Doubtnut Promotions Sticky

[A] : Endomycorrhiza of forest trees contribute to the efficient nutrient cycling in tropical test ecosystems .
[R] : The fungi that form endomycorrhizal association with plants store nutrient ions and make them available to the host plants .

A

If both A and R are true and R is the correct explanation of A

B

If both A and R are true but R is not the correct explanation of A

C

If A is true and R is false

D

If both A and R are false

Video Solution
Doubtnut Promotions Banner
|
Answer

Step by step video & image solution for [A] : Endomycorrhiza of forest trees contribute to the efficient nutrient cycling in tropical test ecosystems . [R] : The fungi that form endomycorrhizal association with plants store nutrient ions and make them available to the host plants . by Biology experts to help you in doubts & scoring excellent marks in Class 12 exams.

Updated on:21/07/2023

Related Playlists


Similar Practice Problems

  • Question 1 - Select One

    Assertion : Endomycorrhiza of forest trees contribute to the efficient nutrient cycling in tropical forest ecosystem.
    Reason : The fungi that form mycorrhizal associations with plants make nutrient ions available to them.

    Aif both are true with reason being correct explanation
    Bboth are true but reason is not correct explanation
    Cassertion is true but reason is wrong
    Dboth are wrong
  • Question 1 - Select One

    Read the given passage carefully and answer the questions that follow. Certain words are printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the these. The grassy forests of Bandipur, like many dry deciduous “forests” in south India, are not forests at all. The trees here are adapted to fire and the dry grasses fuel it frequently in the dry months between monsoons. These ecosystems are more open than closed canopy forests and the hardy vegetation found here can withstand drought conditions.
    Jayashree Ratnam, associate director of the wildlife biology and conservation programme at the National Centre for Biological Science, said that these forests are mesic savannas. “Having worked for a while in African savannas and being very familiar with the idea that mixed tree-grass ecosystems were distinctive from forests, when we returned to India and started visiting various field sites, we were struck by the similarities of these sites with African savannas,” she said.
    Mesic savannas receive more rainfall than some other iconic savannas of the tropics, but such ecosystems the world over are characterised by frequent burning and drought. India, however, has a blanket firesuppression policy in place and this is doing more harm than good to these tree-grass ecosystems, find a series of studies. “The more we worked and documented, the more we realised that viewing these ecosystems as forests resulted in a fundamental misunderstanding of their functional ecology, especially the roles of fire and herbivores in maintaining these ecosystems,” added Ratnam.
    Savannas are ecosystems having a continuous layer of grass along with a discontinuous tree canopy. However, this structural definition of a savanna doesn’t take into consideration other biological traits of individuals and communities, which provide clues about the evolution and functional ecology of this ecosystem. Savanna trees have a number of adaptations to live in a fire-driven ecosystem. Their large underground storage organs and roots contain much of their resources and fire cannot damage these stores. Saplings re-sprout quickly and grow rapidly. Adult trees have less dense canopies than forest species, allowing more sunlight to permeate to the ground level. Mature trees also have thick bark. A 2019 study found that on average, savanna tree species from peninsular India produced twice as much bark as evergreen forest trees.
    Historically, indigenous people in India used controlled burning as a way to manage their forests. The Soligas of Biligiri Rangaswamy Temple Wildlife Sanctuary, for example, would set fires early in the summer for a wide variety of reasons. Ground fires, they believe, kept hemiparasites at bay, and now, adult trees are falling prey to these organisms that depend on them in part for their survival. Soligas find that the invasive Lantana has spread, to the detriment of understorey plants and altering the structure of the forest significantly in the process. This spread of Lantana can have detrimental effects across trophic levels. “Allowing for periodic fires creates a mosaic of different densities of woody vegetation and also prevents the dominance of some weedy species such as Lantana camara. What we see now in most peninsular Indian “forests” is that fire has been totally banned and as a result Lantana has completely taken over the understorey. Since few herbivores eat the leaves of Lantana, this is going to reduce ungulate density and therefore negatively affect large carnivores such as the tiger,” said Abi T Vanak, an associate professor with the Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and the Environment.
    Which of the these presents a contrast to the following sentence as mentioned in paragraph 6:
    “Since few herbivores eat the leaves of Lantana, this is going to reduce ungulate density and therefore negatively affect large carnivores such as the tiger”

    ALantanas reduce food sources for carnivores.
    BLantanas cause habitat loss
    CExcess of Lantana will obstruct the field of vision of the carnivores.
    DHerbivores will be forced to migrate due to unavailability of food.
  • Question 1 - Select One

    Read the given passage carefully and answer the questions that follow. Certain words are printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the these.
    The grassy forests of Bandipur, like many dry deciduous “forests” in south India, are not forests at all. The trees here are adapted to fire and the dry grasses fuel it frequently in the dry months between monsoons. These ecosystems are more open than closed canopy forests and the hardy vegetation found here can withstand drought conditions.
    Jayashree Ratnam, associate director of the wildlife biology and conservation programme at the National Centre for Biological Science, said that these forests are mesic savannas. “Having worked for a while in African savannas and being very familiar with the idea that mixed treegrass ecosystems were distinctive from forests, when we returned to India and started visiting various field sites, we were struck by the similarities of these sites with African savannas,” she said.
    Mesic savannas receive more rainfall than some other iconic savannas of the tropics, but such ecosystems the world over are characterised by frequent burning and drought. India, however, has a blanket firesuppression policy in place and this is doing more harm than good to these tree-grass ecosystems, find a series of studies. “The more we worked and documented, the more we realised that viewing these ecosystems as forests resulted in a fundamental misunderstanding of their functional ecology, especially the roles of fire and herbivores in maintaining these ecosystems,” added Ratnam.
    Savannas are ecosystems having a continuous layer of grass along with a discontinuous tree canopy. However, this structural definition of a savanna doesn’t take into consideration other biological traits of individuals and communities, which provide clues about the evolution and functional ecology of this ecosystem. Savanna trees have a number of adaptations to live in a fire-driven ecosystem. Their large underground storage organs and roots contain much of their resources and fire cannot damage these stores. Saplings re-sprout quickly and grow rapidly. Adult trees have less dense canopies than forest species, allowing more sunlight to permeate to the ground level. Mature trees also have thick bark. A 2019 study found that on average, savanna tree species from peninsular India produced twice as much bark as evergreen forest trees.
    Historically, indigenous people in India used controlled burning as a way to manage their forests. The Soligas of Biligiri Rangaswamy Temple Wildlife Sanctuary, for example, would set fires early in the summer for a wide variety of reasons. Ground fires, they believe, kept hemiparasites at bay, and now, adult trees are falling prey to these organisms that depend on them in part for their survival. Soligas find that the invasive Lantana has spread, to the detriment of understorey plants and altering the structure of the forest significantly in the process. This spread of Lantana can have detrimental effects across trophic levels. “Allowing for periodic fires creates a mosaic of different densities of woody vegetation and also prevents the dominance of some weedy species such as Lantana camara. What we see now in most peninsular Indian “forests” is that fire has been totally banned and as a result Lantana has completely taken over the understorey. Since few herbivores eat the leaves of Lantana, this is going to reduce ungulate density and therefore negatively affect large carnivores such as the tiger,” said Abi T Vanak, an associate professor with the Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and the Environment.
    Which of the following is/are correctly inferred from the given passage?
    I. In a forest, the plants do not have distinctive roles.
    II. Presence of rainfall is often a sign of lack of forest fires.
    III. In order to protect its forests, India must let them burn.

    AOnly I
    BOnly III
    CBoth II & III
    DBoth I & II
  • Question 1 - Select One

    The question below consists of a set of labelled sentences. These sentences, when properly sequenced form a coherent paragraph. Select the most logical order of sentences from among the options.
    P: Forests make for beautiful natural landscapes and scenery.
    Q: They offer visitors and tourists the beauty of trees and plants of all kinds and a large variety of wildlife that inhabits the area.
    R: Forests are a treasure house of nature.
    S: People enjoy going into the forests either on foot or on a safari.

    AQPRS
    BQPSR
    CPSQR
    DQRPS
  • Question 1 - Select One

    The questions below consist of a set of labelled sentences. These sentences, when properly sequenced form a coherent paragraph. Select the most logical order of sentences from among the options.
    P: Forests make for beautiful natural landscapes and scenery.
    Q: They offer visitors and tourists the beauty of trees and plants of all kinds and a large variety of wildlife that inhabits the area.
    R: Forests are a treasure house of nature.
    S: People enjoy going into the forests either on foot or on a safari.

    AQPRS
    BQPSR
    CPSOR
    DQRPS
  • Question 1 - Select One

    Read the given passage carefully and answer the questions that follow. Certain words are printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the these.
    The grassy forests of Bandipur, like many dry deciduous “forests” in south India, are not forests at all. The trees here are adapted to fire and the dry grasses fuel it frequently in the dry months between monsoons. These ecosystems are more open than closed canopy forests and the hardy vegetation found here can withstand drought conditions.
    Jayashree Ratnam, associate director of the wildlife biology and conservation programme at the National Centre for Biological Science, said that these forests are mesic savannas. “Having worked for a while in African savannas and being very familiar with the idea that mixed treegrass ecosystems were distinctive from forests, when we returned to India and started visiting various field sites, we were struck by the similarities of these sites with African savannas,” she said.
    Mesic savannas receive more rainfall than some other iconic savannas of the tropics, but such ecosystems the world over are characterised by frequent burning and drought. India, however, has a blanket firesuppression policy in place and this is doing more harm than good to these tree-grass ecosystems, find a series of studies. “The more we worked and documented, the more we realised that viewing these ecosystems as forests resulted in a fundamental misunderstanding of their functional ecology, especially the roles of fire and herbivores in maintaining these ecosystems,” added Ratnam.
    Savannas are ecosystems having a continuous layer of grass along with a discontinuous tree canopy. However, this structural definition of a savanna doesn’t take into consideration other biological traits of individuals and communities, which provide clues about the evolution and functional ecology of this ecosystem. Savanna trees have a number of adaptations to live in a fire-driven ecosystem. Their large underground storage organs and roots contain much of their resources and fire cannot damage these stores. Saplings re-sprout quickly and grow rapidly. Adult trees have less dense canopies than forest species, allowing more sunlight to permeate to the ground level. Mature trees also have thick bark. A 2019 study found that on average, savanna tree species from peninsular India produced twice as much bark as evergreen forest trees.
    Historically, indigenous people in India used controlled burning as a way to manage their forests. The Soligas of Biligiri Rangaswamy Temple Wildlife Sanctuary, for example, would set fires early in the summer for a wide variety of reasons. Ground fires, they believe, kept hemiparasites at bay, and now, adult trees are falling prey to these organisms that depend on them in part for their survival. Soligas find that the invasive Lantana has spread, to the detriment of understorey plants and altering the structure of the forest significantly in the process. This spread of Lantana can have detrimental effects across trophic levels. “Allowing for periodic fires creates a mosaic of different densities of woody vegetation and also prevents the dominance of some weedy species such as Lantana camara. What we see now in most peninsular Indian “forests” is that fire has been totally banned and as a result Lantana has completely taken over the understorey. Since few herbivores eat the leaves of Lantana, this is going to reduce ungulate density and therefore negatively affect large carnivores such as the tiger,” said Abi T Vanak, an associate professor with the Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and the Environment.
    Which of the following is not an assumption that supports the arguments presented in the first paragraph?

    AForest fires usually occur where there is little to no moisture in the air.
    BGrassy forests are common in southern India.
    CDeciduous forests are immune to fire.
    DDeciduous trees do not obstruct the sunlight from reaching the ground.
  • Question 1 - Select One

    Read the given passage carefully and answer the questions that follow. Certain words are printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the these.
    The grassy forests of Bandipur, like many dry deciduous “forests” in south India, are not forests at all. The trees here are adapted to fire and the dry grasses fuel it frequently in the dry months between monsoons. These ecosystems are more open than closed canopy forests and the hardy vegetation found here can withstand drought conditions.
    Jayashree Ratnam, associate director of the wildlife biology and conservation programme at the National Centre for Biological Science, said that these forests are mesic savannas. “Having worked for a while in African savannas and being very familiar with the idea that mixed treegrass ecosystems were distinctive from forests, when we returned to India and started visiting various field sites, we were struck by the similarities of these sites with African savannas,” she said.
    Mesic savannas receive more rainfall than some other iconic savannas of the tropics, but such ecosystems the world over are characterised by frequent burning and drought. India, however, has a blanket firesuppression policy in place and this is doing more harm than good to these tree-grass ecosystems, find a series of studies. “The more we worked and documented, the more we realised that viewing these ecosystems as forests resulted in a fundamental misunderstanding of their functional ecology, especially the roles of fire and herbivores in maintaining these ecosystems,” added Ratnam.
    Savannas are ecosystems having a continuous layer of grass along with a discontinuous tree canopy. However, this structural definition of a savanna doesn’t take into consideration other biological traits of individuals and communities, which provide clues about the evolution and functional ecology of this ecosystem. Savanna trees have a number of adaptations to live in a fire-driven ecosystem. Their large underground storage organs and roots contain much of their resources and fire cannot damage these stores. Saplings re-sprout quickly and grow rapidly. Adult trees have less dense canopies than forest species, allowing more sunlight to permeate to the ground level. Mature trees also have thick bark. A 2019 study found that on average, savanna tree species from peninsular India produced twice as much bark as evergreen forest trees.
    Historically, indigenous people in India used controlled burning as a way to manage their forests. The Soligas of Biligiri Rangaswamy Temple Wildlife Sanctuary, for example, would set fires early in the summer for a wide variety of reasons. Ground fires, they believe, kept hemiparasites at bay, and now, adult trees are falling prey to these organisms that depend on them in part for their survival. Soligas find that the invasive Lantana has spread, to the detriment of understorey plants and altering the structure of the forest significantly in the process. This spread of Lantana can have detrimental effects across trophic levels. “Allowing for periodic fires creates a mosaic of different densities of woody vegetation and also prevents the dominance of some weedy species such as Lantana camara. What we see now in most peninsular Indian “forests” is that fire has been totally banned and as a result Lantana has completely taken over the understorey. Since few herbivores eat the leaves of Lantana, this is going to reduce ungulate density and therefore negatively affect large carnivores such as the tiger,” said Abi T Vanak, an associate professor with the Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and the Environment.
    Which of the following statement (s) is/are NOT TRUE in accordance with the information provided in the passage?
    I. There is a bigger market for deciduous forest trees than evergreen forest trees.
    II. Uncontrolled growth of hemiparasites has caused a reduction of canopy.
    III. The indigenous people were not consulted while making the forests of India.

    AOnly I
    BOnly III
    CBoth II & III
    DBoth I & II
  • Question 1 - Select One

    Read the given passage carefully and answer the questions that follow. Certain words are printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the these.
    The grassy forests of Bandipur, like many dry deciduous “forests” in south India, are not forests at all. The trees here are adapted to fire and the dry grasses fuel it frequently in the dry months between monsoons. These ecosystems are more open than closed canopy forests and the hardy vegetation found here can withstand drought conditions.
    Jayashree Ratnam, associate director of the wildlife biology and conservation programme at the National Centre for Biological Science, said that these forests are mesic savannas. “Having worked for a while in African savannas and being very familiar with the idea that mixed treegrass ecosystems were distinctive from forests, when we returned to India and started visiting various field sites, we were struck by the similarities of these sites with African savannas,” she said.
    Mesic savannas receive more rainfall than some other iconic savannas of the tropics, but such ecosystems the world over are characterised by frequent burning and drought. India, however, has a blanket firesuppression policy in place and this is doing more harm than good to these tree-grass ecosystems, find a series of studies. “The more we worked and documented, the more we realised that viewing these ecosystems as forests resulted in a fundamental misunderstanding of their functional ecology, especially the roles of fire and herbivores in maintaining these ecosystems,” added Ratnam.
    Savannas are ecosystems having a continuous layer of grass along with a discontinuous tree canopy. However, this structural definition of a savanna doesn’t take into consideration other biological traits of individuals and communities, which provide clues about the evolution and functional ecology of this ecosystem. Savanna trees have a number of adaptations to live in a fire-driven ecosystem. Their large underground storage organs and roots contain much of their resources and fire cannot damage these stores. Saplings re-sprout quickly and grow rapidly. Adult trees have less dense canopies than forest species, allowing more sunlight to permeate to the ground level. Mature trees also have thick bark. A 2019 study found that on average, savanna tree species from peninsular India produced twice as much bark as evergreen forest trees.
    Historically, indigenous people in India used controlled burning as a way to manage their forests. The Soligas of Biligiri Rangaswamy Temple Wildlife Sanctuary, for example, would set fires early in the summer for a wide variety of reasons. Ground fires, they believe, kept hemiparasites at bay, and now, adult trees are falling prey to these organisms that depend on them in part for their survival. Soligas find that the invasive Lantana has spread, to the detriment of understorey plants and altering the structure of the forest significantly in the process. This spread of Lantana can have detrimental effects across trophic levels. “Allowing for periodic fires creates a mosaic of different densities of woody vegetation and also prevents the dominance of some weedy species such as Lantana camara. What we see now in most peninsular Indian “forests” is that fire has been totally banned and as a result Lantana has completely taken over the understorey. Since few herbivores eat the leaves of Lantana, this is going to reduce ungulate density and therefore negatively affect large carnivores such as the tiger,” said Abi T Vanak, an associate professor with the Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and the Environment.
    Which of the following statements is true about Savannas with reference to the given passage?

    AThey are usually incapable of holding moisture
    BTheir adaptation in a fire-driven ecosystem includes increased immunity to forest fires.
    CThe understorey in savannas rely on constant sunlight.
    DAll A, B & C
  • Question 1 - Select One

    Read the given passage carefully and answer the questions that follow. Certain words are printed in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the these. The grassy forests of Bandipur, like many dry deciduous “forests” in south India, are not forests at all. The trees here are adapted to fire and the dry grasses fuel it frequently in the dry months between monsoons. These ecosystems are more open than closed canopy forests and the hardy vegetation found here can withstand drought conditions.
    Jayashree Ratnam, associate director of the wildlife biology and conservation programme at the National Centre for Biological Science, said that these forests are mesic savannas. “Having worked for a while in African savannas and being very familiar with the idea that mixed treegrass ecosystems were distinctive from forests, when we returned to India and started visiting various field sites, we were struck by the similarities of these sites with African savannas,” she said.
    Mesic savannas receive more rainfall than some other iconic savannas of the tropics, but such ecosystems the world over are characterised by frequent burning and drought. India, however, has a blanket firesuppression policy in place and this is doing more harm than good to these tree-grass ecosystems, find a series of studies. “The more we worked and documented, the more we realised that viewing these ecosystems as forests resulted in a fundamental misunderstanding of their functional ecology, especially the roles of fire and herbivores in maintaining these ecosystems,” added Ratnam.
    Savannas are ecosystems having a continuous layer of grass along with a discontinuous tree canopy. However, this structural definition of a savanna doesn’t take into consideration other biological traits of individuals and communities, which provide clues about the evolution and functional ecology of this ecosystem. Savanna trees have a number of adaptations to live in a fire-driven ecosystem. Their large underground storage organs and roots contain much of their resources and fire cannot damage these stores. Saplings re-sprout quickly and grow rapidly. Adult trees have less dense canopies than forest species, allowing more sunlight to permeate to the ground level. Mature trees also have thick bark. A 2019 study found that on average, savanna tree species from peninsular India produced twice as much bark as evergreen forest trees.
    Historically, indigenous people in India used controlled burning as a way to manage their forests. The Soligas of Biligiri Rangaswamy Temple Wildlife Sanctuary, for example, would set fires early in the summer for a wide variety of reasons. Ground fires, they believe, kept hemiparasites at bay, and now, adult trees are falling prey to these organisms that depend on them in part for their survival. Soligas find that the invasive Lantana has spread, to the detriment of understorey plants and altering the structure of the forest significantly in the process. This spread of Lantana can have detrimental effects across trophic levels. “Allowing for periodic fires creates a mosaic of different densities of woody vegetation and also prevents the dominance of some weedy species such as Lantana camara. What we see now in most peninsular Indian “forests” is that fire has been totally banned and as a result Lantana has completely taken over the understorey. Since few herbivores eat the leaves of Lantana, this is going to reduce ungulate density and therefore negatively affect large carnivores such as the tiger,” said Abi T Vanak, an associate professor with the Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and the Environment.
    Which of the following is one of the major reasons why the author is concerned about spread of Lantana?

    ALantanas prevent the growth of new understorey plants.
    BLantanas are better adapted to a fire-driven ecosystem than understorey plants.
    CLantanas prevent over hunting by large carnivores.
    DTheir parasitic nature makes them inedible for herbivores

Similar Questions