of the world's top 200 universities included three in China, three in Hong Kong. three in South Korea, one in Taiwan, and. one in India. These countries are positioning themselves for leadership in the knowledge-based economies of the coming era.
    There was a time when countries could achieve economic success with cheap labour and low-tech manufacturing. Low wages still help, but contemporary large-scale development requires a sophisticated and at least partly knowledge-based economy. India has chosen that path, but will find a major stumbling block in its university system.
    India has significant advantages in the 21st century knowledge race. It has a large higher education sector-the third largest in the world in terms of number of students, after China and the Uniteo States. It uses English as a primary language of higher education and rescrch. It has a long academic tradition. Academic freedom is respected. There are a small number ofhigh- quality institutions, departments, and centres that can form the basis of quality sector in higher education. The fact that the States, rather than the Central Government, exercise major responsibility for higher education creates a rather cumbersome structure, but the system a.Hows for a variety of policies and approaches.
    Yet the weakness.es far outweigh th,e strengths. India educates approximately 10 per cent-of its young people in higher education compared to more than half in the major industrialised countries and 15 per cent in China. Almost all of the world's academic systems resemble a pyramid, with a small, high-qualiry tier at the top and a massive sector at the bottom. India has a ti ny top tier. None of its universities occupies a solid position at the top. A few of the best universities have some excellent derartmcnts and centres, and there are a small number of outstanding undergraduate colleges. The University Grants Commission's recent major support to five universities to build on their recognised strength is a step towards recognising a differentiatccl academic system and fostering excellence. These universities, combined, enrol well under one per cent of the student population.
    Which of the following is/are India's weakness/es when it comes to higher education'?
    (1) lndian un iversities do not have the requisite teaching faculty to cater to the needs of the highe r education sector.
    (2) On ly five Indian universities occupy the top position very strongly in the academic pyramid when it comes to higher educati'on.
    (3) India has the least percentage of young popuiation taking to higher education as compared to the rest of the comparable countries.

    AOnly ( l ) and (2)
    BOnly (2)
    COnly (3)
    DOnly(l)and(3)
  • Question 1 - Select One

    India is rushing headlong towards economic success and modernisation, counting on high-tech industries such as information technology and biotechnology to propel the nation to prosperity. India's recent announcement that it would no longer produce unlicensed inexpensive generic pharmaceuticals bowed to the realities of the World Trade Organisation while at the same time challenging the domestic drug industry to compete with the multinational firms. Unfortunately, its weak higher education sector constitutes the Achilles' heel of this strategy. Its systematic disinvestment in higher education in recent years has yielded· neither world-class research nor very many highly trained scholars, scientists or managers to sustain high-tech development.
    India's main competitors-especially China, but also Singapore, Taiwan, and South Korea-are investing in large and differentiated higher education systems. They are providing access to a large number of students at the bottom of the academic system while at the same time building some research-based universities that are able to compete with the world's best - mstitutions. The recent London Times Higher Education 'Supplement ranking of the world's top 200 universities included three in China, three in Hong Kong. three in South Korea, one in Taiwan, and. one in India. These countries are positioning themselves for leadership in the knowledge-based economies of the coming era.
    There was a time when countries could achieve economic success with cheap labour and low-tech manufacturing. Low wages still help, but contemporary large-scale development requires a sophisticated and at least partly knowledge-based economy. India has chosen that path, but will find a major stumbling block in its university system.
    India has significant advantages in the 21st century knowledge race. It has a large higher education sector-the third largest in the world in terms of number of students, after China and the Uniteo States. It uses English as a primary language of higher education and rescrch. It has a long academic tradition. Academic freedom is respected. There are a small number ofhigh- quality institutions, departments, and centres that can form the basis of quality sector in higher education. The fact that the States, rather than the Central Government, exercise major responsibility for higher education creates a rather cumbersome structure, but the system a.Hows for a variety of policies and approaches.
    Yet the weakness.es far outweigh th,e strengths. India educates approximately 10 per cent-of its young people in higher education compared to more than half in the major industrialised countries and 15 per cent in China. Almost all of the world's academic systems resemble a pyramid, with a small, high-qualiry tier at the top and a massive sector at the bottom. India has a ti ny top tier. None of its universities occupies a solid position at the top. A few of the best universities have some excellent derartmcnts and centres, and there are a small number of outstanding undergraduate colleges. The University Grants Commission's recent major support to five universities to build on their recognised strength is a step towards recognising a differentiatccl academic system and fostering excellence. These universities, combined, enrol well under one per cent of the student population.
    DIFFERENTIATED

    ASimilar
    BVaried
    CHarmonized
    DSynchronized
  • Question 1 - Select One

    India is rushing headlong towards economic success and modernisation, counting on high-tech industries such as information technology and biotechnology to propel the nation to prosperity. India's recent announcement that it would no longer produce unlicensed inexpensive generic pharmaceuticals bowed to the realities of the World Trade Organisation while at the same time challenging the domestic drug industry to compete with the multinational firms. Unfortunately, its weak higher education sector constitutes the Achilles' heel of this strategy. Its systematic disinvestment in higher education in recent years has yielded· neither world-class research nor very many highly trained scholars, scientists or managers to sustain high-tech development.
    India's main competitors-especially China, but also Singapore, Taiwan, and South Korea-are investing in large and differentiated higher education systems. They are providing access to a large number of students at the bottom of the academic system while at the same time building some research-based universities that are able to compete with the world's best - mstitutions. The recent London Times Higher Education 'Supplement ranking of the world's top 200 universities included three in China, three in Hong Kong. three in South Korea, one in Taiwan, and. one in India. These countries are positioning themselves for leadership in the knowledge-based economies of the coming era.
    There was a time when countries could achieve economic success with cheap labour and low-tech manufacturing. Low wages still help, but contemporary large-scale development requires a sophisticated and at least partly knowledge-based economy. India has chosen that path, but will find a major stumbling block in its university system.
    India has significant advantages in the 21st century knowledge race. It has a large higher education sector-the third largest in the world in terms of number of students, after China and the Uniteo States. It uses English as a primary language of higher education and rescrch. It has a long academic tradition. Academic freedom is respected. There are a small number ofhigh- quality institutions, departments, and centres that can form the basis of quality sector in higher education. The fact that the States, rather than the Central Government, exercise major responsibility for higher education creates a rather cumbersome structure, but the system a.Hows for a variety of policies and approaches.
    Yet the weakness.es far outweigh th,e strengths. India educates approximately 10 per cent-of its young people in higher education compared to more than half in the major industrialised countries and 15 per cent in China. Almost all of the world's academic systems resemble a pyramid, with a small, high-qualiry tier at the top and a massive sector at the bottom. India has a ti ny top tier. None of its universities occupies a solid position at the top. A few of the best universities have some excellent derartmcnts and centres, and there are a small number of outstanding undergraduate colleges. The University Grants Commission's recent major support to five universities to build on their recognised strength is a step towards recognising a differentiatccl academic system and fostering excellence. These universities, combined, enrol well under one per cent of the student population.
    What does the phrase 'Achilles' heel' mean as used in the passage?.

    AWeakness
    BQuickness
    CLow quality
    DNimbleness
  • Question 1 - Select One

    India is rushing headlong towards economic success and modernisation, counting on high-tech industries such as information technology and biotechnology to propel the nation to prosperity. India's recent announcement that it would no longer produce unlicensed inexpensive generic pharmaceuticals bowed to the realities of the World Trade Organisation while at the same time challenging the domestic drug industry to compete with the multinational firms. Unfortunately, its weak higher education sector constitutes the Achilles' heel of this strategy. Its systematic disinvestment in higher education in recent years has yielded· neither world-class research nor very many highly trained scholars, scientists or managers to sustain high-tech development.
    India's main competitors-especially China, but also Singapore, Taiwan, and South Korea-are investing in large and differentiated higher education systems. They are providing access to a large number of students at the bottom of the academic system while at the same time building some research-based universities that are able to compete with the world's best - mstitutions. The recent London Times Higher Education 'Supplement ranking of the world's top 200 universities included three in China, three in Hong Kong. three in South Korea, one in Taiwan, and. one in India. These countries are positioning themselves for leadership in the knowledge-based economies of the coming era.
    There was a time when countries could achieve economic success with cheap labour and low-tech manufacturing. Low wages still help, but contemporary large-scale development requires a sophisticated and at least partly knowledge-based economy. India has chosen that path, but will find a major stumbling block in its university system.
    India has significant advantages in the 21st century knowledge race. It has a large higher education sector-the third largest in the world in terms of number of students, after China and the Uniteo States. It uses English as a primary language of higher education and rescrch. It has a long academic tradition. Academic freedom is respected. There are a small number ofhigh- quality institutions, departments, and centres that can form the basis of quality sector in higher education. The fact that the States, rather than the Central Government, exercise major responsibility for higher education creates a rather cumbersome structure, but the system a.Hows for a variety of policies and approaches.
    Yet the weakness.es far outweigh th,e strengths. India educates approximately 10 per cent-of its young people in higher education compared to more than half in the major industrialised countries and 15 per cent in China. Almost all of the world's academic systems resemble a pyramid, with a small, high-qualiry tier at the top and a massive sector at the bottom. India has a ti ny top tier. None of its universities occupies a solid position at the top. A few of the best universities have some excellent derartmcnts and centres, and there are a small number of outstanding undergraduate colleges. The University Grants Commission's recent major support to five universities to build on their recognised strength is a step towards recognising a differentiatccl academic system and fostering excellence. These universities, combined, enrol well under one per cent of the student population.
    STUMBLINGBLOCK

    AArgument
    BFrustration
    CAdvantage
    DHurdle

Similar Questions