Doubtnut Promotions Sticky

METALS AND NON-METALS for Class 10 CHEMISTRY

INTRODUCTION

There are approximately 115 chemical elements known at present. There are similarities as well as differences in the properties of these elements. On the basis of their properties, all the elements can be divided into two main groups : metals and non-metals. Both metals as well as non-metals are used in our daily life. We also use a large number of compounds of metals and non-metals. In order to understand metals and non-metals, first we have to know new terms such as malleable, ductile and brittle. Malleable means which can be beaten with a hammer to form thin sheets (without breaking). Ductile means which can be stretched (or drawn) to form thin wires. And brittle means which breaks into pieces on hammering or stretching.

Basic terms used for Metals & Non-metals

Ab tak approximately 115 chemical elements hume pata hai aur inn elements ki properties meh kuch similarities aur differences hote hai, jiske basis par hum inn elements ko 2 main groups meh divide kar sakte hai - Metals and Non-metals. Metals aur non-metals ko hum apni daily life meh use karte hai aur iske sath metals aur non-metals se hum different compounds bhi form karte hai. So, metals aur non-metals kya hote hai ? Inhe padhne se pehle hum yahan kuch terms ke baare meh padhte hai jaise malleable, ductile, brittle. So jab hum kisi material ko hammer se beat karne par usse thin sheets meh bina toote convert karte hai tab usse hum malleable bolte hai. Similarly, jab hum kisi material ko stretch kar usse thin wires meh convert karte hai tab usse hum ductile bolte hai aur jab hum kisi material ko hammering or stretching se pieces meh convert karte hai tab usse hum brittle bolte hai. Ab inn points ko dhyan meh rakhte hue hum metals aur non-metals ko define kar sakte hai.

Metals

Sabse pehle metals wo elements hote hai jo heat aur electricity conduct karte hai aur ye malleable aur ductile hote hai. Metals generally lustrous (shiny), hard, strong, heavy aur sonorous (jisko jab hum hit karte hai tab wo ringing sound produce karte hai) hote hai. For example - Iron, Aluminium, Copper, Silver, Gold, Platinum etc.,

ocr_image
Figure : Iron, Copper, Silver, Gold are some of the metals


Jitne bhi hume elements known hai usme se maximum solid metals hote hai except mercury jo liquid metal hota hai.
Chemical reaction meh metals electrons loose kar positive ions form karte hai. Iss observation ke basis par hum kah sakte hai - Metals wo elements (except hydrogen) hote hai jo apne electrons loose (donate) kar positive ions form kar sakte hai. For example aluminium metal electrons loose kar aluminium ions (Al3+) form kar sakta hai. Iss wajah se metals ko hum electropositive elements bolte hai kyunki ye electrons loose kar positive ions generate karte hai.
Metals ko hum apni daily life meh cooking utensils, electric fans, sewing machines, cars, buses, trucks, trains, ships, aeroplanes form karne meh use karte hai aur kahin baar iske liye hum mixture of metals jinhe hum alloys bolte hai unhe use karte hai. Iske basis par hum kah sakte hai ki metals kisi bhi country ki National economy ke liye bahut important source hai.

Ab sabhi metals meh aluminium metal earth’s crust meh most abundant hota hai jiska earth crust’s meh 7 % amount hota hai. Similarly earth crust’s meh second most abundant metal iron hota hai jiska earth crust’s meh 4 % amount hota hai. Ab agar hum major metals ko earth’s crust meh unke abundance ke decreasing order meh arrange kare tab hamare paas following order hota hai - Aluminium, Iron, Calcium, Sodium, Potassium, and Magnesium.

Metals

Metals are the elements that conduct heat and electricity, and are malleable and ductile. Metals are also lustrous (shiny), hard, strong, heavy and sonorous (which make ringing sound when struck). Some of the examples of metals are : Iron, Aluminium, Copper, Silver, Gold, Platinum etc.,

ocr_image
Figure : Iron, Copper, Silver, Gold are some of the metals


A majority of the known elements are metals. All the metals are solids, except mercury which is a liquid metal.
During chemical reactions, metals can form positive ions by losing electrons. Based on this observation, we can write another definition of metals as follows : Metals are the elements (except hydrogen) which form positive ions by losing electrons (or donating electrons). For example, Aluminium (Al) is a metal which forms positively charged aluminium ions (Al+3) by losing electrons. In fact, metals are known as electropositive elements because they can form positive ions by losing electrons. Metals are widely used in our daily life like cooking utensils, electric fans, sewing machines, cars, buses, trucks, trains, ships and aeroplanes are all made of metals or mixtures of metals called alloys. Metals are very important for the National economy of every country.

The most abundant metal in the earth's crust is aluminium, which constitutes about 7% of the earth's crust. The second most abundant metal in the earth's crust is iron, which constitutes about 4% of the earth's crust. The major metals in the earth's crust in the decreasing order of their abundance are : Aluminium, Iron, Calcium, Sodium, Potassium and Magnesium.

Non-Metals

Non-metals wo elements hote hai jo heat aur electricity conduct nahi karte, iske sath ye malleable aur ductile bhi nahi hote. Ye commonly brittle hote hai. Non-metals generally lustrous nahi hote, matlab inka dull appearance hota hai aur ye soft nature, light, non-sonorous substance hote hai aur ye strong bhi nahi hote. For example Carbon, Sulphur, Phosphorus, Silicon, Hydrogen, Chlorine etc.,

ocr_image
Figure : Carbon, Sulphur and Chlorine are some of the non-metals


Ab carbon element ki jo 2 allotropic forms hoti hai - diamond aur graphite ye bhi non-metals hoti hai. Overall 22 non-metals meh - 10 non-metals solid, 1 non-metal (bromine at room temperature) liquid aur baki ke 11 non-metals gases hote hai.
Chemical reaction meh non-metals electrons gain kar negative ions form karte hai. Iss observation ke basis par hum kah sakte hai - Non-metals wo elements hote hai jo electrons gain (accept) kar negative ions form karte hai. For example oxygen non-metal electrons gain kar oxide ions (O2) form kar sakta hai. Iss wajah se non-metals ko hum electronegative elements bolte hai kyunki ye electrons gain kar negative ions form karte hai.
Non-metals meh hydrogen ek exception case hai jisme ye electrons loose kar hydrogen ions (H+) form karta hai.
Metals ki tarah non-metals ko bhi hum apni daily life meh use karte hai. For example carbon element ek important non-metal hai kyunki earth par life carbon compounds par depend karti hai jisme carbon compounds jaise proteins, fats, carbohydrates, vitamins, aur enzymes etc., living organism ki growth aur development ke liye important hote hai. Similarly non-metal oxygen bhi living organism ke liye zaruri hota hai kyunki air meh oxygen gas present hoti hai jo breathing ke liye essential hai aur iske sath oxygen gas combustion ke liye bhi zaruri hoti hai. Nitrogen ek inert gas hoti hai jiski air meh presence rate of combustion ko reduce karta hai.

Ab sabhi non-metals meh oxygen earth crust’s meh most abundant hota hai jiska earth crust’s meh 50 % amount hai. Similarly earth crust’s meh second most abundant non-metal silicon hota hai jiska earth crust’s meh 26 % amount hota hai. Agar hum major non-metals ko earth’s crust meh unke abundance ke decreasing order meh arrange kare tab inka following order hota hai - Oxygen, Silicon, Phosphorus, aur Sulphur.

Non-Metals

Non-metals are the elements that do not conduct heat and electricity, and are neither malleable nor ductile. They are brittle. Non-metals are not lustrous (not shiny), they have a dull appearance. Non-metals are generally soft, and not strong. They are light substances and non-sonorous (which do not make ringing sound when struck). Some of the examples of non-metals are : Carbon, Sulphur, Phosphorus, Silicon, Hydrogen, Chlorine etc.,

ocr_image
Figure : Carbon, Sulphur, Hydrogen and Chlorine are some of the non-metals


The two allotropic forms of carbon element, diamond and graphite, are also non-metals. In fact, there are 22 non-metals (or non-metallic elements). Out of these, 10 non-metals are solids, 1 non-metal (bromine at room temperature) is a liquid whereas the remaining 11 non-metals are gases.
During chemical reactions, non-metals can form negative ions by gaining electrons. Based on this observation, we can write another definition of non-metals as follows : Non-metals are the elements which form negative ions by gaining electrons (or accepting electrons). For example, oxygen (O) is a non-metal which forms negatively charged oxide ions (O2) by gaining electrons. In fact, non-metals are known as electronegative elements because they can form negative ions by gaining electrons. There is, however, an exception. Hydrogen (H) is the only non-metal element which loses electrons to form positive ions, hydrogen ions (H+).
Like metals, non-metals also play a very important role in living organism’s lives. For example, carbon is one of the most important non-metals because all the life on this earth is based on carbon compounds. This is because the carbon compounds like proteins, fats, carbohydrates, vitamins and enzymes, etc., are essential for the growth and development of living organisms. Another non-metal oxygen is equally important for the existence of life. This is because the presence of oxygen gas in the air is essential for breathing to maintain life. It is also necessary for the combustion (or burning) of fuels. Nitrogen is an inert gaseous non-metal whose presence in air reduces the rate of combustion.

The most abundant non-metal in the earth's crust is oxygen, which constitutes about 50% of the earth's crust. The second most abundant non-metal in the earth's crust is silicon, which constitutes about 26% of the earth's crust. The major non-metals in the earth's crust in the decreasing order of their abundance are: Oxygen, Silicon, Phosphorus and Sulphur.

Physical Properties of Metals

Ab hum metals ki physical properties ko yahan discuss karenge :

1) Metals are Malleable, that is, Metals can be beaten into Thin Sheets with a Hammer (without breaking)
Jab hum aluminium metal ke small piece ko hammer se beat karte hai tab aluminium metal bina break hue thin sheet meh convert ho jata hai. Jiske according hum kah sakte hai ki aluminium, metal hai jo malleability property show kar sakta hai. Malleability metals ki characteristics property hoti hai matlab most metals malleable hote hai jisme Gold, Silver, Aluminium, Copper highly malleable metals hote hai. Inn sabhi metals ko hammer se beat karne par hum inhe thin sheets meh convert kar sakte hai jinko hum foils bolte hai. Ab silver metal foils ko hum sweet decoration meh use karte hai. Similarly aluminium metal foils ko hum food items jaise biscuits, chocolates, medicines etc., packaging ke liye use karte hai. Iske sath aluminium sheets ko hum cooking utensils making meh bhi use karte hai. Copper metal bhi highly malleable hota hai iss wajah se isko bhi hum utensils aur dusre containers making ke liye use karte hai. Similarly, iron sheets ko hum boxes, buckets, drums, water tanks etc., making ke liye use karte hai.

ocr_image
Figure : Metals can be beaten into thin sheets with a hammer. They are malleable.


2) Metals are Ductile, that is, Metals can be drawn (or stretched) into Thin Wires
Ab kuch metals jaise copper, aluminium, magnesium aur iron hume wires ki form meh available hote hai aur metals agar thin wires ki form meh available hai tab iss property ko hum ductility bolte hai. Ductility bhi metals ki ek important characteristics property hoti hai matlab most metals ductile hote hai. Lekin sabhi metals equally ductile nahi hote. Sabhi metals meh Gold metal most ductile hota hai for example sirf 1 g Gold ko hum 2 km long thin wire meh convert kar sakte hai. Similarly, silver best ductile metal hota hai aur iske sath aluminium aur copper metals bhi ductile hote hai aur inko hum electric wire ke liye use karte hai. Inki tarah iron, magnesium, tungsten metals bhi ductile hote hai aur inme iron wires ko hum wire gauze making ke liye use karte hai aur tungsten wires ko hum electric bulbs filaments making ke liye use karte hai aur magnesium wires ko hum laboratory meh science experiments ke liye use karte hai.
ocr_image
Figure : Metals can be drawn (or stretched) into thin wires. They are ductile.


3) Metals are Good Conductors of Heat
Metals good conductor of heat hote hai matlab metals se heat easily pass karti hai. Isko samjhne ke liye hum ek experiment consider karte hai :
(i) Sabse pehle hum ek aluminium rod ko clamp se join karte, then iss rod par kuch iron nails ko wax ki help se fix karte hai.
(ii) Iske baad hum aluminium rod ke free end (left) ko burner se heat karte hai - tab hum kya dekhte hai ki jo iron nails rod par lagi hui thi wo girne lagti hai. Isme jo iron nails burner ke jitne paas hai (left) wo pehle girti hai aur jo iron nails clamp (right) ke paas hai wo last meh girti hai.
(iii) So jab humne aluminium rod ke left side ko heat kiya toh pehle left side wali iron nails giri aur uske baad right side wali iron nails niche giri, iska matlab heat yahan heater (left) to colder (right) side move kar rahi hai jo further wax ko melt kar iron nails ko niche girati hai. Iske according hum yahan ye kah sakte hai ki aluminium metal rod heat ko conduct karti hai.
ocr_image
Figure : Experiment to show that a Metal (here aluminium) Conducts Heat


Ab metals generally good conductors of heat hote hai (also called thermal conductivity). Sabhi metals meh Silver best conductor of heat hota hai, kyunki iski highest thermal conductivity hoti hai. Copper aur aluminium metal bhi good conductor of heat hote hai - iss wajah se inko hum cooking utensils aur water boilers etc., making ke liye use karte hai. Metals meh poor conductor of heat Lead aur Mercury metals hote hai. Ab hum discuss karte hai ki metal heat conduct kaise karte hai - so, jab hum metal ko heat karte hai tab inke atoms energy gain kar more vigorously vibrate karte hai. Then ye energy atoms meh present electrons meh transfer hoti hai, further ye electrons metal meh move karte hai. Ab jab ye energetic electrons metal meh move karte hai tab ye apni energy dusre electrons aur dusre atoms of metal meh transfer karte hai. Iske according heat metal ke ek end se dusre end meh conduct hoti hai aur iss wajah se heat conductivity bhi metals ki characteristics property hoti hai.
ocr_image
Figure : Metals conduct heat well. That is why this frying pan is made of a metal


4) Metals are Good Conductors of Electricity
Metals good conductors of electricity hote hai matlab metals meh electricity easily pass karti hai. Isko samjhne ke liye hum ek experiment consider karte hai :
(i) Sabse pehle hum electric circuit set up ke liye dry cell, torch bulb connected with holder aur crocodile clips consider karte hai aur inn sabko hum connecting wires se join karte hai as shown in (fig.a). Ab (fig.a) ko agar hum consider kare toh isme crocodile clips A aur B ke beech gap hai matlab ye circuit incomplete hai jis wajah se isme current flow nahi karega, accordingly we can say yahan bulb bhi glow nahi karega.
(ii) Ab agar hum iss gap meh piece of aluminium foil ko insert kare, tab yahan bulb glow karta hai. Iska matlab yahan aluminium foil electric current passing ko allow karta hai. Jo yahan ye show karta hai ki aluminium metal electric current conduct karta hai. In other words, aluminium metal good conductor of electricity hota hai. Iske sath iss circuit meh jo connecting wires hai wo copper metal se form hoti hai aur copper metal bhi electricity conduct karta hai kyunki copper metal bhi ek good conductor of electricity hota hai.
ocr_image
Figure : Experiment to show that a metal (here aluminium) conducts electricity


So basically most metals electricity ke good conductors hote hai kyunki inme electrical resistance kam hota hai. Sabhi metals meh Silver metal best conductor of electricity hota hai. Iske baad copper metal followed by gold, aluminium, tungsten metals aate hai. Copper aur aluminium ki high conductivity ki wajah se hum inko electric wires making ke liye use karte hai. Lekin iron aur mercury metal high electrical resistance show karte hai iss wajah se ye metals poor conductor of electricity hote hai. Ab hum discuss karte hai ki metals electricity conduct kaise karte hai. Generally metals good conductor of electricity hote hai kyunki inme free electrons present hote hai jo metals meh easily move karte hai jis wajah se ye electricity conduct karte hai. Iske according hum yahan kah sakte hai ki electrical conductivity bhi metal ki characteristic property hoti hai.

5) Metals are Lustrous (or shiny) and can be Polished
Elements of metals lustrous hote hai matlab metals ka shining surface hota hai. For example gold, silver, copper ye shiny metals hote hai aur inhe polish bhi kiya ja sakta hai aur metal ki iss property ko hum metallic lustre (chamak) bolte hai. Metals ki iss shiny appearance ki wajah se inko hum jewellery aur decoration pieces ke liye use karte hai kyunki ye shiny aur bright hote hai.
ocr_image
Figure : Metals are lustrous (or shiny). These bangles are made of ‘gold’ metal because it is a highly lustrous (or shiny) metal.


Metal ke iss shiny appearance ki wajah se inko hum as reflector of light use karte hai jisme silver metal best reflector of light hota hai iss wajah se inko hum mirror making ke liye use karte hai. Ab metals ko agar hum open air meh kuch time ke liye rakh de tab ye apna shiny appearance kho kar dull appearance acquire karte hai kyunki tab ye apne surface par oxide, carbonate or sulphide ki thin layer form karte hai. As a result, tab metal surface corrode ho jata hai aur jab hum inke surface ko sand paper se rub karte hai tab inn metals ki corroded layer remove ho jati hai aur ye metals dubara se bright or shiny nature regain kar lete hai.

6) Metals are generally Hard (except sodium and potassium which are Soft metals)
Most of the metals hard hote hai lekin sabhi metals equally hard nahi hote inki hardness metal to metal differ karti hai. For example iron, copper, aluminium etc., ye hard metals hote hai. Inn metals ko hum knife se cut nahi kar sakte lekin sodium aur potassium soft metals hote hai jinko hum knife se easily cut kar sakte hai.
ocr_image
Figure : Sodium metal is so soft that it can be easily cut with a knife


7) Metals are Strong (except sodium and potassium which are not Strong)
Most of the metals strong hote hai matlab ye metals large weight ko easily hold kar sakte hai without breaking itself. For example iron metal strong hota hai jisko hum steel ki form meh use karte hai. Due to this, iron metal ko hum bridges, buildings, railway lines, vehicles making ke liye use karte hai. Lekin kuch metals jaise sodium aur potassium ye strong nahi hote.
ocr_image
Figure : Iron metal (as steel) is very strong. It is used to build bridges.


8) Metals are Solids at Room Temperature (except mercury which is a Liquid metal)
Most of the metals jaise iron, aluminium, silver, gold etc., room temperature par solids hote hai. Lekin metal mercury room temperature par solid na hokar liquid hota hai.

9) Metals have High Melting and Boiling Points (except sodium and potassium which have Low Melting and Boiling Points)
For example iron metal ka high melting point 1535C hota hai, iska matlab iss temperature par iron solid se liquid state meh convert hota hai. Similarly copper metal ka high melting point 1083C hota hai. Iske alawa metals meh kuch exceptions bhi hote hai jaise sodium aur potassium metals ka low melting point (98C aur 64C respectively) hota hai. Iske sath gallium aur caesium metals ka bhi low melting point (30C aur 28C respectively) hota hai aur ye dono metals toh body ki heat se hand par hi melt ho jate hai.

10) Metals are Sonorous, that is it makes Sound when Hit with an Object
Jab hum kisi metal ko kisi object ke sath hit karte hai tab ye ringing sound generate karta hai jiska matlab metal sonorous hote hai. Ab metal ki iss property ki wajah se inko hum bells, aur musical instruments jaise violin aur sitar ki wires making ke liye use karte hai.
ocr_image
Figure : Metals are sonorous. So they are used to make bells

Physical Properties of Metals

The important physical properties of metals are given below :

1) Metals are Malleable, that is, Metals can be beaten into Thin Sheets with a Hammer (without breaking)
If we take a piece of aluminium metal, and beat it with a hammer four or five times, we will find that the piece of aluminium metal turns into a thin aluminium sheet, without breaking. Then we can say that aluminium is a metal as it shows malleability. Malleability is an important characteristic property of metals that means most of the metals are malleable - Gold, Silver Aluminium and Copper metals are highly malleable metals. All these metals can be beaten with a hammer to form very thin sheets called foils. For example, silver metal foils are used for decorating sweets. Similarly, aluminium metal foils are used for packing food items like biscuits, chocolates, medicines, etc. Aluminium sheets are used for making cooking utensils also. Copper sheets are used to make utensils and other containers. Similarly, iron sheets are used to make boxes, buckets, drums and water tanks, etc.

ocr_image
Figure : Metals can be beaten into thin sheets with a hammer. They are malleable.


2) Metals are Ductile, that is, Metals can be drawn (or stretched) into Thin Wires
The metals such as copper, aluminium, magnesium and iron are available in the form of wires. This property of metals to be available in the form of thin wires by stretching is known as ductility. Ductility is another important characteristic property of metals that means most of the metals are ductile. But all the metals are not equally ductile. Gold is the most ductile metal. For example, 1 gram of gold can be drawn into a thin wire about 2 km long ! Silver is also among the best ductile metals. Copper and aluminium metals are also very ductile and can be drawn into thin copper wires and aluminium wires (which are used as electric wires). Iron, magnesium and tungsten metals are also quite ductile and can be drawn into thin wires. Iron wires are used for making wire gauzes and tungsten wires are used for making electric bulbs filaments. Magnesium wires are used in science experiments in the laboratory.
ocr_image
Figure : Metals can be drawn (or stretched) into thin wires. They are ductile.


3) Metals are Good Conductors of Heat
Metals are good conductors of heat which means that metals allow heat to pass through them easily. This can be demonstrated as follows :
(i) Take a flat aluminium rod and fix some small iron nails on it with the help of wax. This rod (alongwith its iron nails) is clamped to a stand.
(ii) Let us heat the free end (left end) of the aluminium rod by keeping a burner below it. We will see that the iron nails attached to aluminium rod with wax start falling one by one. The nail attached nearest to the heated end of the rod falls down first and then the next ones fall. But the nail attached to the clamped end of the rod drops last of all.
(iii) Since on heating the aluminium rod from the left side - the iron nails which are present close to it falls first, followed by the iron nails which are present away from it. This means heat travels from the hotter left end of the aluminium rod to its colder right end. Due to this the nails fall down one by one. From this experiment we conclude that an aluminium metal rod conducts heat.
ocr_image
Figure : Experiment to show that a metal (here aluminium) conducts heat


Metals are generally good conductors of heat (also called thermal conductivity). Silver metal is the best conductor of heat. It has the highest thermal conductivity. Copper and aluminium metals are also very good conductors of heat and they are used for making cooking utensils and water boilers, etc., because they are very good conductors of heat. The poorest conductor of heat among the metals are Lead & Mercury. Now we will discuss how a metal conducts heat. When a metal is heated, its atoms gain energy and vibrate more vigorously. This energy is transferred to the electrons present in the atoms, further these electrons move through the metal by which they transfer energy to other electrons and to other metal atoms as well. In this way, heat is conducted from one end of the metal to its other end. Thus, heat conductivity is a characteristics property of metal.
ocr_image
Figure : Metals conduct heat well. That is why this frying pan is made of a metal.


4) Metals are Good Conductors of Electricity
Metals are good conductors of electricity which means that metals allow electricity to pass through them easily. This can be demonstrated as follows :
(i) We take a dry cell, a torch bulb fitted in a holder and some connecting wires with crocodile clips, and connect them to make an electric circuit (Fig. a). There is a gap between the ends of the crocodile clips A and B so no current flows in the incomplete circuit (Fig. a) and hence the bulb does not light up.
(ii) Now when we insert a piece of aluminium foil between the ends of crocodile clips A and B (Fig. b). We will see that the bulb lights up at once. This means that the aluminium foil allows electric current to pass through it which means aluminium metal conducts electric current (or electricity). In other words, aluminium metal is a good conductor of electricity. Along with this the connecting wires that we are using are made up of copper and it is also a good conductor of electricity that's why these wires can conduct electricity.
ocr_image
Figure : Experiment to show that a metal (here aluminium) conducts electricity


Since metals are good conductors of electricity because they offer very little resistance to the flow of electric current and hence show high electrical conductivity. Among metals Silver metal is the best conductor of electricity. Copper metal is the next best conductor of electricity followed by gold, aluminium and tungsten. The electric wires are made of copper and aluminium metals because they are very good conductors of electricity. The metals like iron and mercury offer comparatively greater resistance to the flow of current, so they have lower electrical conductivity. We will now describe how a metal conducts electricity. Metals are good conductors of electricity because they contain free electrons. These free electrons can move easily through the metal and conduct electric current. Thus, electrical conductivity is another characteristic property of metals.

5) Metals are Lustrous (or shiny) and can be Polished
Metals are lustrous too because they have a shining surface. For example gold, silver, copper and they can be polished and this property of metal is known as metallic lustre. Due to the shiny appearance of metals they are useful for making jewellery and decoration pieces because they are bright and shiny.
ocr_image
Figure : Metals are lustrous (or shiny). These bangles are made of ‘gold’ metal because it is a highly lustrous (or shiny) metal.


The shiny appearance of metals make them good reflectors of light. Silver metal is an excellent reflector of light, that’s why it is used in making mirrors. When a metal has been kept exposed to air for a long time, then these metals lose their shine and get a dull appearance due to the formation of a thin layer of oxide, carbonate or sulphide on their surface. Then we can say the metal surface has corroded. On rubbing the metal surface with sand paper then the corroded layer is removed and the metal becomes shiny and bright again.

6) Metals are generally Hard (except sodium and potassium which are Soft metals)
Most metals are hard but all the metals are not equally hard, their hardness differs from metal to metal. For example iron, copper, aluminium etc., are hard metals. They cannot be cut with a knife. There are some exceptions - sodium aur potassium are soft metals which can be easily cut with a knife.
ocr_image
Figure : Sodium metal is so soft that it can be easily cut with a knife.


7) Metals are Strong (except sodium and potassium which are not Strong)
Most metals are strong which means these metals can hold large weights without breaking. For example iron is a strong metal which can be used in the form of steel. Due to this iron metal is used in the construction of bridges, buildings, railway lines, vehicles etc., But some metals like sodium and potassium are not strong enough.
ocr_image
Figure : Iron metal (as steel) is very strong. It is used to build bridges.


8) Metals are Solids at Room Temperature (except mercury which is a Liquid metal)
Most of the metals like iron, aluminium, silver, gold etc., are solids at room temperature. Only one metal, mercury, is in liquid state at the room temperature.

9) Metals have High Melting and Boiling Points (except sodium and potassium which have Low Melting and Boiling Points)
For example iron metal has a high melting point of 1535C, which means at this temperature iron melts and turns into liquid form. Similarly copper metal has a high melting point of 1083C. There are, however some exceptions also - sodium and potassium metals have low melting points of 98C and 64C respectively. Along with this gallium and caesium metals also have a low melting point of 30C and 28C respectively and these metals melting points are so low that they start melting in hand (by body heat).

10) Metals are Sonorous, that is it makes sound when Hit with an Object
When we suspend a big piece of metal and strike it with an object, we will find that it makes a ringing sound and then we can say metal is sonorous. Due to this property metals are used for making bells and strings of instruments like violin and sitar.
ocr_image
Figure : Metals are sonorous. So they are used to make bells.

Physical Properties of Non-Metals

Ab hum non-metals ki physical properties ko yahan discuss karenge jo metals ke just opposite hoti hai :

1) Non-metals are neither Malleable nor Ductile. Non-metals are Brittle (break easily)
Non-metals malleable nahi hote matlab hum inko hammer se beat kar thin sheets meh convert nahi kar sakte, iske sath ye ductile bhi nahi hote matlab inko stretch kar hum thin wires meh bhi convert nahi kar sakte. So as a result non-metals malleable aur ductile dono nahi hote hai, jiska matlab ye brittle hote hai matlab jab hum inko hammered ya fir stretched karte hai tab ye pieces meh break ho jate hai. For example sulphur aur phosphorus solid non-metals non-malleable, non-ductile ke sath brittle hote hai. Similarly carbon bhi ek solid non-metal hai aur ye bhi brittle hota hai. Accordingly brittleness non-metals ki characteristic property hoti hai.

ocr_image
Figure : Pencil lead is made of graphite (which is a form of carbon non-metal). Pencil lead breaks easily. It is brittle.


2) Non-metals do not Conduct Heat and Electricity
Generally non-metals heat aur electricity conduct nahi karte kyunki inke paas koi free electrons present nahi hote jo electricity aur heat conduction ke liye jaruri hote hai. For example sulphur and phosphorus non-metals hote hai aur ye heat aur electricity conduct nahi karte. Lekin inme exception bhi hota hai - Carbon ko jab hum graphite (allotrope) ki form meh use karte hai tab ye electricity conduct karta hai aur iss wajah se hum graphite ko electrodes making ke liye use karte hai. Ab non-metaIs electricity conduct nahi karte isko samjhne ke liye hum ek experiment consider karte hai.
(i) Sabse pehle hum electric circuit set up ke liye dry cell, torch bulb connected with holder aur crocodile clips consider karte hai aur inn sabko hum connecting wires se join karte hai as shown in (fig.a). Ab (fig.a) ko agar hum consider kare toh isme crocodile clips A aur B ke beech gap hai matlab ye circuit incomplete hai jis wajah se isme current flow nahi karega, accordingly we can say yahan bulb bhi glow nahi karega.
(ii) Ab agar hum crocodile clips A aur B ke gap ke beech sulphur piece ko insert kare, tab kyunki sulphur ek non-metal hai iss wajah se iss circuit ka bulb glow nahi karta (fig. b). Iska matlab yahan sulphur electric current passing ko allow nahi karta hai. Jiske according hum kah sakte hai ki sulphur (non-metal) yahan electricity conduct nahi karta.
ocr_image
Figure : Experiment to show that a non-metal (here sulphur) does not conduct electricity


3) Non-metals are not Lustrous (not shiny). They are Dull
Non-metals lustrous (chamak) nahi hote matlab inke paas shining surface nahi hota. Solid non-metals ka dull appearance hota hai. For example sulphur aur phosphorus non-metals hai aur ye lustrous nahi hote hai matlab inka shining surface na hokar dull appearance hota hai. Lekin yahan ek exception bhi hota hai - Iodine ek aisa non-metal hai jiska lustrous appearance hota hai jaise metals ka hota hai.

4) Non-metals are generally Soft (except diamond which is Hard)
Mostly non-metals soft hote hai. For example sulphur aur phosphorus, ye solid non-metals soft hote hai. Lekin yahan bhi ek exception hota hai - Carbon ki allotropic form diamond hard hoti hai, infact diamond hardest known natural substance hai.

5) Non-metals are not Strong. They are easily Broken
For example graphite non-metal strong nahi hota, iski strength low hoti hai. So jab hum large weight graphite sheet par rakhte hai tab ye break ho jati hai.

6) Non-metals may be Solid, Liquid or Gases at the Room Temperature
Non-metals 3 physical states meh exist karte hai - solid, liquid, gaseous. For example carbon, sulphur, phosphorus solid non-metals hai, bromine liquid non-metal hai, aur hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, chlorine gaseous non-metals hai.

7) Non-metals have comparatively Low Melting and Boiling Points (except diamond)
For example sulphur ka melting point 115C hota hai jo kafi low hai. Lekin non-metal carbon ki allotrope form diamond ka melting point kafi jyada hota hai 3500C.
ocr_image
Figure : The non-metal sulphur has a comparatively low melting point and can be easily melted on heating.


8) Non-metals are non-sonorous means they do not produce sound when hit with an Object

Physical Properties of Non-Metals

Now we are discussing physical properties of non-metals which are although opposite to that of metals. These are :

1) Non-metals are neither Malleable nor Ductile. Non-metals are Brittle (break easily)
Since non-metals are not malleable, they cannot be beaten with a hammer to form thin sheets. Also non-metals are not ductile, they cannot be stretched to form thin wires. Thus, solid non-metals can neither be hammered into thin sheets nor drawn into thin wires which means they are brittle according to that when they are hammered or stretched they break into pieces. For example, sulphur and phosphorus are solid non-metals which are non-malleable and non-ductile which means when they are beaten with a hammer or stretched, they break into pieces. Carbon is also a solid non-metal which is brittle. Thus, brittleness is a characteristic property of non-metals.

ocr_image
Figure : Pencil lead is made of graphite (which is a form of carbon non-metal). Pencil lead breaks easily. It is brittle.


2) Non-metals do not Conduct Heat and Electricity
Non-metals do not conduct heat and electricity because unlike metals, they have no free electrons (which are necessary to conduct heat and electricity). For example, sulphur and phosphorus are non-metals which do not conduct heat and electricity. There is, however, one exception. Carbon (in the form of graphite) is the only non-metal which is a good conductor of electricity that’s why they are used for making electrodes. We will now describe an experiment to demonstrate that non-metals do not conduct electricity.
(i) We take a dry cell, a torch bulb fitted in a holder and some connecting wires with crocodile clips, and connect them to make an electric circuit. There is a gap between the ends of the crocodile clips A and B so no current flows in the incomplete circuit (Fig. a) and hence the bulb does not light up.
(ii) Now when we insert a piece of sulphur between the ends of crocodile clips A and B (Fig b). We will see that the bulb still not lights up (Fig. b). This means that the sulphur does not allow electric current to pass through it which means sulphur non-metal does not conduct electric current (or electricity).
ocr_image
Figure : Experiment to show that a non-metal (here sulphur) does not conduct electricity


3) Non-metals are not Lustrous (not shiny). They are Dull.
Non-metals do not have lustre (chamak) which means that they do not have a shining surface. The solid non-metals have a dull appearance. For example, sulphur and phosphorus are non-metals which have no lustre, that is, they do not have a shining surface. They appear to be dull. There is, however, an exception. Iodine is a non-metal having lustrous appearance. It has a shining surface (like that of metals).

4) Non-metals are generally Soft (except diamond which is Hard)
Most of the solid non-metals are quite soft. For example, sulphur and phosphorus are solid non-metals which are quite soft. Only one non-metal carbon (in the form of diamond) is very hard. In fact, diamond (which is an allotropic form of carbon) is the hardest natural substance known.

5) Non-metals are not Strong. They are easily Broken
For example, graphite is a non-metal which is not strong which means it has low strength. So, when a large weight is placed on a graphite sheet, it gets breaks.

6) Non-metals may be Solid, Liquid or Gases at the Room Temperature
Non-metals can exist in all the three physical states : solid, liquid and gaseous. For example, carbon, sulphur and phosphorus are solid non-metals; bromine is a liquid non-metal; whereas hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen and chlorine are gaseous non-metals.

7) Non-metals have comparatively Low Melting and Boiling points (except diamond)
For example sulphur has a melting point of 115C which is quite low. But non-metal carbon allotrope form diamond has a melting point of 3500C which is very high.
ocr_image
Figure : The non-metal sulphur has a comparatively low melting point and can be easily melted on heating.


8) Non-metals are Non-Sonorous means they do not produce Sound when Hit with an Object

EXAMPLE 1

State the property utilized in the following :
(i) Graphite in making electrodes.
(ii) Electric wires are coated with polyvinyl chloride (PVC) or a rubber like material.
(iii) Metal alloys are used for making bells and strings of musical instruments.

(i) Graphite is a good conductor of electricity in spite of the reason that it is a non-metal. It is a crystalline allotropic form of carbon and its electrical conductivity is because of the presence of a free electron in each atom which is available to conduct electricity. (Carbon and its Compounds)
(ii) Electric wires are generally made of metals like copper and aluminium which are good conductors of electricity. In order to insulate, these are kept covered with PVC or any other rubber like material.
(iii) Gun metal (alloy of Cu = 90 & Sn = 10 parts) is used for making bells because it is very heavy. Similarly, stainless steel or any other variety of steel is used for the manufacture of strings of musical instruments since it is ductile in nature.

Chemical Properties of Metals

Ab hum metals ki chemical properties yahan discuss karenge :
1) Reaction of Metals with Oxygen (or Air)
Jab hum metals ko air ki oxygen ke sath burn karte hai tab ye metal oxides compound form karte hai :

ocr_image


Ab iss reaction se jo metal oxide milta hai wo basic nature ka hota hai matlab ye red litmus ko blue meh convert kar deta hai, aur kuch metal oxides jab water ke sath react karte hai tab ye alkalis generate karte hai. Ab metal ki oxygen ke sath reaction karne ki tendency metal ki chemical reactivity par depend karti hai. Jaise kuch metals sirf room temperature par react karte hai, kuch gentle heat aur kuch strong heating par oxygen ke sath react karte hai. For example

(i) Sodium metal air ki oxygen ke sath room temperature par react kar hume sodium oxide (basic oxide) compound deta hai.
ocr_image


Similarly potassium bhi air ki oxygen ke sath room temperature par react kar potassium oxide compound generate karta hai. Ab kyunki sodium aur potassium metals, oxygen ke sath room temperature par vigorously react karte hai iss wajah se jab hum inko open air meh rakhte hai tab ye fire catch kar sakte hai jiske according hum kah sakte hai ki ye dono metals kafi reactive hote hai. Isliye sodium aur potassium metal ko hum kerosene oil meh store karte hai, taki ye oxygen, moisture, aur carbon dioxide ke sath react na kare. Similarly lithium metal bhi highly reactive hota hai aur lithium metal ko bhi hum kerosene oil meh store karte hai.
Ab most of metal oxide water meh insoluble hote hai. Lekin kuch metal oxide water meh soluble hote hai aur wo water ke sath react kar alkalis form karte hai. For example sodium aur potassium oxide, water meh soluble hote hai.
ocr_image


Ab ye dono hydroxide basic nature ke hote hai matlab ye red litmus ko blue meh convert kar dete hai.
ocr_image
Figure : Sodium burns in the oxygen (of air) to form sodium oxide


(ii) Magnesium metal oxygen ke sath room temperature par react nahi karta. Lekin jab hum magnesium metal ko air meh heat ke sath burn karte hai tab ye magnesium oxide (basic oxide) compound generate karta hai.
ocr_image


Ab kyunki iss reaction ke liye hume heat provide karni pad rahi hai jiske according hum kah sakte hai ki magnesium metal as compared to sodium aur potassium metal less reactive hota hai. Now magnesium oxide water meh partially dissolves hota hai iss wajah se ye reaction ke baad magnesium hydroxide compound generate karta hai.
ocr_image


Ab kyunki magnesium hydroxide basic in nature hai iss wajah se ye bhi red litmus solution ko blue meh convert karta hai. Iske basic nature ko confirm karne ke liye hum ek experiment consider karte hai.
(a) Sabse pehle hum magnesium ribbon ko pair of tongs ki help se over the flame of burner heat karte hai. Ab jab magnesium ribbon air ki presence meh burn hota hai tab ye bright white light generate kar ash form karta hai jo magnesium oxide compound ki hoti hai.
(b) Iss ash ko ab hum test tube meh lete hai aur isme little water add kar isse shake karte hai, then we find that yahan magnesium oxide water meh partially dissolve hota hai.
(c) Ab iss solution ko hum 2 test tubes meh divide karte hai jisme hum red litmus aur blue litmus solution one by one add karte hai. So jis test tube meh hum blue litmus add karte hai uss solution ka koi colour change nahi hota aur jis test tube meh hum red litmus add karte hai uss solution ka colour blue meh change ho jata hai. Jiske according hum yahan confirm karte hai ki magnesium oxide compound basic in nature hota hai.
ocr_image
Figure : Burning of Magnesium ribbon


(iii) Now, aluminium metal ko jab hum air ki presence meh burn karte hai tab ye aluminium oxide compound form karta hai :
ocr_image


Ab yahan aluminium metal oxygen ke sath magnesium ki respect meh less readily react karta hai jiska matlab aluminium metal ki reactivity magnesium se kam hoti hai. Since most of metal oxides basic in nature hote hai, lekin kuch oxides acidic aur basic dono nature ke hote hai aur jo metal oxides acidic aur basic dono nature show karte ho unko hum amphoteric oxides bolte hai. Aluminium aur zinc metal amphoteric oxides form karte hai. Accordingly, amphoteric oxides acids aur base dono ke sath react kar salt aur water form karte hai. For example aluminium oxide amphoteric hai matlab ye acids aur bases dono ke sath react kar salt aur water form karta hai.
ocr_image


(iv) Lekin zinc metal only under strong heating conditions air meh burn hota hai, tabhi ye zinc oxide compound form karta hai :
ocr_image


Ab yahan zinc metal oxygen ke sath aluminium ki respect meh less readily react karta hai jiska matlab zinc metal ki reactivity aluminium se kam hoti hai. Moreover, aluminium oxide ki tarah zinc oxide bhi amphoteric nature show karta hai matlab ye bhi acids aur bases ke sath react kar salt aur water form karta hai.
ocr_image


(v) Iron metal strong heating condition meh bhi air ke sath burn nahi hota. Ab iron metal jab under heating air ki oxygen ke sath react karta hai tab ye iron (II, III) oxide form karta hai :
ocr_image


Since Fe3O4 meh 2Fe+3 aur 1Fe+2 present hote hai aur kyunki isme iron par +2, +3 charge present hai iss wajah se Fe3O4 ko hum iron (II, III) oxide bolte hai. Ab yahan iron metal oxygen ke sath zinc ki respect meh less readily react karta hai jiska matlab iron metal ki reactivity zinc se kam hoti hai. Similarly copper, gold, silver ki reactivity iron se bhi kam hoti hai.

2) Reaction of Metals with Water
Metals jab water ke sath react karte hai tab ye metal hydroxide (or metal oxide) aur hydrogen gas generate karte hai. Ab sabhi metals ki chemical reactivity different hoti hai, iss wajah se sabhi metals with different intensity water ke sath react karte hai. Kuch metals cold water ke sath, kuch hot water ke sath aur kuch sirf steam ke sath react karte hai aur kuch metals steam ke sath bhi react nahi karte.
(a) Jab metal cold or hot water ke sath react karta hai tab ye metal hydroxide aur hydrogen gas form karta hai :
ocr_image


(b) Similarly jab metal steam ke sath react karta hai tab ye metal oxide aur hydrogen gas form karta hai.
ocr_image


For example - (i) Potassium aur sodium metal cold water ke sath violently react kar potassium aur sodium hydroxide compounds respectively form karte hai aur sath meh hydrogen gas release karte hai.
ocr_image


Inn dono metals ki water ke sath exothermic reaction hoti hai matlab iss reaction meh heat release hoti hai, jis wajah se iss reaction meh jo hydrogen gas liberate hoti hai wo immediately fire catch kar sakti hai. Accordingly hum yahan ye kah sakte hai ki sodium aur potassium metals highly reactive hote hai.
(ii) Calcium metal jab cold water ke sath react karta hai tab ye calcium hydroxide aur hydrogen gas form karta hai.
ocr_image


Iss reaction meh jo heat release hoti hai wo itni sufficient nahi hoti ki released hydrogen gas ko burn kar sake. Calcium metal ki water ke sath reaction less violent hoti hai iss wajah se calcium metal as compared to sodium less reactive hota hai.
(iii) Magnesium metal cold water ke sath react nahi karta, par jab ye hot water ke sath react karta hai tab ye magnesium hydroxide aur hydrogen gas generate karta hai.
ocr_image


Ab kyunki magnesium metal hot water ke sath react karta hai iss wajah se magnesium metal as compared to calcium less reactive hota hai. Magnesium metal steam (at higher temperature) ke sath bhi reaction perform karta hai aur tab ye magnesium oxide aur hydrogen gas generate karta hai.
ocr_image


Inke alawa yahan kuch metals (like aluminium, iron, zinc) aise bhi hote hai jo hot aur cold dono water ke sath react nahi karte lekin ye steam ke sath react kar metal oxide aur hydrogen gas form karte hai. For example
(iv) Aluminium metal jab steam ke sath react karta hai tab ye aluminium oxide aur hydrogen gas form karta hai.
ocr_image


Aluminium metal water ke sath ordinary conditions par react nahi karta kyunki iske surface par aluminium oxide ki thin layer present hoti hai.
(v) Similarly zinc aur red hot iron bhi steam ke sath react kar zinc oxide aur iron (II, III) oxide compounds respectively form karte hai aur sath meh hydrogen gas release karte hai.
ocr_image


3) Reaction of Metals with Dilute acids
Metals jab dilute acids ke sath react karte hai tab ye acids ke hydrogen ko displace karte hai. Lekin metals jaise copper, silver, gold less reactive hone ki wajah se dilute acids ke hydrogen ko displace nahi kar sakte. Jab metals dilute acids ke sath react karte hai tab ye salt aur hydrogen gas form karte hai.
ocr_image


Ab kyunki different metals ki different chemical reactivity hoti hai iss wajah se kuch metal dilute acids ke sath explosively react karte hai, kuch metals fast, kuch sirf heating par react karte hai, lekin kuch metals react nahi bhi karte.
Now metals jab dilute hydrochloric acid ke sath react karte hai tab ye metal chloride aur hydrogen gas form karte hai. For example
(i) Sodium metal dilute hydrochloric acid ke sath violently reaction kar sodium chloride aur hydrogen gas form karta hai.
ocr_image


Iss reaction ke according hum kah sakte hai ki sodium very reactive metal hota hai.
(ii) Magnesium metal dilute hydrochloric acid ke sath quickly react kar magnesium chloride aur hydrogen gas form karta hai.
ocr_image


ocr_image
Figure : Magnesium metal reacts with dilute hydrochloric acid and giving off hydrogen gas


Lekin magnesium metal ki hydrochloric acid ke sath reaction sodium ki respect meh less vigorous hoti hai iss wajah se magnesium metal as compared to sodium less reactive hota hai.
(iii) Now aluminium metal dilute hydrochloric acid ke sath pehle slowly react karta hai kyunki iske surface par aluminium oxide ki protective layer present hoti hai. Lekin jab ye layer acid meh dissolve ho jati hai tab fresh aluminium metal, dilute hydrochloric acid ke sath rapidly reaction kar aluminium chloride aur hydrogen gas form karta hai.
ocr_image


ocr_image
Figure : Aluminium metal reacts with dilute hydrochloric acid and giving off hydrogen gas


Lekin aluminium ki hydrochloric acid ke sath reaction magnesium ki respect meh less rapid hoti hai iss wajah se aluminium metal as compared to magnesium less reactive hota hai.
(iv) Ab jab zinc metal dilute hydrochloric acid ke sath react karta hai tab ye zinc chloride aur hydrogen gas form karta hai aur iski dilute hydrochloric acid ke sath reaction aluminium se slow hoti hai iss wajah se zinc metal as compared to aluminium less reactive hota hai.
ocr_image


(v) Iron metal cold dilute hydrochloric acid ke sath slowly react kar iron (II) chloride aur hydrogen gas form karta hai, accordingly iron metal as compared to zinc less reactive hota hai.
ocr_image


(vi) Lekin yahan copper metal dilute hydrochloric acid or dilute sulphuric acid ke sath react nahi karta, jiske basis par hum kah sakte hai ki copper metal, iron se bhi less reactive hota hai.
ocr_image

ocr_image
Figure : Copper metal does not react with hydrochloric acid and does not give hydrogen gas.


Lekin agar hum metals ki dilute nitric acid ke sath reaction consider kare tab ye hydrogen gas formation nahi karte. Kyunki nitric acid ek strong oxidising agent hai jis wajah se iss chemical reaction meh jaise hi hydrogen gas ka formation hota hai waise hi hydrogen gas oxidise hokar water generate karti hai. So iss wajah se iss chemical reaction meh hydrogen gas ka formation nahi hota. Lekin jab metals jaise magnesium aur manganese very dilute nitric acid ke sath react karte hai tab ye corresponding metal nitrate aur hydrogen gas form karte hai, kyunki very dilute nitric acid weak oxidising agent hota hai jo hydrogen ko water meh oxidise nahi karta.
ocr_image


Aqua Regia
Aqua regia 1 part of concentrated nitric acid aur 3 parts of concentrated hydrochloric acid ka freshly prepared mixture hota hai, matlab isme conc. HNO3 aur conc. HCl ke beech ratio 1:3 hoti hai. Aqua regia highly corrosive, fuming liquid hota hai aur sabhi metals isme dissolved hote hai. For example aqua regia meh gold aur platinum metals bhi dissolve hote hai.
ocr_image
Figure : Aqua regia


The Reactivity Series of Metals
Kuch metals chemically very reactive hote hai aur kuch less reactive or unreactive hote hai. For example potassium aur sodium metal cold water ke sath rapidly react karte hai matlab ye dono metals highly reactive hote hai. Zinc aur iron metal sirf steam ke sath react karte hai, jiska matlab ye dono metals less reactive hote hai. Lekin copper aur silver metal steam ke sath bhi reaction nahi karte hai, so ye dono metals unreactive hote hai. Ab different metals oxygen, water aur dilute acids ke sath differently react karte hai, jiske basis par hum different metals ko vertical column meh decreasing order reactivities ke according arrange karte hai aur isko hum reactivity series of metals bolte hai. Iss reactivity series meh jo metal top par hai wo most reactive aur jo metal bottom par hai wo least reactive hota hai.
ocr_image


Iss reactivity series meh potassium most reactive metal hai so ye top par present hai aur jaise hum down the series move karte hai tab metal ki chemical reactivity decrease hoti hai. Gold metal iss series meh bottom par present hai iss wajah se ye least reactive metal hota hai. Moreover, silver aur gold metals down the series present hai iss wajah se ye nature meh free state (native state) meh milte hai. Iske alawa hydrogen non-metal hone ke baad bhi chemical reactivity of metal series meh present hai, kyunki ye metals ki tarah electrons lose kar H+ ion form kar sakta hai.
Iss reactivity series ko yaad rakhne ke liye hum ye line (bold letter) use kar sakte hai : Kashi Nath Ca Mama Aloo Zara Feke Pakata Hai

Why Some Metals are More Reactive and Others Less Reactive
Jaise ki hume pta hai ki kuch metals more reactive aur kuch metals less reactive hote hai. So, aisa kyun hota hai isko hum metals ki chemical reactivities ke basis par padhenge. Ab metals reaction meh electrons lose kar positive ions form karte hai, isme jo metals apne electrons easily lose kar positive ion form karte hai wo other substances ke sath easily chemical reaction perform karte hai matlab ye metals more reactive hote hai. Similarly, kuch metals apne electrons easily lose nahi karte matlab ye metals positive ions easily form nahi karte accordingly ye metals dusre substances ke sath slowly react karte hai. Thus, ye metals less reactive hote hai. For example sodium atoms electrons ko easily lose kar sodium ions form kar sakte hai, iss wajah se sodium very reactive metal hota hai, lekin iron atoms electrons ko less readily lose kar positive ions form karte hai, iss wajah se iron less reactive metal hota hai.

Metals Which are More Reactive than Hydrogen
Ab jo metals hydrogen ki respect meh more easily electrons lose karte hai, wo metals hydrogen se jyada reactive hote hai. Moreover, jo metals reactivity series meh hydrogen ke oopar present hote hai wo hydrogen se jyada reactive hote hai, kyunki ye metals hydrogen ki respect meh more easily electrons lose kar sakte hai. Thus, jo metals hydrogen se jyada reactive hote hai wo hai - Potassium, Sodium, Calcium, Magnesium, Aluminium, Zinc, Iron, Tin aur Lead. Ye metals acids aur water se hydrogen ko displace kar hydrogen gas form kar sakte hai.

Metals Which are Less Reactive than Hydrogen
Similarly, jo metals hydrogen ki respect meh less readily electrons lose karte hai, wo metals hydrogen se less reactive hote hai. Moreover, jo metals reactivity series meh hydrogen ke niche present hote hai wo hydrogen se less reactive hote hai, kyunki ye metals hydrogen ki respect meh less readily electrons lose karte hai. Thus, jo metals hydrogen se less reactive hote hai wo hai - Copper, Mercury, Silver, aur Gold. Ye metals acids aur water ke sath reaction par hydrogen gas formation nahi karte hai.

4) Reaction of Metals with Salt Solutions
Jab ek more reactive metal, salt solution of less reactive metal ke sath react karta hai tab more reactive metal salt solution se less reactive metal ko displace kar apna salt solution form karta hai. In other words, a more reactive metal displaces a less reactive metal from its salt solution. For example metal A as compared to metal B more reactive hai, so metal A salt solution of metal B se metal B ko displace kar apna salt solution form karta hai.
ocr_image


For example (i) The reaction of Zinc with Copper Sulphate solution - Jab hum zinc metal ki strip ko copper sulphate solution ke sath react karte hai, tab copper sulphate ka blue colour solution, zinc sulphate colourless solution meh change ho jata hai aur red brown copper metal zinc strip par deposit ho jata hai.
ocr_image


Iss reaction meh zinc metal, copper sulphate solution se copper metal ko displace karta hai, kyunki iss displacement reaction meh zinc metal as compared to copper jyada reactive hota hai. Lekin jab hum copper metal ko zinc sulphate solution ke sath react karte hai tab yahan koi product formation nahi hota kyunki copper metal as compared to zinc less reactive hota hai iss wajah se ye zinc sulphate meh zinc ko replace nahi karta. Similarly, jab hum silver metal ko copper sulphate solution ke sath react karte hai tab yahan bhi koi product formation nahi hota kyunki silver metal as compared to copper less reactive hota hai iss wajah se ye copper sulphate meh copper ko replace nahi karta.
(ii) The reaction of Iron with Copper Sulphate solution - Jab hum iron metal strip (or iron nail) ko copper sulphate solution ke sath react karte hai tab copper sulphate ka blue colour solution, green colour iron sulphate solution meh change ho jata hai aur sath meh red-brown copper metal iron nail or strip par deposit ho jata hai.
ocr_image


Iss reaction meh iron metal, copper sulphate solution se copper metal ko displace karta hai, kyunki iss displacement reaction meh iron metal as compared to copper jyada reactive hota hai. Lekin jab hum copper metal ko iron sulphate solution ke sath react karte hai tab yahan koi product formation nahi hota kyunki copper metal as compared to iron less reactive hota hai iss wajah se ye iron sulphate meh iron ko replace nahi karta.
ocr_image
Figure : Iron nail was left in copper sulphate solution. It displaces copper from copper sulphate solution. The displaced copper forms a red-brown coating on the surface of the iron nail.


(iii) The reaction of Copper with Silver Nitrate solution - Jab hum copper metal strip ko silver nitrate solution meh dipped karte hai tab solution gradually blue hota hai aur shining greyish-white silver metal copper strip par deposit hota hai.
ocr_image


Iss reaction meh copper metal as compared to silver jyada reactive hai iss wajah se copper metal silver ko silver nitrate solution se displace kar copper nitrate aur silver metal form karta hai. Lekin jab hum strip of silver metal ko copper nitrate solution se react karte hai tab yahan koi product formation nahi hota kyunki silver metal as compare to copper less reactive hota hai iss wajah se ye copper metal ko copper nitrate se displace nahi karta.
ocr_image
Figure : A copper wire has been placed in silver nitrate solution (left). Copper displaces silver from silver nitrate solution. This silver is deposited on the copper wire coil (right).


5) Reaction of Metals with Chlorine
Metals jab chlorine ke sath react karte hai tab ye ionic chlorides form karte hai. Ab metal chloride formation meh metal atoms apne electrons lose kar positively charged ions aur chlorine atoms electrons (metal se) gain kar negatively charged chloride ions form karte hai. Metal chlorides generally solids hote hai aur ye solution or molten state meh electricity conduct karte hai. Iska matlab metal chlorides electrolytes hote hai aur metal chlorides ka melting aur boiling point high hota hai aur ye commonly non-volatile hote hai. For example jab hum Sodium, Calcium, Magnesium, Aluminium, Zinc, Iron, Copper etc., metals ke sath chlorine ki reaction perform karte hai tab ye hume corresponding ionic metal chlorides compounds as product dete hai.
ocr_image


Ab hum inki corresponding chemical reactions consider karte hai.
ocr_image


6) Reaction of Metals with Hydrogen
Metals generally hydrogen ke sath reaction nahi karte kyunki metals, compound formation ke liye electrons lose karte hai aur hydrogen bhi compound formation ke liye electrons lose karta hai. So normally hydrogen atom compound formation ke liye metal atom se electron accept nahi karta. Lekin kuch reactive metals (jaise sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium) hydrogen atoms ko force karte hai to accept electrons given by them, taki ye salt like metal hydrides compounds form kar sake. Metal hydrides bhi ionic compounds hote hai jahan transfer of electrons from metal atoms to hydrogen atoms hota hai. Metal hydride meh hydrogen, negative hydride H ion ki form meh present hota hai. For example
(i) Jab hum hydrogen gas ko sodium metal ke sath heat karte hai tab ye sodium hydride (NaH) compound form karta hai.
ocr_image


Sodium hydride yahan ionic compound hai jisme sodium ions Na+ aur hydride ions H present hai. Similarly, jab hum potassium metal ko hydrogen gas ke sath react karte hai tab ye potassium hydride (KH) ionic compound form karta hai.
(ii) Also, jab hum calcium metal ko hydrogen gas ke sath react karte hai tab ye calcium hydride (CaH2) compound generate karta hai.
ocr_image


Calcium hydride yahan ionic compound hai jisme calcium ions Ca2+ aur hydride ions 2H present hai. Similarly jab hum magnesium metal ko hydrogen gas ke sath react karte hai tab ye magnesium hydride (MgH2) ionic compound form karta hai. Since metals jaise zinc, copper, iron jyada reactive nahi hote iss wajah se ye hydrogen ke sath react nahi karte.

Chemical Properties of Metals

The important chemical properties of metals are given below :
1) Reaction of Metals with Oxygen (or Air)
When metals are burnt in air, they react with the oxygen of air to form metal oxides :

ocr_image


The metal oxide obtained in this reaction is basic in nature which converts red litmus to blue and when this metal oxide reacts with water it forms alkalis. The tendency of metal to react with oxygen depends on its chemical reactivity, some metals react with oxygen even at room temperature, some react on heating, whereas others react only on strong heating. For example
(i) Sodium metal reacts with the oxygen of air at room temperature to form sodium oxide (basic oxide).
ocr_image


Similarly potassium also reacts with oxygen of air at room temperature to form basic oxide which is potassium oxide. Since potassium and sodium react with oxygen vigorously even at room temperature which means they are very reactive and that’s why when we kept them in open air then they catch fire and burn. Due to this, sodium and potassium metal are stored under kerosene oil to prevent their reaction with the oxygen, moisture and carbon dioxide of air. Similarly lithium metal is also very reactive and it is also stored under kerosene oil to prevent its reaction with oxygen, moisture and carbon dioxide.
Most of the metal oxides are insoluble in water. But some of the metal oxides dissolve in water to form alkalis. For example sodium and potassium oxides are water soluble.
ocr_image


These hydroxides are basic in nature that’s why these can convert red litmus to blue.
ocr_image
Figure : Sodium burns in the oxygen (of air) to form sodium oxide


(ii) Magnesium metal does not react with oxygen at room temperature. But on heating magnesium metal burns in air and give basic oxide called magnesium oxide.
ocr_image


Since heat is required for the reaction of magnesium with oxygen, it means magnesium is less reactive than sodium and potassium. Also magnesium oxide is partially dissolves in water to form magnesium hydroxide solution.
ocr_image


Now magnesium hydroxide obtained is basic in nature and basic solution can convert red litmus solution to blue. We can confirm this by performing an experiment :
(a) We take a magnesium ribbon, hold it with a pair of tongs and heat it over the flame of a burner. Magnesium ribbon burns vigorously in air producing a bright white light to form an ash (which is magnesium oxide).
(b) We put this magnesium oxide in a test-tube, add a little water and shake it. We will find that magnesium oxide dissolves in water partially.
(c) Let us divide this solution in two parts and test with blue litmus solution and red litmus solution, one by one. When blue litmus solution is added to magnesium oxide solution, there is no change in colour ; On adding red litmus solution to magnesium oxide solution, the colour changes to blue. According to this, we can conclude that magnesium oxide is basic in nature.
ocr_image
Figure : Burning of Magnesium ribbon


(iii) Aluminium metal burns in air, on heating, to form aluminium oxide :
ocr_image


Since the reaction of aluminium with oxygen takes place less readily than magnesium, so aluminium is less reactive than magnesium. Though most of the metal oxides are basic in nature but some of the metal oxides show basic as well as acidic nature. Those metal oxides which show basic as well as acidic behaviour are known as amphoteric oxides. Aluminium metal and zinc metal form amphoteric oxides. Amphoteric oxides react with both acids as well as bases to form salts and water. For example, aluminium oxide is an amphoteric oxide which reacts with acids as well as bases to form salt and water.
ocr_image


(iv) Zinc metal burns in air only on strong heating to form zinc oxide :
ocr_image


Since the reaction of zinc with oxygen takes place less readily than aluminium, so zinc is less reactive than aluminium. Also, zinc oxide is an amphoteric oxide which reacts with acids as well as bases to form salts and water.
ocr_image


(v) Iron metal does not burn in air even on strong heating. Iron reacts with the oxygen of air on heating to form iron (II, III) oxide :
ocr_image


In Fe3O4 there are 2Fe+3 and 1Fe+2 is present and because of the presence of +2, +3 charge on iron Fe3O4 is known as iron (II, III) oxide. Since the reaction of iron with oxygen takes place less readily than zinc, so iron is less reactive than zinc. Similarly copper, gold, silver are also less reactive than iron metal.

2) Reaction of Metals with Water
Metals react with water to form a metal hydroxide (or metal oxide) and hydrogen gas. All the metals, however, do not react with water. The intensity of reaction of a metal with water depends on its chemical reactivity. Some metals react even with cold water, some react with hot water, some react only with steam whereas others do not react even with steam.
(a) When a metal reacts with water (cold water or hot water), then the products formed are metal hydroxide and hydrogen gas :
ocr_image


(b) When a metal reacts with steam, then the products formed are metal oxide and hydrogen gas :
ocr_image


For example - (i) Potassium and sodium metals react violently even with cold water to form potassium and sodium hydroxide respectively along with that they form hydrogen gas.
ocr_image


The reaction of these 2 metals with water is exothermic means heat is released during the reaction, due to which the hydrogen gas formed during the reaction catches fire and burns. Thus sodium and potassium are very reactive metals.
(ii) Calcium metal reacts with cold water to form calcium hydroxide and hydrogen gas :
ocr_image


The heat produced in this reaction is less which is not sufficient to burn the hydrogen gas which is formed. The reaction of calcium metal with water is less violent. So, calcium is less reactive than sodium.
(iii) But magnesium metal does not react with cold water. Magnesium reacts with hot water to form magnesium hydroxide and hydrogen :
ocr_image


Calcium reacts with cold water but magnesium reacts only with hot water. This shows that magnesium is less reactive than calcium. Also, magnesium reacts very rapidly with steam (at higher temperature) to form magnesium oxide and hydrogen :
ocr_image


Metals like aluminium, zinc and iron do not react with either cold water or hot water. They react with steam to form a metal oxide and hydrogen. For example
(iv) Aluminium metal reacts with steam to form aluminium oxide and hydrogen gas :
ocr_image


Aluminium metal does not react with water under ordinary conditions because of the presence of a thin layer of aluminium oxide on its surface.
(v) Similarly zinc and red hot iron metals react with steam to form zinc oxide and iron (II, III) oxide along with that they release hydrogen gas.
ocr_image


3) Reaction of Metals with Dilute acids
Metals usually displace hydrogen from dilute acids. Only the less reactive metals like copper, silver and gold do not displace hydrogen from dilute acids. When a metal reacts with a dilute acid, then a metal salt and hydrogen gas are formed :
ocr_image


The vigour of reaction of a metal with dilute acid depends on its chemical reactivity. Some metals react explosively (extremely rapidly) with dilute acids, some metals react rapidly, some metals react only on heating whereas others do not react at all.
Metals react with dilute hydrochloric acid to give metal chlorides and hydrogen gas. For example
(i) Sodium metal reacts violently with dilute hydrochloric acid to form sodium chloride and hydrogen :
ocr_image


This reaction shows that sodium metal is very reactive.
(ii) Magnesium metal reacts quite rapidly with dilute hydrochloric acid forming magnesium chloride and hydrogen gas :
ocr_image

ocr_image
Figure : Magnesium metal reacts with dilute hydrochloric acid and giving off hydrogen gas.


The reaction of magnesium with dilute hydrochloric acid is less vigorous than that of sodium, so magnesium is less reactive than sodium.
(iii) Now aluminium metal at first reacts slowly with dilute hydrochloric acid due to the presence of a thin protective layer of aluminium oxide on its surface. But when the thin outer oxide layer gets dissolved in acid, then fresh aluminium metal is exposed which reacts rapidly with dilute hydrochloric acid and forms aluminium chloride and hydrogen gas.
ocr_image

ocr_image
Figure : Aluminium metal reacts with dilute hydrochloric acid and giving off hydrogen gas.


The reaction of aluminium with dilute hydrochloric acid is less rapid than that of magnesium, so aluminium is less reactive than magnesium.
(iv) Zinc metal reacts with dilute hydrochloric acid to give zinc chloride and hydrogen gas, but the reaction is less rapid than that of aluminium which confirmed that zinc is less reactive than aluminium.
ocr_image


(v) Iron metal reacts slowly with cold dilute hydrochloric acid to give iron (II) chloride and hydrogen gas, accordingly we can say that iron metal is less reactive than zinc.
ocr_image


(vi) Similarly, copper metal does not react with dilute hydrochloric acid or dilute sulphuric acid. This shows that copper is even less reactive than iron.
ocr_image

ocr_image
Figure : Copper metal does not react with hydrochloric acid and does not give hydrogen gas.


Now consider the reactions of metals with dilute nitric acid. When a metal reacts with dilute nitric acid, then hydrogen gas is not evolved. It is because nitric acid is a strong oxidising agent. So, as soon as hydrogen gas is formed in the reaction between a metal and dilute nitric acid, the nitric acid oxidises this hydrogen to water. So, in the reactions of metals with dilute nitric acid, no hydrogen gas is evolved. However some metals like magnesium and manganese when reacts with very dilute nitric acid they form corresponding metal nitrate and hydrogen gas, because very dilute nitric acid is a weak oxidising agent which does not oxidise hydrogen to water.
ocr_image


Aqua Regia
Aqua regia is a freshly prepared mixture of 1 part of concentrated nitric acid and 3 parts of concentrated hydrochloric acid. Thus, the ratio of conc. HNO3 and conc. HCl in aqua regia is 1:3. Aqua regia is highly corrosive, fuming and it can dissolve all metals. For example aqua regia can dissolve even gold and platinum metals.
ocr_image
Figure : Aqua regia


The Reactivity Series of Metals
Some metals are chemically very reactive whereas others are less reactive or unreactive. For example, potassium and sodium react very rapidly with cold water, so they are very reactive metals. Zinc and iron react only with steam, so they are less reactive metals. On the other hand, copper and silver do not react even with steam, so they are quite unreactive metals. On the basis of vigour of reactions of various metals with oxygen, water and acids the metals have been arranged in a group or series according to their chemical reactivity.
The arrangement of metals in a vertical column in the order of decreasing reactivities is called the reactivity series of metals.
In reactivity series, the most reactive metal is placed at the top whereas the least reactive metal is placed at the bottom.
ocr_image


Since potassium is the most reactive metal here, so it has been placed at the top in the reactivity series. As we come down in the series the chemical reactivity of metals decreases. Gold being least reactive metal has been placed at the bottom in the series. Since the metals placed at the bottom of the reactivity series (like silver and gold) are less reactive, so they are usually found in free state (native state) in nature. Though hydrogen is not a metal but even then it has been placed in the reactivity series of metals. This is due to the fact that like metals, hydrogen also loses electrons and forms positive ions H+. It can be learned with the help of a mnemonic (bold letter) : Kashi Nath Ca Mama Aloo Zara Feke Pakata Hai

Why Some Metals are More Reactive and Others Less Reactive
As we know some metals are more reactive and others are less reactive, the reason for this difference in the chemical reactivities of metals. When metals react, they lose electrons to form positive ions. Now, if a metal atom can lose electrons easily to form positive ions, it will react rapidly with other substances and hence it will be a reactive metal. On the other hand, if a metal atom loses electrons less readily to form positive ions, it will react slowly with other substances. Such a metal will be less reactive. For example, sodium atoms lose electrons readily to form sodium ions, due to which sodium metal is very reactive. On the other hand, iron atoms lose electrons less readily to form positive ions, so iron metal is less reactive.

Metals Which are More Reactive than Hydrogen
Those metals which lose electrons more readily than hydrogen are said to be more reactive than hydrogen. All the metals which have been placed above hydrogen in the reactivity series, lose electrons more readily than hydrogen, and hence they are more reactive than hydrogen. Thus, the metals which are more reactive than hydrogen are - Potassium, Sodium, Calcium, Magnesium, Aluminium, Zinc, Iron, Tin and Lead. These more reactive metals can displace hydrogen from its compounds like water and acids to form hydrogen gas.

Metals Which are Less Reactive than Hydrogen
Those metals which lose electrons less readily than hydrogen are said to be less reactive than hydrogen. All the metals placed below hydrogen in the reactivity series lose electrons less readily than hydrogen, and hence they are less reactive than hydrogen. Thus, the metals which are less reactive than hydrogen are - Copper, Mercury, Silver, and Gold. These less reactive metals cannot displace hydrogen from its compounds like water and acids to form hydrogen gas.

4) Reaction of Metals with Salt Solutions
When a more reactive metal reacts with a salt solution of a less reactive metal, then the more reactive metal displaces the less reactive metal from its salt solution and forms its own salt solution. In other words, a more reactive metal displaces a less reactive metal from its salt solution. For example, if metal A is more reactive than metal B, then metal A will displace metal B from its salt solution to form salt solution of metal A, and metal B will be set free.
ocr_image


For example (i) The reaction of Zinc with Copper Sulphate solution - When a strip of zinc metal is put in copper sulphate solution, then the blue colour of copper sulphate solution fades gradually due to the formation of colourless zinc sulphate solution, and red-brown copper metal is deposited on the zinc strip :
ocr_image


In this reaction zinc metal is displacing copper metal from its salt solution, copper sulphate solution because zinc is more reactive than copper. However, if a strip of copper metal is placed in zinc sulphate solution, then no reaction occurs. This is because copper metal is less reactive than zinc metal and hence cannot displace zinc from zinc sulphate solution. If we put silver metal in copper sulphate solution, even then no reaction takes place. This is because silver metal is less reactive than copper metal and hence cannot displace copper from copper sulphate solution.
(ii) The reaction of Iron with Copper Sulphate solution - When a strip of iron metal (or iron nail) is placed in copper sulphate solution, then the blue colour of copper sulphate solution fades gradually and forms green colour iron sulphate solution with red-brown copper metal deposited on iron nail or strip :
ocr_image


In this reaction, iron is displacing copper from copper sulphate solution. This displacement occurs because iron is more reactive than copper. However, if a strip of copper metal is placed in iron (II) sulphate solution, then no reaction occurs. This is because copper is less reactive than iron and hence cannot displace iron from iron (II) sulphate solution.
ocr_image
Figure : Iron nail was left in copper sulphate solution. It displaces copper from copper sulphate solution. The displaced copper forms a red-brown coating on the surface of iron nail.


(iii) The reaction of Copper with Silver Nitrate solution - When a strip of copper metal is kept immersed in silver nitrate solution for some time, the solution gradually becomes blue and a shining greyish-white deposit of silver metal is formed on copper strip :
ocr_image


In this reaction, copper is displacing silver from silver nitrate solution. This displacement occurs because copper is more reactive than silver. However, if a strip of silver metal is placed in copper nitrate solution, then no reaction occurs. This is because silver metal is less reactive than copper and hence cannot displace copper from copper nitrate solution.
ocr_image
Figure : A copper wire has been placed in silver nitrate solution (left). Copper displaces silver from silver nitrate solution. This silver is deposited on the copper wire coil (right).


5) Reaction of Metals with Chlorine
Metals react with chlorine to form ionic chlorides. During the formation of metal chlorides, the metal atoms lose electrons and become positively charged ions, whereas chlorine atoms gain electrons and become negatively charged chloride ions. Metal chlorides are usually solid and conduct electricity in solution or in molten state. Thus, metals chlorides are electrolytes. Metal chlorides have high melting and boiling points due to which most of them are non-volatile. For example when we react metals like Sodium, Calcium, Magnesium, Aluminium, Zinc, Iron, Copper etc., with chlorine they form corresponding ionic metal chlorides compounds as a product.
ocr_image


Now consider their corresponding chemical reactions
ocr_image


6) Reaction of Metals with Hydrogen
Metals generally do not react with hydrogen because metals form compounds by losing electrons and hydrogen also forms compounds by losing electrons (or by sharing of electrons). So, normally a hydrogen atom does not accept the electrons given by a metal atom to form a compound. But a few very reactive metals like sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium can force the hydrogen atoms to accept electrons given by them and form salt-like solid compounds called metal hydrides. Metal hydrides are ionic compounds formed by the transfer of electrons from metal atoms to hydrogen atoms. In a metal hydride, the hydrogen is present in the form of a negative ion (anion) called hydride ion, H. For example
(i) When hydrogen gas is passed over heated sodium, then sodium hydride (NaH) is formed.
ocr_image


Sodium hydride here is an ionic compound in which sodium ions Na+ and hydride ions H are present. Similarly, when we consider reaction of potassium metal with hydrogen gas then it forms potassium hydride (KH) which is also an ionic compound.
(ii) Also when calcium metal reacts with hydrogen gas then calcium hydride (CaH2) is formed.
ocr_image


Calcium hydride here is an ionic compound in which calcium ions Ca2+ and hydride ions 2H are present. Similarly, when we consider the reaction of magnesium metal with hydrogen gas then it forms magnesium hydride (MgH2) which is also an ionic compound. Since metals like zinc, copper, iron are less reactive that’s why they do not react with hydrogen to form hydride ions H.

Hello Points!

Now we study the reaction of metals (like magnesium, aluminium, zinc and iron) with steam by using the apparatus.
(a) A lump of glass wool soaked in water is placed at the bottom of a boiling tube. The water present in glass wool will form steam on heating. The metal sample is placed in the middle of the boiling tube as shown in figure.
(b) Now the metal sample is heated by using a burner. When the metal gets hot, then the glass wool is heated by using another burner. The water present in glass wool forms steam on heating. This steam then passes over the hot metal. The hot metal reacts with steam to form the corresponding metal oxide and hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas comes out of the boiling tube and it is collected over water as shown in figure.
(c) When a lighted match stick is applied to the gas collected in the gas jar, the gas burns with a pop sound, indicating that it is hydrogen. The metal oxide formed remains behind in the boiling tube.
This experiment is performed by taking magnesium, aluminium, zinc, and iron as metal samples, one by one. It is found that the reaction of steam with magnesium is the most vigorous followed by the reactions with aluminium and zinc; but the reaction with iron is very slow. This shows that out of magnesium, aluminium, zinc and iron : magnesium is the most reactive whereas iron is the least reactive. On the basis of the vigour of their reaction with steam, we can arrange magnesium, aluminium, zinc and iron metals in the decreasing order of their reactivity as :

Mg>Al>Zn>Fe

Metals like lead, copper, silver and gold do not react with water (or even steam).
ocr_image
Figure : Experimental set up to study the reaction of metals with steam.


We will now describe an experiment to show the relative reactivities of some metals with a dilute acid.
For this we take small pieces of magnesium, aluminium, zinc, iron and copper metals.
(a) Place these metal pieces in separate test-tubes and add equal volume of 10 mL of dilute hydrochloric acid to each test-tube.
(b) Observe the rate of formation of hydrogen gas bubbles carefully.
(c) We will find that the formation of bubbles of hydrogen is fastest in the case of magnesium showing that magnesium is the most reactive metal here.
The rate of formation of hydrogen gas bubbles decreases in the order - Mg>Al>Zn>Fe. But no hydrogen gas bubbles are formed in the test-tube containing copper metal and dilute hydrochloric add. This shows that copper does not react with dilute hydrochloric add and hence it is the least reactive out of these metals. Silver and gold metals also do not react with dilute acids.

Similarly, metals like sodium, potassium, aluminium, zinc, and iron react with dilute sulphuric acid to give metal sulfates and hydrogen gas as product. Now copper is less reactive among them so it does not react with dilute sulphuric acid also.
ocr_image

Chemical Properties of Non-Metals

Ab hum non-metals ki chemical properties ko study karte hai :

1) Reaction of Non-Metals with Oxygen
Jab hum non-metals ko oxygen ke sath react karte hai tab ye acidic or neutral oxides compound form karte hai. Jisme carbon aur sulphur acidic oxides CO2,SO2 aur hydrogen neutral oxide H2O form karte hai. Iske sath non-metal oxides covalent nature ke hote hai matlab ye sharing of electrons se form hote hai. Moreover, non-metals ke acidic oxides jab water ke sath react karte hai tab ye acids form karte hai aur acidic solution blue litmus ko red meh convert karte hai. For example
(i) Carbon non-metal jab oxygen ke sath react karta hai tab ye acidic oxide called carbon dioxide form karta hai. Ab jab ye acidic oxide matlab carbon dioxide, water ke sath react karta hai tab ye carbonic acid form karta hai.

ocr_image


So, carbon dioxide gas jab water meh present hoti hai tab ye acidic nature show karti hai iss wajah se tab ye blue litmus ko red meh change kar sakti hai.
(ii) Similarly, jab sulphur non-metal oxygen ke sath react karta hai tab ye acidic oxide called sulphur dioxide form karta hai. Ab jab ye acidic oxide matlab sulphur dioxide, water ke sath react karta hai tab ye sulphurous acid form karta hai.
ocr_image


So, sulphur dioxide gas jab water meh present hoti hai tab ye acidic nature show karti hai iss wajah se tab ye blue litmus ko red meh change kar sakti hai.

Isko Confirm karne ke liye hum Ek Experiment Consider karte hai.
(a) So sabse pehle hum sulphur powder ko combustion spoon par burner ki help se heat karte hai. After some time yahan sulphur blue flame ke sath burn hone lagta hai. Tab hum iss combustion spoon ko gas jar meh introduce karte hai aur sulphur ko gas jar meh burn hone dete hai. Ab jab sulphur, gas jar ki air meh burn hota hai tab ye pungent smelling gas, sulphur dioxide form karta hai aur jab yahan complete sulphur burn ho jata hai tab hum combustion spoon ko gas jar se remove kar, iss gas jar ko lid se cover karte hai.
(b) Next, hum iss gas jar meh water add kar isse lid se cover karte hai aur fir hum iss jar ko shake kar sulphur dioxide gas dissolve karte hai. Later on, iss solution ko hum 2 test tubes meh divide karte hai.
(c) Ab hum inn test tube solutions ko blue/red litmus solution or moist blue/red litmus paper se test karte hai. So jab hum blue litmus solution or moist blue litmus paper ko sulphur dioxide solution meh add karte hai tab ye red meh change hota hai aur kyunki acidic substances blue litmus ko red meh convert karte hai accordingly we can say sulphur dioxide acidic in nature hota hai.
Lekin jab hum red litmus solution or moist red litmus paper ko sulphur dioxide solution meh add karte hai tab yahan koi colour change nahi hota.
ocr_image


Similarly CO2 solution bhi litmus solution or moist litmus paper ke sath similar results deta hai.

Ab kuch non-metal oxides neutral bhi hote hai matlab wo na toh acidic aur na hi basic hote hai jaise carbon monoxide (CO), water (H2O), nitrogen monoxide (NO), aur dinitrogen monoxide (N2O). Ye oxides red or blue litmus solution ke sath koi colour change show nahi karte. Inn oxides ka agar hum formation consider kare :
(i) Carbon non-metal ko jab hum insufficient oxygen ke sath react karte hai tab ye neutral oxide called carbon monoxide form karta hai aur jab hum isko further water ke sath react karte hai tab ye acid formation nahi karta.
ocr_image


(ii) Hydrogen non-metal ko jab hum oxygen ke sath react karte hai tab ye neutral oxide called water form karta hai. Water ko hum hydrogen oxide bolte hai aur non-metals ke oxide sharing of electrons se form hote hai matlab ye covalent compounds hote hai.
ocr_image


2) Reaction of Non-Metals with Water
Non-metals water (or steam) ke sath react nahi karte to evolve hydrogen gas. Kyunki non-metals electrons lose nahi karte to reduce hydrogen ions of water into hydrogen gas.

3) Reaction of Non-Metals with Dilute Acids
Non-metals jaise carbon, sulphur, phosphorus etc., dilute acids jaise hydrochloric acid or sulphuric acid ke sath react nahi karte, matlab ye acids ke hydrogen ko displace nahi karte. Jiski wajah se ye hydrogen gas form nahi karte. Ab aisa kyun hota hai ? So acids ke hydrogen H+ ions ko hydrogen gas meh convert karne ke liye hume inn ions ko electrons supply karne hote hai. Lekin non-metal electron acceptors hote hai iss wajah se ye apne electrons hydrogen H+ ions of acid ko nahi dete to reduce them to hydrogen gas. Therefore, non-metals jaise carbon, sulphur, phosphorus ko jab hum dil HClorH2SO4 se react karte hai tab ye hydrogen gas ka formation nahi karte.

4) Reaction of Non-Metals with Salt Solutions
Yahan jab ek more reactive non-metal, salt solution of less reactive non-metal ke sath react karta hai tab more reactive non-metal, less reactive non-metal ko displace kar apna salt solution form karta hai. In other words, a more reactive non-metal displaces a less reactive non-metal from its salt solution. For example jab hum chlorine ko sodium bromide solution ke sath react karte hai tab yahan sodium chloride aur bromine ka formation hota hai.
ocr_image


Iss displacement reaction meh chlorine more reactive non-metal, less reactive non-metal bromine ko sodium bromide solution se displace karta hai.

5) Reaction of Non-Metals with Chlorine
Non-metals jab chlorine ke sath react karte hai tab ye covalent chlorides form karte hai jo non-electrolytes hote hai matlab ye electricity conduct nahi karte. Non-metal chlorides generally liquid or gases hote hai. For example
(i) Hydrogen non-metal jab chlorine ke sath react karta hai tab ye covalent chloride called hydrogen chloride (HCl) form karta hai.
ocr_image


(ii) Phosphorus non-metal jab chlorine ke sath react karta hai tab ye covalent chloride called phosphorus trichloride (PCl3) form karta hai.
ocr_image


Iss reaction meh kuch amount phosphorus pentachloride (PCl5) bhi form hota hai. Similarly, jab hum carbon non-metal ko chlorine ke sath react karte hai tab ye covalent chloride called carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) form karta hai aur ye bhi electricity conduct nahi karta. Non metals apne electrons chlorine atoms ko donate kar chloride ions form nahi karte iss wajah se ye covalent chlorides form karte hai.

6) Reaction of Non-Metals with Hydrogen
Non-metals jab hydrogen ke sath react karte hai tab ye covalent hydrides form karte hai kyunki ye hydrides sharing of electrons matlab covalent bonding se form hote hai. For example
(i) Sulphur non-metal jab hydrogen ke sath react karta hai tab ye covalent hydride called hydrogen sulphide (H2S) form karta hai. Hydrogen sulphide gas ki characteristic rotten eggs like smell hoti hai.
ocr_image


(ii) Nitrogen non-metal jab hydrogen ke sath in the presence of iron catalyst react karta hai tab ye covalent hydride called ammonia (NH3) form karta hai.
ocr_image


Moreover, oxygen, carbon, chlorine non-metals bhi hydrogen ke sath reaction par water (H2O), methane (CH4), hydrogen chloride (HCl) respectively hydrides form karte hai. Ab non-metal hydrides covalent hote hai matlab ye sharing of electrons se form hote hai. Since, non metals apne electrons hydrogen atoms ko donate kar hydride ions form nahi karte iss wajah se ye covalent hydrides form karte hai. Non metal hydrides bhi liquids aur gases hote hai. Non-metal hydrides meh ions present nahi hote iss wajah se ye electricity conduct nahi karte aur non-metal hydrides stable compounds hote hai.

Chemical Properties of Non-Metals

The important chemical properties of non-metals are :

1) Reaction of Non-Metals with Oxygen
Non-metals react with oxygen to form acidic oxides or neutral oxides. Carbon and sulphur form acidic oxides CO2,SO2 and hydrogen form neutral oxide H2O. The non-metal oxides are covalent in nature which are formed by the sharing of electrons. The acidic oxides of non-metals dissolve in water to form acids. The acidic oxides of non-metals turn blue litmus solution to red. For example
(i) Carbon non-metal on reaction with oxygen forms acidic oxide called carbon dioxide. This acidic oxide dissolves in water to form an acid called carbonic acid.

ocr_image


A solution of carbon dioxide gas in water turns blue litmus to red, showing that it is acidic in nature.
(ii) Similarly when we treat sulphur non-metal with oxygen it forms acidic oxide called sulphur dioxide. This acidic oxide dissolves in water to form an acid called sulphurous acid.
ocr_image


A solution of sulphur dioxide in water turns blue litmus to red. This shows that sulphur dioxide is acidic in nature.

We can Confirm this by Performing an Experiment
(a) Take a small amount of sulphur powder in a combustion spoon and heat it over the flame of a burner. After some time, the sulphur will start burning with a blue flame. Then we move this spoon to a gas jar and allow sulphur to burn there. Sulphur burns in the air of a gas jar to form a pungent smelling gas, sulphur dioxide. After all the sulphur has burnt, remove the combustion spoon from the gas jar and cover it with a lid. The gas jar now contains sulphur dioxide gas.
(b) We now put some water in the gas jar, cover it with a lid and shake it to dissolve sulphur dioxide gas. Let us divide this solution into two parts by putting it in two test-tubes.
(c) To the first test tube we add blue litmus solution or test it with moist blue litmus paper then we observe that blue colour changes to red which indicates that sulphur dioxide solution is acidic in nature.
Due to this, when we perform the red litmus solution or moist red litmus paper test with the second test tube then there is no colour change observed.
ocr_image


Moreover, CO2 solution shows a similar colour change with litmus solution.

Some non-metal oxides are neutral means they are neither acidic nor basic like carbon monoxide (CO), water (H2O), nitrogen monoxide (NO), and dinitrogen monoxide (N2O). These oxides do not turn red litmus solution blue or blue litmus solution red. Now consider the formation of these oxides :
(i) When we treat Carbon non-metal with insufficient oxygen then it forms neutral oxide called carbon monoxide. Moreover, this neutral oxide, carbon monoxide does not produce an acid with water.
ocr_image


(ii) Similarly when we treat Hydrogen non-metal with oxygen then it forms neutral oxide called water which is also known as hydrogen oxide. Generally, non-metal oxides are formed by the sharing of electrons, so they are covalent compounds.
ocr_image


2) Reaction of Non-Metals with Water
Non-metal do not react with water (or steam) to evolve hydrogen gas. This is because non-metals cannot give electrons to reduce the hydrogen ions of water into hydrogen gas.

3) Reaction of Non-Metals with Dilute Acids
Non-metals do not react with dilute acids. In other words, non-metals do not displace hydrogen from acids. For example, the non-metals like carbon, sulphur and phosphorus do not react with dilute hydrochloric acid (HCl) or dilute sulphuric acid (H2SO4) to produce hydrogen gas. So Why non-metals are not able to displace hydrogen from acids ? In order to displace hydrogen ions (H+) of an acid and convert them into hydrogen gas, electrons should be supplied to the hydrogen ions (H+) of the acid. Now, a non-metal, being itself an acceptor of electrons, cannot give electrons to the hydrogen ions of the acid to reduce them to hydrogen gas and hence the non-metals are not able to displace hydrogen ions from acids to form hydrogen gas. Thus, if non-metals like carbon, sulphur or phosphorus are put into a test-tube containing dilute sulphuric acid (or dilute hydrochloric acid), then no hydrogen gas is evolved.

4) Reaction of Non-Metals with Salt Solutions
When a more reactive non-metal reacts with a salt solution of a less reactive non-metal, then the more reactive non-metal displaces the less reactive non-metal from its salt solution and forms its own salt solution. In other words, a more reactive non-metals displaces a less reactive non-metal from its salt solution. For example when chlorine is passed through a solution of sodium bromide, then sodium chloride and bromine are formed.
ocr_image


In this reaction, a more reactive non-metal chlorine is displacing a less reactive non-metal bromine from its salt solution sodium bromide.

5) Reaction of Non-Metals with Chlorine
Non-metals react with chlorine to form covalent chlorides which are non-electrolytes (do not conduct electricity). Non-metal chlorides are usually liquids or gases. For example
(i) Hydrogen non-metal on reaction with chlorine forms covalent chloride called hydrogen chloride (HCl).
ocr_image


(ii) Similarly, phosphorus non-metal on reaction with chlorine forms covalent chloride called phosphorus trichloride (PCl3).
ocr_image


In this reaction, a small amount of phosphorus pentachloride (PCl5) is also formed. Similarly we treat carbon non-metal with chlorine it forms covalent chloride called carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) and it also does not conduct electricity. Since non-metals form covalent chlorides because they cannot give electrons to chlorine atoms to form chloride ions.

6) Reaction of Non-Metals with Hydrogen
Non-metals react with hydrogen to form covalent hydrides. The non-metal hydrides are formed by the sharing of electrons, that is, non-metal hydrides are formed by covalent bonding. For example
(i) When sulphur non-metal reacts with hydrogen it forms covalent hydride called hydrogen sulphide (H2S) which has a characteristic smell of rotten eggs.
ocr_image


(ii) Similarly when nitrogen non-metal reacts with hydrogen in the presence of iron catalyst it forms covalent hydride called ammonia (NH3).
ocr_image


Moreover, oxygen, carbon, chlorine non-metals on reaction with hydrogen form water (H2O), methane (CH4), hydrogen chloride (HCl) hydrides. The non-metal hydrides are covalent compounds formed by sharing of electrons because non-metal atoms cannot give electrons to hydrogen atoms to form hydride ions. Non metal hydrides are liquids and gases. Non-metal hydrides do not contain ions and hence they do not conduct electricity. Also, non-metal hydrides are stable compounds.

Hello Points!

The differences in Physical Properties of Metal & Non-metals

ocr_image


The differences in Chemical Properties of Metal & Non-metals
ocr_image

EXAMPLE 2

An element reacts with oxygen to form an oxide which dissolves in dilute hydrochloric acid. The oxide formed also turns a solution of red litmus blue. Is the element a metal or a non-metal ? Explain your answer.

Here the oxide of given element dissolves in an acid, therefore, the oxide must be basic in nature. Since, the oxide turns red litmus solution to blue, this also confirms that the oxide is basic in nature. Now, basic oxides are formed by metals, so the element in this case is a metal.

EXAMPLE 3

If copper metal is heated over a flame, it develops a coating. What is the colour and composition of this coating ?

When copper metal is heated over a flame, it develops a coating which is of black colour and it is of copper (II) oxide or (CuO).

2Cu+O22CuO

EXAMPLE 4

When a metal X is treated with cold water, it gives a basic salt Y with molecular formula XOH (molecular mass =40) and liberates a gas Z which easily catches fire. Identify X,Y and Z and also write the reaction involved.

Molecular formula of Y=XOH
Let atomic weight of metal X is a.
Then, molecular mass of XOH=a+16+1=40 (Given)
a=4017=23
Thus, metal X is sodium (Na) because 23 is the atomic weight of sodium metal. Sodium reacts with as

2NaX+2H2OCold2NaOHY+H2Z

Sodium (Na) gives hydrogen gas (Z) on reaction with cold water.
So, Y is NaOH (sodium hydroxide)
Z is H2 (hydrogen gas).

EXAMPLE 5

Of the three metals X,Y and Z here X reacts with cold water, Y with hot water and Z with steam only. Identify X,Y and Z and also arrange them in order of increasing reactivity.

X is sodium or potassium (NaorK) as it reacts with cold water.

2Na+2H2OCold water2NaOHSodiumhydroxide+H2

Y is magnesium (Mg) as it reacts with hot water.
Mg+2H2OHot waterMg(OH)2Magnesiumhydroxide+H2

Z is iron (Fe) as it reacts with steam.
3Fe+4H2OSteamFe3O4Iron(II, III)oxide+4H2

Increasing order of reactivity
Z<Y<XorFe<Mg<Na/K

EXAMPLE 6

(i) Choose one metal from the reactivity series which will not react with steam.
(ii) Choose one metal from the reactivity series which will safely react with dilute sulphuric acid.
(iii) Name the salt formed when your chosen metal in (ii) reacts with sulphuric acid.

(i) Gold (Au) will not react with steam under any conditions.
(ii) Zinc (Zn) will safely react with dilute sulphuric acid.
(iii) The salt formed is zinc sulphate (ZnSO4) and its solution is colourless.

Zn(s)+H2SO4(aq)ZnSO4(aq)colourless+H2(g)

EXAMPLE 7

Give reasons for the following :
Metals replace hydrogen from dilute acids whereas non-metals do not.

Metals are electropositive in nature. Their atoms readily lose electrons to form positive ions. The electrons are accepted by H+ ions of the acid to evolve hydrogen gas. For example,

Zn(s)Zn2+(aq)+2e
2H+(aq)+2eH2(g)

Non-metals are electronegative in nature. This means that their atoms can take up electrons and cannot lose them. Therefore, they do not evolve hydrogen on reacting with dilute acids.

Uses of Metals

Ab metals ko hum different forms meh use kar sakte hai.
1) Copper aur aluminium ko hum electric wires making ke liye use karte hai, kyunki ye low electrical resistance show karte hai iss wajah se ye good conductor of electricity hote hai.
2) Iron, copper, aluminium ko hum house-hold utensils aur factory items making ke liye use karte hai.
3) Iron ko hum Haber’s process meh as catalyst bhi use karte hai.
4) Chromium aur nickel metals ko hum stainless steel making ke liye use karte hai.
5) Aluminium foils ko hum medicines, food materials packaging ke liye use karte hai.
6) Silver aur Gold metals ko hum jewellery making ke liye use karte hai aur inki thin foils ko hum sweet decoration meh bhi use karte hai.
7) Liquid metal mercury ko hum thermometers making ke liye use karte hai.
8) Sodium, titanium, zirconium metals ko hum atomic energy aur space science projects meh use karte hai.
9) Lead ko hum lead batteries meh use karte hai.

ocr_image
Figure : Some of the uses of Metals

Uses of Metals

Metals are used for a large number of purposes. Some of the uses of metals are given below :
1) Copper and aluminium metals are used to make wires to carry electric current. This is because copper and aluminium have very low electrical resistance and hence very good conductors of electricity.
2) Iron, copper and aluminium metals are used to make house-hold utensils and factory equipment.
3) Iron is used as a catalyst in the preparation of ammonia gas by Haber's process.
4) Chromium and nickel metals are used for electroplating and in the manufacture of stainless steel.
5) The aluminium foils are used in packaging of medicines, cigarettes and food materials.
6) Silver and gold metals are used to make jewellery. The thin foils made of silver and gold are used to decorate sweets.
7) The liquid metal 'mercury' is used in making thermometers.
8) Sodium, titanium and zirconium metals are used in atomic energy (nuclear energy) and space science projects.
9) Lead metal is used in making car batteries.

Uses of Non-Metals

Ab hum non-metals ke uses consider karte hai.
1) Hydrogen ko hum vegetable oils ke hydrogenation ke liye use karte hai jo hume vegetable ghee deta hai (or vanaspati ghee).
2) Hydrogen ko hum ammonia making ke liye bhi use karte hai jiske help se hum further fertilisers form karte hai.
3) Liquid hydrogen ko hum rocket fuel ke liye bhi use karte hai.
4) Carbon in graphite form ko hum electrolytic cell aur dry cell ke electrodes making ke liye use karte hai.
5) Nitrogen ko hum ammonia, nitric acid aur fertilisers making ke liye use karte hai.
6) Ab nitrogen kyunki inert hota hai iss wajah se inko hum food material ko preserve karne ke liye bhi use karte hai.
7) Sulphur ko hum sulfuric acid making ke liye use karte hai.
8) Sulfur ko hum as fungicides aur gun powder ke liye bhi use karte hai.
9) Iske sath sulphur ko hum vulcanisation ke liye bhi use karte hai.

ocr_image
Figure : Some of the uses of Non-metals

Uses of Non-Metals

The important uses of non-metals are as follows :
1) Hydrogen is used in the hydrogenation of vegetable oils to make vegetable ghee (or vanaspati ghee).
2) Hydrogen is used in the manufacture of ammonia (whose compounds are used as fertilisers).
3) Liquid hydrogen is used as a rocket fuel.
4) Carbon (in the form of graphite) is used for making the electrodes of electrolytic cells and dry cells.
5) Nitrogen is used in the manufacture of ammonia, nitric acid and fertilisers.
6) Due to its inertness, nitrogen is used to preserve food materials.
7) Sulphur is used for manufacturing sulphuric add.
8) Sulphur is used as a fungicide and in making gun powder.
9) Sulphur is used in the vulcanisation of rubber.

How do Metals and Non-metals React ?

Jab metals aur non-metals aapas mein react karte hai tab ye ionic compounds (contain ionic bonds) form karte hai aur jab ek non-metal dusre non-metal ke sath react karta hai tab ye covalent compounds (contain covalent bonds) form karte hai. Lekin ek metal dusre metal ke sath react nahi karta.
Ab hum dekhte hai ki chemical bond kya hota hai ?
Jab same or different elements ke atoms sath meh combine hote hai tab ye molecules form karte hai. Tab inn atoms (or ions) ke beech force of attraction developed hoti jo inn atoms ko sath meh rakhti hai aur iss force of attraction ko hum chemical bond (or bond) bolte hai. Ab metals aur non-metals atoms ke beech or 2 non-metals atoms ke beech kaun sa bond form hota hai isko samjhne ke liye pehle hume ye pta hona chaiye ki noble gases unreactive (or inert) kyun hoti hai.

Inertness of Noble gases
Periodic table ke group 18 elements Helium, Neon, Argon, Krypton, Xenon, Radon kisi dusre elements ke sath react nahi karte matlab ye koi compound formation nahi karte hai iss wajah se inko hum noble gases or inert gases bolte hai kyunki ye unreactive hote hai. Aisa kyun hota hai ? Since, kisi bhi atom ke outermost electrons hi chemical reaction meh participate karte hai lekin agar hum noble gas ki electronic configuration consider kare :

ocr_image


So, iss table meh agar hum outermost shell ke number of electrons dekhe toh yahan inert gas helium meh 2 electrons hai aur baki inert gases ke outermost shell meh 8 electrons hai. Since atoms of inert gases stable hote hai aur inke outermost shell meh 8 electrons (or 2 electrons) present hote hai, iss wajah se we can say agar kisi atom ke outermost shell meh 8 electrons (or 2 electrons) present ho tab wo most stable arragement of electrons hoti hai. Yahan se hum ye conclude kar sakte hai ki jin atoms ke outermost shell meh 8 electrons (or 2 electrons) present hote hai wo stable aur unreactive hote hai. Iske alawa agar kisi atom ke first shell (K shell) meh 2 electrons ho aur baki kisi shell meh koi electron present na ho tab bhi wo atom stability ko favor karta hai like Helium.
Ab agar kisi atom ke outermost shell meh 8 electrons present ho tab usko hum octet of electrons bolte hai, accordingly most inert gases ke paas octet of electrons hota hai. Similarly, jab kisi atom ke outermost K shell meh 2 electrons present ho tab usko hum duplet of electrons bolte hai like Helium. Ab kyunki noble gas atoms very stable electron arrangement show karte hai iss wajah se inke outermost shell se na toh hum electron remove kar sakte hai aur na hi isme electrons add kar sakte hai. Due to this noble gas atom ke outermost electrons chemical reaction meh participate nahi karte hai.

Cause of Chemical Bonding (or Chemical Combination)
Jab kisi atom ke paas inert gas electron arrangement hoti hai tab wo atom stable hota hai. Ab iss inert gas arrangement of electrons ko achieve karne ke liye same or different elements ke atoms aapas meh chemical bonds form karte hai. Yahan atoms chemical bonds iss tarah form karte hai so that each atom ke outermost shell meh 8 electrons or 2 electrons outermost K shell meh present ho. In other words, jin atoms ke outermost shell meh less than 8 electrons (or less than 2 electrons) hote hai, wo unstable hote hai. So, sabhi atoms ke paas inert gas arrangement of 8 electrons (or 2 electrons) ko achieve karne ki aur stability gain karne ki tendency hoti hai. Ab iss arrangement of electrons ko achieve karne ke liye 3 tarike hote hai :
(i) by losing one or more electrons (to another atom)
(ii) by gaining one or more electrons (from another atom)
(iii) by sharing one or more electrons (with another atom)


Jis chemical reaction meh inert gas electron arrangement ki achievement loss or gain of electrons between atoms ki wajah se ho tab wahan reaction metals aur non-metals atoms ke beech hoti hai. On the other hand, jab chemical reaction meh inert gas electron arrangement ki achievement sharing of electrons between atoms ki wajah se ho tab wahan reaction 2 non-metals atoms ke beech hoti hai. Ab metals aur non-metals ke beech chemical reaction ko samjhne ke liye hume pehle ions kya hote hai aur ye kaise form hote hai ye pta hona chahiye.

How do Metals and Non-metals React ?

When metals react with non-metals they form ionic compounds (contain ionic bonds) and when non-metals react with other non-metals, then they form covalent compounds (contain covalent bonds). However metals do not react with other metals.
Now we consider what is chemical bond ?
When atoms of the elements combine to form molecules, a force of attraction is developed between the atoms (or ions) which holds them together. The force which links the atoms (or ions) in a molecule is called a chemical bond (or bond). In order to understand the formation of chemical bonds between the atoms of metals and non-metals or between the atoms of two non-metals, it is necessary to know the reason for the unreactive nature (or inertness) of noble gases.

Inertness of Noble gases
There are some elements in group 18 of the periodic table which do not combine with other elements. These elements are : Helium, Neon, Argon, Krypton, Xenon, Radon. They are known as noble gases or inert gases because they are unreactive and do not react with other elements to form compounds. Now why does this happen ? Since it is known that only the outermost electrons of an atom take part in a chemical reaction and if we consider noble gas electronic configuration.

ocr_image


When we look at the number of electrons in the outermost shells of the inert gases (in the table given above), we find that only one inert gas helium has 2 electrons in its outermost shell, all other inert gases have 8 electrons in the outermost shells of their atoms. Since in the outermost shell of inert gas 8 electrons (2 electrons) are present which is the most stable arrangement of electrons, due to this inert gases are unreactive. It is very important to note here that though 8 electrons in the outermost shell always impart stability to an atom, but 2 electrons in the outermost shell impart stability only when the outermost shell is the first shell (K shell), and no other shells are present in the atom like Helium.
To have 8 electrons in the outermost shell of an atom is known as octet of electrons. Most of the inert gases have octet of electrons in their valence shells. To have 2 electrons in the outermost K shell is known as duplet of electrons. Helium is the only inert gas having a duplet of electrons in its valence shell. Since noble gases have very stable electron arrangement because of this it is not possible to remove or add electrons from or to the outermost shell of a noble gas atom. Due to this the outermost electrons of a noble gas atom cannot take part in chemical reactions.

Cause of Chemical Bonding (or Chemical Combination)
In case of atoms, stability means having the electron arrangement of an inert gas. For this atoms form chemical bonds to achieve stability by acquiring the inert gas electron configuration. So, when atoms combine to form chemical bonds, they do so in such a way that each atom gets 8 electrons in its outermost shell or 2 electrons in the outermost K shell. In other words, the atoms having less than 8 electrons (or less than 2 electrons) in their outermost shell are unstable. So, all the atoms have a tendency to achieve the inert gas electron arrangement of 8 electrons (or 2 electrons) in their outermost shells and become more stable. It can be done in 3 ways :
(i) by losing one or more electrons (to another atom)
(ii) by gaining one or more electrons (from another atom)
(iii) by sharing one or more electrons (with another atom)


The chemical reactions in which the inert gas electron arrangement is achieved by the loss and gain of electrons (or transfer of electrons) between atoms, take place between metals and non-metals. On the other hand, the chemical reactions in which the inert gas electron configuration is achieved by the sharing of electrons between atoms, take place between 2 non-metals. In order to understand the reactions between metals and non-metals, it is necessary to know the meaning of the term ions and how they are formed.

IONS

Ion ek electrically charged atom (or group of atoms) hota hai. For example sodium ion (Na+), magnesium ion (Mg+2), chloride ion (Cl), oxide ion (O2). Atom se jab generally loss or gain of electrons hota hai tab ek ion form hota hai, matlab tab isme unequal number of electrons aur protons present hote hai. Ions 2 types ke hote hai - Cations aur Anions

1) Positively charged ion ko hum cation bolte hai jaise sodium ion (Na+) aur magnesium ion (Mg+2), cations hai kyunki ye positively charged ions hai. Cations commonly one or more electrons ke loss se form hote hai. For example sodium atom 1 electron lose karne ke baad sodium ion (Na+) form karta hai.

ocr_image


Ab kyunki cation tab form hota hai jab atom se electrons ka removal hota hai, jiska matlab cation meh normal atom ki respect meh less number of electrons hote hai. Iske sath hume ye pta hai ki normal atom meh number of protons aur electrons same hote hai aur kyunki cation loss of electrons se form hota hai iss wajah se we can say that cation meh electrons ka number proton ki respect meh less hota hai. Cations meh sirf hydrogen ion (H+) aur ammonium ion (NH+4) hi non-metals cations hote hai.

2) Similarly negatively charged ion ko hum anion bolte hai jaise chloride ion (Cl) aur oxide ion (O2), anions hai kyunki ye negatively charged ions hai. Anions commonly one or more electrons ke gain se form hote hai. For example chlorine atom 1 electron gain karne ke baad chloride ion (Cl) form karta hai.
ocr_image


Ab kyunki anion tab form hota hai jab atom meh electrons ka addition hota hai, jiska matlab anion meh normal atom ki respect meh more number of electrons hote hai. Iske sath hume ye pta hai ki normal atom meh number of protons aur electrons same hote hai aur kyunki anion gain of electrons se form hota hai iss wajah se we can say that anion meh electrons ka number proton ki respect meh jyada hota hai. Sabhi non-metal elements ke ions - anions hote hai except hydrogen ion and ammonium ion.

IONS

An ion is an electrically charged atom (or group of atoms). Examples of the ions are : sodium ion, (Na+), magnesium ion, (Mg+2), chloride ion, (Cl), and oxide ion (O2). An ion is formed by the loss or gain of electrons by an atom, so it contains an unequal number of electrons and protons. There are two types of ions : cations and anions.

1) A positively charged ion is known as cation. Sodium ion, (Na+) and magnesium ion, (Mg+2), are cations because they are positively charged ions. A cation is formed by the loss of one or more electrons by an atom. For example, sodium atom loses 1 electron to form a sodium ion, (Na+), which is a cation.

ocr_image


Since a cation is formed by the removal of electrons from an atom, therefore, a cation contains less electrons than a normal atom. Also it is known that a normal atom contains an equal number of protons and electrons. Now, since a cation is formed by the loss of one or more electrons by an atom, therefore, a cation contains less electrons than protons. The ions of all the metal elements are cations. Only the hydrogen ion, (H+) and ammonium ion, (NH+4), are the cations formed from non-metals.

2) A negatively charged ion is known as anion. Chloride ion, (Cl), and oxide ion, (O2), are anions because they are negatively charged ions. An anion is formed by the gain of one or more electrons by an atom. For example, a chlorine atom gains (accepts) 1 electron to form a chloride ion, (Cl), which is an anion
ocr_image


Since an anion is formed by the addition of electrons to an atom, therefore, an anion contains more electrons than a normal atom. Also it is known that a normal atom contains an equal number of protons and electrons. Now, since an anion is formed by the addition of one or more electrons to an atom, therefore, an anion contains more electrons than protons. The ions of all the non-metal elements are anions (except hydrogen ion and ammonium ion).

Formation of Positive Ions (or Cations)

Jab kisi element ke outermost shell meh 1, 2, or 3 electrons present ho tab ye elements inn electrons ko lose kar inert gas electron arrangement (or 8 valence electrons) achieve kar sakte hai aur tab ye positively charged ion or cation form karte hai. Ab metals ke outermost shell meh 1, 2, or 3 electrons hote hai, iss wajah se metal atoms 1, 2, or 3 electrons lose kar positively charged ion or cations form kar sakte hai. For example lithium, sodium, magnesium, calcium, aluminium etc., metals electrons lose kar positive ions form kar sakte hai aur inn metals ke outermost shell meh jitne electrons present hote hai utna hi positive units charge ye cation par generate karte hai.

Formation of Sodium Ion, (Na+)
Sodium metal ka atomic number 11 hota hai, matlab iske 1 atom meh 11 electrons hote hai. Sodium ki electronic configuration K2,L8,M1 hoti hai, which means iske outermost M shell meh 1 electron present hai. Ye stable arrangement of electrons nahi hai, stable arrangement ke liye atoms ke outermost shell meh usually 8 electrons hote hai. Iss wajah se sodium atom less stable aur more reactive hota hai. Ab stability gain karne ke liye sodium atom apna 1 electron kisi dusre atom (like chlorine) ko donate karta hai. In this way, M shell se 1 electron remove ho jata hai aur sodium atom stable arrangement of electrons (8 valence electrons) achieve karta hai. Sodium atom 1 electron lose kar sodium ion (Na+) (1 unit positive charge) form karta hai.

ocr_image


Since sodium ion (Na+) ki electronic configuration noble gas - neon jaisi hai aur kyunki neon gas stable arrangement of electrons show karti iss wajah se sodium ion bhi sodium atom se jyada stable aur less reactive hota hai.
Now proton ka matlab 1 unit positive charge aur electron ka matlab 1 unit negative charge hota hai. Ab sodium atom meh equal number of protons aur electrons hote hai iss wajah se sodium atom electrically neutral hota hai. Lekin sodium ion (Na+) meh 11 protons aur 10 electrons hote hai matlab ye 1 electron lose karne ke baad form hota hai. Ab kyunki sodium (Na+) ion meh electrons ke comparison 1 proton jyada hai iss wajah se sodium ion (Na+) par 1 unit positive charge present hota hai.
ocr_image
Figure : Diagram to show the formation of a sodium ion


Yahan lithium aur potassium ion ka formation bhi sodium ion ki tarah hota hai. Since lithium ka atomic number 3 hota hai aur iski electronic configuration K2,L1 hoti hai which is unstable, lekin jab ye 1 electron lose karta hai tab ye lithium ion (Li+) form kar stable helium noble gas configuration achieve karta hai K2. Similarly potassium ka atomic number 19 hota hai aur iski electronic configuration K2,L8,M8,N1 hoti hai which is unstable aur potassium atom bhi jab 1 electron lose karta hai tab ye potassium (K+) ion form kar argon noble gas configuration ko achieve karta hai K2,L8,M8.

Formation of Magnesium Ion, (Mg+2)
Ab agar hum magnesium metal consider kare toh iska atomic number 12 hota hai aur iski electronic configuration K2,L8,M2 hoti hai. Ab kyunki iske outermost valence shell meh 2 electrons present hai jo ye dusre atom ko donate kar magnesium ion (Mg+2) form kar sakta hai having 2 units positive charge.
ocr_image


Since magnesium ion (Mg+2) ki electronic configuration noble gas - neon jaisi hai aur kyunki neon gas stable arrangement of electrons show karti iss wajah se magnesium ion bhi magnesium atom se jyada stable aur less reactive hota hai.
Magnesium atom meh equal number of protons aur electrons hote hai iss wajah se magnesium atom electrically neutral hota hai. Lekin magnesium ion (Mg+2) meh 12 protons aur 10 electrons hote hai matlab ye 2 electrons lose karne ke baad form hota hai. Ab kyunki magnesium (Mg+2) ion meh electrons ke comparison 2 protons jyada hai iss wajah se magnesium ion (Mg+2) par 2 units positive charge present hote hai.
Moreover, calcium ion ka formation bhi magnesium ion ki tarah hota hai kyunki calcium ke outermost shell meh bhi 2 electrons present hote hai. Calcium ka atomic number 20 hota hai aur iski electronic configuration K2,L8,M8,N2 hoti hai. So jab ye 2 electrons ko lose karta hai tab ye stable argon inert gas electron arrangement ko achieve kar calcium ion (Ca+2) form karta hai aur tab iski configuration K2,L8,M8 hoti hai.

Formation of Aluminium Ion, (Al+3)
Aluminium metal ka atomic number 13 hota hai aur accordingly iski electronic configuration K2,L8,M3 hoti hai. Yahan aluminium atom ke outermost shell meh 3 electrons present hai jo ye dusre atom ko donate kar aluminium ion Al+3 form kar sakta hai having 3 units positive charge.
ocr_image


Since aluminium ion (Al+3) ki electronic configuration noble gas - neon jaisi hai aur kyunki neon gas stable arrangement of electrons show karti iss wajah se aluminium ion bhi aluminium atom se jyada stable aur less reactive hota hai.
Aluminium atom meh equal number of protons aur electrons hote hai accordingly aluminium atom electrically neutral hota hai. Lekin aluminium ion (Al+3) meh 13 protons aur 10 electrons hote hai matlab ye 3 electrons lose karne ke baad form hota hai. Ab kyunki aluminium (Al+3) ion meh electrons ke comparison 3 protons jyada hai iss wajah se aluminium ion (Al+3) par 3 units positive charge present hote hai.

Electron Dot Representation
Kisi bhi atom ke outermost electrons chemical bonding meh participate karte hai aur inn electrons ko hum valence electrons bolte hai. Valence electrons ko hum element ke symbol ke sath dot () se represent karte hai. For example sodium, magnesium, aluminium atom ke paas 1, 2, 3 valence electrons respectively hote hai iss wajah se inko hum Na,Mg:,Al: respectively se represent karte hai. Moreover, inke ions ke paas koi valence electrons nahi hota hai iss wajah se tab hum inke ions ke sath dot () use nahi karte. Ab kisi element ka electron dot structure likhne ke liye uss elements ke paas kitne valence electrons hai ye hume pta hona chahiye.
ocr_image
Figure : Some common metal elements that form positive ions (or Cations)

Formation of Positive Ions (or Cations)

If an element has 1, 2 or 3 electrons in the outermost shell of its atoms, then it loses these electrons to achieve the inert gas electron arrangement of eight valence electrons and form positively charged ions or cations. Now, the metal atoms usually have 1, 2 or 3 electrons in the outermost shell, so the metal atoms lose electrons to form positively charged ions or cations. For example, lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium and aluminium, etc., are all metals which donate their outermost electrons to form positive ions. Here, it is noted that in case of an atom having 1, 2, or 3 electrons in its outermost shell, then it loses these 1, 2, or 3 electrons to form a cation having 1, 2, or 3 units positive charge.

Formation of Sodium Ion, (Na+)
Sodium metal has atomic number 11, which means 1 atom of sodium has 11 electrons. The electronic configuration of sodium will be K2,L8,M1, which indicates that sodium atom has 1 electron in its outermost M shell. This is not a stable arrangement of electrons. A stable arrangement has usually 8 electrons in its outermost shell. Thus, a sodium atom is not very stable, it is very reactive. In order to become more stable, sodium atom donates its 1 outermost electron to some other atom (like that of chlorine). In this way, the whole M shell is removed and it achieves stable electron arrangement (8 valence electrons). By losing 1 electron, the sodium atom gets 1 unit of positive charge and becomes a sodium ion, (Na+).

ocr_image


The electronic configuration of a sodium ion (Na+) is the same as that of the nearest inert gas neon and neon has the most stable electron configuration, due to this sodium ion (Na+) is more stable and less reactive than sodium atom.
A proton has 1 unit positive charge whereas an electron has 1 unit negative charge. A sodium atom (Na) contains 11 protons and 11 electrons, therefore it is electrically neutral. In the sodium ion (Na+) there are 11 protons but only 10 electrons (because 1 electron has been given out). This means that in a sodium ion (Na+) there is 1 proton more than electrons. Due to 1 more proton than electrons, a sodium ion has 1 unit positive charge (Na+).
ocr_image
Figure : Diagram to show the formation of a sodium ion


The formation of lithium and potassium ion is similar to the formation of a sodium ion because like sodium atom, the potassium and lithium atom also has 1 electron in their outermost shell. Since lithium has atomic number 3 and its electronic configuration is K2,L1 which is unstable, but when it loses 1 electron it forms lithium (Li+) ion. Then it achieves a stable helium noble gas configuration K2. Similarly, potassium has atomic number 19 and its electronic configuration is K2,L8,M8,N1 which is also unstable, but when it loses 1 electron it form potassium (K+) ion. Then it achieves a stable argon noble gas configuration K2,L8,M8.

Formation of Magnesium Ion, (Mg+2)
The atomic number of magnesium is 12, so its electronic configuration is K2,L8,M2. It has 2 electrons in its valence shell. The magnesium atom donates its 2 outermost electrons and forms a magnesium ion (Mg+2) having 2 units of positive charge.
ocr_image


The magnesium ion (Mg+2) has the neon inert gas electron structure of 8 electrons in the outermost shell, so it is more stable than a magnesium atom. The number of protons and electrons in a magnesium atom is equal (12 each), so a magnesium atom is electrically neutral. A magnesium ion (Mg+2) contains 12 protons but only 10 electrons so it has 2 protons more than electrons due to this it has 2 units of positive charge.
Moreover, calcium ion formation is similar to magnesium ion because calcium also has 2 electrons in its outermost shell. Calcium has atomic number 20 and its electronic configuration will be K2,L8,M8,N2 which is unstable, but when it loses 2 electrons it forms calcium (Ca+2) ion. Then it achieves a stable argon noble gas configuration K2,L8,M8.

Formation of Aluminium Ion, (Al+3)
The atomic number of aluminium is 13, so its electronic configuration is K2,L8,M3. It has 3 electrons in its valence shell. The aluminium atom donates its 3 outermost electrons to other atom and forms an aluminium ion (Al+3) having 3 units of positive charge.
ocr_image


The aluminium ion (Al+3) has the neon inert gas electron structure of 8 electrons in the outermost shell, so it is more stable than a aluminium atom. The number of protons and electrons in a aluminium atom is equal (13 each), so a aluminium atom is electrically neutral. An aluminium ion (Al+3) contains 13 protons but only 10 electrons so it has 3 protons more than electrons due to this it has 3 units of positive charge.

Electron Dot Representation
Only the outermost electrons of an atom take part in chemical bonding which are known as valence electrons. The valence electrons in an atom are represented by putting dot () on the symbol of the element, one dot for each valence electron. For example sodium, magnesium, aluminium atoms have 1, 2, 3 valence electrons respectively which are represented as Na,Mg:,Al: respectively. Moreover, their ions do not have any valence electrons so for their ions we do not use dot (). In order to write the electron dot structures, we should know the number of valence electrons in an atom.
ocr_image
Figure : Some common metal elements that form positive ions (or Cations)

Formation of Negative Ions (or Anions)

Jab kisi element ke outermost shell meh 5, 6, or 7 electrons present ho tab ye elements 3, 2, or 1 electrons respectively ko gain kar inert gas electron arrangement or 8 valence electrons ko achieve kar sakte hai aur tab ye negatively charged ion or anion form karte hai. Ab non-metals ke outermost shell meh 5, 6, or 7 electrons hote hai, iss wajah se non-metal atoms 3, 2, or 1 electrons respectively gain kar negatively charged ions or anions form kar sakte hai. For example fluorine, chlorine, bromine, oxygen, nitrogen, phosphorus etc., non-metals electrons gain kar negative ions form sakte hai aur non-metals inert gas configuration ke liye jitne electrons gain karte hai utna hi negative units charge ye anion par generate karte hai. Moreover, carbon bhi ek non-metal element hai aur iske outermost shell meh 4 electrons hote hai, lekin carbon element energy difference ki wajah se na toh 4 electrons gain aur na hi 4 electrons lose kar sakta hai. So, carbon atom ions form nahi karta.

Formation of Chloride Ion, (Cl)
Chlorine non-metal ka atomic number 17 hota hai, matlab iske 1 atom meh 17 electrons hote hai. Chlorine atom ki electronic configuration K2,L8,M7 hoti hai, so iske outermost M shell meh 7 electrons present hai. Ab chlorine atom ko stable 8-electron inert gas configuration gain karne ke liye 1 more electron required hota hai. So, stability gain karne ke liye chlorine atom kisi dusre atom (like sodium) se 1 electron accept karta hai aur tab ye argon inert gas configuration K2,L8,M8 achieve karta hai. Chlorine atom 1 electron gain kar chloride ion (Cl) (1 unit negative charge) form karta hai.

ocr_image


Since chloride ion (Cl) ki electronic configuration noble gas - argon jaisi hai aur kyunki argon gas stable arrangement of electrons show karti iss wajah se chloride ion bhi chlorine atom se jyada stable hota hai.
Ab chlorine atom meh equal number of 17 protons aur 17 electrons present hote hai iss wajah se chlorine atom electrically neutral hota hai. Lekin chloride ion (Cl) meh 17 protons aur 18 electrons hote hai matlab ye 1 electron gain karne ke baad form hota hai. Ab kyunki chloride ion meh proton ki respect meh 1 electron jyada hai iss wajah se chloride ion (Cl) par 1 unit negative charge present hota hai.
ocr_image
Figure : Diagram to show the formation of a chloride ion


Yahan fluoride ion ka formation bhi chloride ion ki tarah hota hai. Since fluorine ka atomic number 9 hota hai aur iski electronic configuration K2,L7 hoti hai which is unstable, lekin jab ye 1 electron gain karta hai tab ye fluoride (F) ion form kar stable neon noble gas configuration achieve karta hai K2,L8. Similarly, bromine aur iodine atom bhi 1 electron gain kar bromide (Br) aur iodide (I) ion form karte hai. Tab bromide (Br) aur iodide (I) ion krypton aur xenon noble gas configuration achieve karte hai.

Formation of Oxide Ion, (O2)
Ab agar hum oxygen non-metal consider kare toh iska atomic number 8 hota hai aur iski electronic configuration K2,L6 hoti hai, so iske outermost L shell meh 6 electrons present hai. Ab oxygen atom ko stable 8-electron inert gas configuration gain karne ke liye 2 more electrons required hote hai. So, stability gain karne ke liye oxygen atom kisi dusre atom se 2 electrons accept karta hai aur tab ye oxide ion (O2) form karta hai having 2 units negative charge.
ocr_image


Since oxide ion (O2) ki electronic configuration noble gas - neon jaisi hai aur kyunki neon gas stable arrangement of electrons show karti iss wajah se oxide ion bhi oxygen atom se jyada stable hota hai.
Oxygen atom meh equal number of protons aur electrons hote hai iss wajah se oxygen atom electrically neutral hota hai. Lekin oxide ion (O2) meh 8 protons aur 10 electrons hote hai matlab ye 2 electrons gain karne ke baad form hota hai. Ab kyunki oxide (O2) ion meh protons ke comparison 2 electrons jyada hai iss wajah se oxide ion (O2) par 2 units negative charge present hote hai.
Moreover, sulphide ion ka formation bhi oxide ion ki tarah hota hai kyunki sulphur atom ke outermost shell meh bhi 6 electrons present hote hai. Sulphur ka atomic number 16 hota hai aur iski electronic configuration K2,L8,M6 hoti hai. So jab ye 2 electrons gain karta hai tab ye stable argon inert gas electron arrangement ko achieve kar sulphide ion (S2) form karta hai aur tab iski configuration K2,L8,M8 hoti hai.

Formation of Nitride Ion, (N3)
Nitrogen ka atomic number 7 hota hai aur accordingly iski electronic configuration K2,L5 hoti hai, so iske outermost L shell meh 5 electrons present hai. Ab nitrogen atom ko stable 8-electron inert gas configuration gain karne ke liye 3 more electrons required hote hai. So, stability gain karne ke liye nitrogen atom kisi dusre atom se 3 electrons accept karta hai aur tab ye nitride ion (N3) form karta hai having 3 units negative charge.
ocr_image


Since nitride ion (N3) ki electronic configuration noble gas - neon jaisi hai aur kyunki neon gas stable arrangement of electrons show karti iss wajah se nitride ion bhi nitrogen atom se jyada stable hota hai.
Nitrogen atom meh equal number of protons aur electrons hote hai accordingly nitrogen atom electrically neutral hota hai. Lekin nitride ion (N3) meh 7 protons aur 10 electrons hote hai matlab ye 3 electrons gain karne ke baad form hota hai. Ab kyunki nitride (N3) ion meh protons ke comparison 3 electrons jyada hai iss wajah se nitride ion (N3) par 3 units negative charge present hote hai.

Electron Dot Representation
Chlorine atom ke outermost shell meh 7 electrons present hote hai, so iske electron dot structure ke liye hum iske symbol ke sath 7 dots lagate hai ocr_image. Jab chlorine atom ek electron gain karta hai tab ye chloride ion form karta hai aur ab iss chloride ion ke outermost shell meh 8 electrons hote hai. Iska agar hum structure consider kare ocr_image. Moreover. agar hum baki anions consider kare.
ocr_image
Figure : Some common non-metal elements that form negative ions (or Anions)

Formation of Negative Ions (or Anions)

If an element has 5, 6 or 7 electrons in the outermost shell of its atoms, then it gains 3, 2, or 1 electrons respectively to achieve the inert gas electron arrangement of eight valence electrons and form negatively charged ions or anions. Now, the non-metal atoms usually have 5, 6 or 7 electrons in the outermost shell, so the non-metal atoms gains 3, 2, or 1 electrons to form negatively charged ions or anions. For example, fluorine, chlorine, bromine, oxygen, nitrogen, phosphorus etc., are all non-metals which accept electrons to form negative ions. Moreover, the number of electrons gained by these non-metals can give rise to the same units charge on anion. Also, the non-metal carbon has 4 electrons in its outermost shell but it can neither lose 4 electrons nor gain 4 electrons due to energy considerations.

Formation of Chloride Ion, (Cl)
Chlorine non-metal has atomic number 17, which means 1 atom of chlorine has 17 electrons. The electronic configuration of chlorine will be K2,L8,M7, which indicates that chlorine atom has 7 electrons in its outermost M shell. It needs 1 more electron to achieve the stable 8-electron inert gas configuration. So, in order to become more stable, chlorine atom accepts 1 electron from some other atom (like that of sodium) and achieve argon gas configuration K2,L8,M8. By gaining 1 electron, the chlorine atom gets 1 unit of negative charge and becomes a chloride ion, (Cl).

ocr_image


The electronic configuration of a chloride ion (Cl) is the same as that of the nearest inert gas - argon and argon has the most stable electron configuration, due to this chloride ion (Cl) is more stable than chlorine atom.
A chlorine atom (Cl) contains 17 protons and 17 electrons, therefore it is electrically neutral. In the chloride ion (Cl), there are 17 protons and 18 electrons (because 1 electron has been added). This means that in a chloride ion (Cl) there is 1 electron more than protons. Due to 1 more electron than protons, a chloride ion has 1 unit negative charge (Cl).
ocr_image
Figure : Diagram to show the formation of a chloride ion


The formation of fluoride ion is similar to the formation of a chloride ion because like chlorine atom, the fluorine atom also have 7 electrons in its outermost shell. Since fluorine has atomic number 9 and its electronic configuration will be K2,L7 which is unstable, but when it gains 1 electron it forms fluoride (F) ion. Then it achieves a stable neon noble gas configuration K2,L8. Similarly, bromine and iodine atoms gain 1 electron and form bromide ion (Br) and iodide ion (I). Now these ions have krypton and xenon noble gas configuration respectively.

Formation of Oxide Ion, (O2)
The atomic number of oxygen is 8, so its electronic configuration is K2,L6. It has 6 electrons in its valence shell, so it needs 2 more electrons to achieve the stable 8-electron inert gas structure. By taking 2 electrons from some other atom, it forms an oxide ion (O2) having 2 units of negative charge.
ocr_image


The oxide ion (O2) has the neon inert gas electron structure of 8 electrons in the outermost shell, so it is more stable than a oxygen atom. The number of protons and electrons in an oxygen atom is equal (8 each), so an oxygen atom is electrically neutral. A oxide ion (O2) contains 8 protons and 10 electrons so it has 2 electrons more than protons due to this it has 2 units of negative charge.
Moreover, sulphide ion formation is similar to oxide ion because sulphur also have 6 electrons in its outermost shell. Sulphur has atomic number 16 and its electronic configuration will be K2,L8,M6 which is unstable, but when it gains 2 electrons it forms sulphide (S2) ion. Then it achieves a stable argon noble gas configuration K2,L8,M8.

Formation of Nitride Ion, (N3)
The atomic number of nitrogen is 7, so its electronic configuration is K2,L5. It has 5 electrons in its valence shell, so it needs 3 more electrons to achieve the stable 8-electron inert gas structure. By taking 3 electrons from some other atom, it forms a nitride ion (N3) having 3 units of negative charge.
ocr_image


The nitride ion (N3) has the neon inert gas electron structure of 8 electrons in the outermost shell, so it is more stable than a nitrogen atom. The number of protons and electrons in a nitrogen atom is equal (7 each), so a nitrogen atom is electrically neutral. A nitride ion (N3) contains 7 protons and 10 electrons so it has 3 electrons more than protons due to this it has 3 units of negative charge.

Electron Dot Representation
In the outermost shell of a chlorine atom 7 electrons are present, so for its electron dot structure we have to put 7 dots with its chemical symbol ocr_image. When a chlorine atom accepts one more electron to form a chloride ion, then this chloride ion has 8 electrons in its outermost shell. So we put 8 dots and write ocr_image for a chloride ion. Moreover when we consider electron dot structure of other anions.
ocr_image
Figure : Some common non-metal elements that form negative ions (or Anions)

Types of Chemical Bonds

Generally 2 types ke chemical bonds hote hai :
(i) Ionic Bond and
(ii) Covalent bond
Jisme ionic bonds ek atom se durse atom meh transfer of electrons se form hota hai aur covalent bond do atoms ke beech sharing of electrons se form hota hai. Jab atoms meh chemical bond form hota hai tab combining atoms stable noble gas configuration ko achieve kar lete hai.

Types of Chemical Bonds

There are 2 types of chemical bonds :
(i) Ionic Bond and
(ii) Covalent bond
Ionic bond is formed by complete transfer of electrons between the atoms and covalent bonds is formed by sharing of electrons between the combining atoms. When a chemical bond is formed between the atoms, then both the combining atoms acquire the stable inert gas electron configuration.

(i) Ionic Bond

Jab chemical bond 2 atoms ke beech transfer of electrons se form hota hai tab uss bond ko hum ionic bond bolte hai. Ab transfer of electrons iss tarah hota hai so that yahan jo ions formed hote hai wo stable noble gas electron arrangement achieve karle. Ab ionic bonds meh 2 oppositely charged ions present hote hai jo ek dusre ko strongly attract karte hai. So ionic bond ko hum following way meh define kar sakte hai :
Ionic bond tab form hota hai jab ek atom electrons donate kar aur ek atom electrons accept kar stable inert gas electron arrangement achieve karte hai.

Generally metal atom electrons donate kar positive ions form karte hai aur non-metal atom electrons accept kar negative ions form karte hai, iss wajah se ionic bond metal atoms se non-metal atoms ke beech transfer of electrons se form hote hai. In other words, the strong force of attraction developed between the oppositely charged ions is known as an ionic bond. For example sodium metal atom ek electron chlorine non-metal atom ko donate kar sodium chloride ionic compound form karta hai.

Formation of Sodium Chloride (NaCl)
Jab sodium metal chlorine non-metal ke sath react karta hai tab ye sodium chloride ionic compound form karta hai. Ab sodium aur chlorine atom ka atomic number 11 aur 17 hota hai, jiske according inki electronic configuration 2, 8, 1 aur 2, 8, 7 hoti hai. Iske basis par hum kah sakte hai ki jab sodium metal 1 electron donate (chlorine atom ko) aur chlorine non-metal 1 electron accept (sodium atom se) karte hai tab ye dono atoms noble gas configuration achieve kar sodium ion (Na+) aur chloride ion (Cl) form karte hai. Ab sodium aur chloride ions, oppositely charged hote hai jis wajah se inke beech electrostatic forces of attraction hoti hai aur kyunki ye compound transfer of electrons from sodium to chlorine atom se form hota hai iss wajah sodium chloride (Na+ClorNaCl) ionic compound hota hai.

ocr_image



Moreover, sodium chloride compound meh sodium ion ki configuration noble gas neon (2, 8) jaisi hai aur chloride ion ki configuration noble gas argon (2, 8, 8) jaisi hai, iss wajah se ye compound stable bhi hota hai.
ocr_image
Figure : a) Crystals of sodium chloride ionic compound. b) Sodium and chloride ion arrangement in a sodium chloride crystal.


Formation of Potassium Chloride (KCl)
Iss compound ka formation bhi sodium chloride ke jaise hi hota hai kyunki yahan potassium atom ke paas bhi 1 valence electron hota hai aur chlorine atom ke paas 7 valence electrons hote hai. So, jab potassium atom apna 1 valence electron chlorine atom ko donate karta hai tab ye potassium chloride ionic compound form karta hai.
ocr_image


Moreover, alkali metals ke sath fluorides, bromides, iodides ka formation bhi chlorides ki tarah hi hota hai kyunki sabhi alkali metals ke paas 1 valence electron aur other halogens jaise fluroine, bromine, iodine ke paas 7 valence electrons hote hai.

Formation of Magnesium Chloride (MgCl2)
Jab magnesium metal chlorine non-metal ke sath react karta hai tab ye magnesium chloride ionic compound form karta hai. Now magnesium aur chlorine atom ka atomic number 12 aur 17 hota hai, jiske according inki electronic configuration 2, 8, 2 aur 2, 8, 7 hoti hai. Iske basis par hum kah sakte hai ki jab magnesium metal 2 electrons donate (two chlorine atoms ko) aur chlorine non-metal 1 electron accept (two chlorine atoms 1 magnesium atom se) karte hai tab ye dono atoms noble gas configuration achieve kar magnesium ion (Mg+2) aur chloride ion (Cl) form karte hai. Ab kyunki magnesium ion par 2 units positive charge aur chloride ion par 1 unit negative charge present hai iss wajah se yahan magnesium metal ka 1 atom chlorine ke 2 atoms ko apne valence electrons donate kar magnesium chloride (MgCl2) compound form karta hai. Moreover, magnesium aur chloride ions, oppositely charge hai jis wajah se inke beech electrostatic forces of attraction hoti hai aur kyunki ye compound transfer of electrons from magnesium to two chlorine atoms se form hota hai iss wajah se magnesium chloride (MgCl2) ionic compound hota hai.
ocr_image


Also, magnesium chloride compound meh magnesium ion ki configuration noble gas neon (2, 8) jaisi hai aur chloride ion ki configuration noble gas argon (2, 8, 8) jaisi hai iss wajah se ye compound bhi stable hota hai.
ocr_image
Figure : Magnesium chloride is an ionic compound having ionic bonds.


Formation of Calcium Chloride (CaCl2)
Iss compound ka formation bhi magnesium chloride ke jaise hi hota hai kyunki calcium atom ke paas bhi 2 valence electrons hote hai aur chlorine atom ke paas 7 valence electrons hote hai. So, jab calcium atom apne 2 valence electrons 2 chlorine atoms ko donate karta hai tab ye calcium chloride (CaCl2) ionic compound form karta hai.
ocr_image


Formation of Magnesium Oxide (MgO)
Jab magnesium metal ko hum oxygen non-metal ke sath burn karte hai tab ye magnesium oxide ionic compound form karta hai. Now magnesium aur oxygen atom ka atomic number 12 aur 8 hota hai, jiske according inki electronic configuration 2, 8, 2 aur 2, 6 hoti hai. Iske basis par hum kah sakte hai ki jab magnesium metal 2 electrons donate (oxygen atom ko) aur oxygen non-metal 2 electrons accept (magnesium atom se) karte hai tab ye dono atoms noble gas configuration ko achieve kar magnesium ion (Mg+2) aur oxide ion (O2) form karte hai. Ab kyunki magnesium ion par 2 units positive charge aur oxide ion par bhi 2 units negative charge hai iss wajah se yahan magnesium metal ka 1 atom oxygen ke 1 atom ko apne valence electrons donate kar magnesium oxide (MgO) compound form karta hai. Moreover, magnesium aur oxide ions, oppositely charged hote hai jis wajah se inke beech electrostatic forces of attraction hoti hai aur kyunki ye compound transfer of electrons from magnesium to oxygen atom se form hota hai iss wajah se magnesium oxide (MgO) ionic compound hota hai.
ocr_image


Also, magnesium oxide compound meh magnesium ion ki configuration noble gas neon (2, 8) jaisi hai aur oxide ion ki configuration bhi noble gas neon (2, 8) jaisi hai iss wajah se ye compound bhi stable hota hai.

Formation of Calcium Oxide (CaO)
Iss compound ka formation bhi magnesium oxide ke jaise hi hota hai kyunki calcium atom ke paas bhi 2 valence electrons hote hai aur oxygen atom ke paas 6 valence electrons hote hai. So, jab calcium atom apne 2 valence electrons 1 oxygen atom ko donate karta hai tab ye calcium oxide (CaO) ionic compound form karta hai.
ocr_image


Ionic Compounds
Jis compounds meh ionic bonds present hote hai wo ionic compounds hote hai. Ye compounds transfer of electrons se form hote hai aur inme positively (cations) and negatively (anions) charged ions present hote hai. Ionic compounds ko hum electrovalent compounds bhi bolte hai.
ocr_image
Figure : Some Ionic Compounds


Iss table ke according hum yahan conclude kar sakte hai - ionic compounds metal aur non-metal elements se form hote hai (Except ammonium chloride jo sirf non-metals elements se form hota hai).

(i) Ionic Bond

When a chemical bond is formed by the complete transfer of electrons between 2 atoms then it is known as ionic bond. The transfer of electrons takes place in such a way that the ions formed have the stable electron arrangement of an inert gas. Ionic bonds have 2 oppositely charged ions which strongly attract one another. Accordingly we can define ionic bond as follows :
Ionic bond is formed when one of the atoms donate electrons and the other atom accept that electrons, during this electron transfer both of the atoms achieve stable noble gas electron arrangement.

Generally metal atom donate electrons and form positive ions and non-metal atom accept electrons and form negative ions that’s why ionic bond is formed by the transfer of electrons between metal and non-metal atom. In other words, the strong force of attraction developed between the oppositely charged ions is known as an ionic bond. For example a sodium metal atom donates one electron to chlorine non-metal atom and forms sodium chloride ionic compound.

Formation of Sodium Chloride (NaCl)
When sodium metal reacts with chlorine non-metal then it form sodium chloride ionic compound. The atomic number of sodium and chlorine atom is 11 and 17 respectively accordingly their respective electronic configuration is 2, 8, 1 and 2, 8, 7. From this we can say that when sodium metal donates its 1 electron (to chlorine atom) and chlorine non-metal accepts 1 electron (from sodium atom), then both of the atoms achieve noble gas configuration and form sodium ion (Na+) and chloride ion (Cl). Now sodium and chloride ions are oppositely charged ions, due to which these ions are held together by strong electrostatic forces of attraction. Since, this compound is formed by the transfer of electrons from sodium to chlorine atom that’s why sodium chloride (Na+ClorNaCl) is an ionic compound.

ocr_image


Moreover, sodium chloride compound consist of sodium ions whose configuration is similar to the noble gas neon (2, 8) and chloride ions configuration is similar to the noble gas argon (2, 8, 8). Due to this, sodium chloride compound is very stable.
ocr_image
Figure : a) Crystals of sodium chloride ionic compound. b) Sodium and chloride ion arrangement in a sodium chloride crystal.


Formation of Potassium Chloride (KCl)
The formation of potassium chloride is similar to the formation sodium chloride, because potassium atom also has 1 valence electron and chlorine atom have 7 valence electrons. So, when potassium atom donates its 1 valence electron to chlorine atom then it forms potassium chloride ionic compound.
ocr_image


Moreover, the formation of fluorides, bromides and iodides of alkali metals is similar to the formation of chlorides. This is because all alkali metals have 1 valence electron and other halogens like fluorine, bromine, iodine have 7 electrons in their outermost valence shell.

Formation of Magnesium Chloride (MgCl2)
When magnesium metal reacts with chlorine non-metal then it forms magnesium chloride ionic compound. The atomic number of magnesium and chlorine atom is 12 and 17 respectively accordingly their respective electronic configuration is 2, 8, 2 and 2, 8, 7. From this we can say that when magnesium metal donate its 2 electrons (to two chlorine atoms) and chlorine non-metal accepts 1 electron (two chlorine atoms from one magnesium atom), then both of the atoms achieve noble gas configuration and form magnesium ion (Mg+2) and chloride ion (Cl). Since magnesium ion have 2 units positive charge and chloride ion has 1 unit negative charge, due to this 1 atom of magnesium donates its valence electrons to 2 chlorine atoms and form magnesium chloride (MgCl2) compound. Now magnesium and chloride ions are oppositely charged ions, due to which these ions are held together by strong electrostatic forces of attraction. Since, this compound is formed by the transfer of electrons from magnesium to two chlorine atoms that’s why magnesium chloride (MgCl2) is an ionic compound.
ocr_image


Also, magnesium chloride compound consist of magnesium ions whose configuration is similar to the noble gas neon (2, 8) and chloride ions whose configuration is similar to the noble gas argon (2, 8, 8). Due to this, magnesium chloride compound is very stable.
ocr_image
Figure : Magnesium chloride is an ionic compound having ionic bonds.


Formation of Calcium Chloride (CaCl2)
The formation of calcium chloride is similar to the formation magnesium chloride, because calcium atom also have 2 valence electrons and chlorine atom have 7 valence electrons. So, when calcium atom donate its 2 valence electrons to two chlorine atoms then it forms calcium chloride (CaCl2) ionic compound.
ocr_image


Formation of Magnesium Oxide (MgO)
When magnesium metal burns with oxygen non-metal then it form magnesium oxide ionic compound. The atomic number of magnesium and oxygen atom is 12 and 8 respectively accordingly their respective electronic configuration is 2, 8, 2 and 2, 6. From this we can say that when magnesium metal donate its 2 electrons (to oxygen atom) and oxygen non-metal accept 2 electrons (from magnesium atom), then both of the atoms achieve noble gas configuration and form magnesium ion (Mg+2) and oxide ion (O2). Since magnesium ion have 2 units positive charge and oxide ion has 2 units negative charge, due to this 1 atom of magnesium donates its valence electrons to 1 oxygen atom and form magnesium oxide (MgO) compound. Now magnesium and oxide ions are oppositely charged ions, due to which these ions are held together by strong electrostatic forces of attraction. Since, this compound is formed by the transfer of electrons from magnesium to oxygen atom that’s why magnesium oxide (MgO) is an ionic compound.
ocr_image


Also, magnesium oxide compound consist of magnesium ions whose configuration is similar to the noble gas neon (2, 8) and oxide ions whose configuration is also similar to the noble gas neon (2, 8). Due to this magnesium oxide compound is stable.

Formation of Calcium Oxide (CaO)
The formation of calcium oxide is similar to the formation magnesium oxide, because calcium atom also have 2 valence electrons and oxygen atom have 6 valence electrons. So, when calcium atom donate its 2 valence electrons to 1 oxygen atoms then it forms calcium oxide (CaO) ionic compound.
ocr_image


Ionic Compounds
The compounds containing ionic bonds are known as ionic compounds. They are formed by the transfer of electrons and they consist of positively (cations) and negatively (anions) charged ions. They are also known as electrovalent compounds.
ocr_image
Figure : Some Ionic Compounds


According to this table, we can conclude that ionic compounds are made up of metal and non-metal elements (Except ammonium chloride which is made up of non-metals elements).

(ii) Covalent Bond

Jab chemical bond 2 atoms ke beech sharing of electrons se form hota hai tab uss bond ko hum covalent bond bolte hai. Ab atoms ke beech sharing of electrons iss tarah hoti hai so that resulting molecule ke sabhi atoms stable inert gas electron arrangement ko achieve karle. Covalent bond formation ke liye atoms apne outermost electrons ko hi share karte hai. Covalent bond generally tab form hota hai jab dono reacting atoms ko inert gas electron arrangement achieve karne ke liye electrons required hote hai. Since, non-metals ko inert gas electron arrangement achieve karne ke liye electrons required hote hai isliye jab ek non-metal dusre non-metal ke sath combine kar sharing of electrons karta hai tab ye covalent bond form karta hai. For example hydrogen aur chlorine non-metals hai, so jab hydrogen aur chlorine atom ek dusre ke sath combine kar sharing of electrons karte hai tab ye covalent bond form kar hydrogen chloride (HCl) compound form karte hai. Iske alawa covalent bond same non-metal atoms ke beech bhi form ho sakta hai. For example jab chlorine non-metal ke 2 atoms aapas meh combine kar sharing of electrons karte hai tab ye bhi covalent bond form kar chlorine molecule (Cl2) form karte hai. Covalent bond 3 types ke hote hai :
(a) Single Covalent Bond
(b) Double Covalent Bond
(c) Triple Covalent Bond

(ii) Covalent Bond

When a chemical bond is formed by the sharing of electrons between 2 atoms then it is known as covalent bond. The sharing of electrons takes place in such a way that each atom in the resulting molecule gets the stable electron arrangement of an inert gas. It should be noted that atoms share only their outermost electron in the formation of covalent bonds. A covalent bond is formed when both the reacting atoms need electrons to achieve the inert gas electron arrangement. Now non-metals require electrons to achieve the inert gas electron arrangement, that’s why when one non-metal combines with another non-metal, sharing of electrons takes place between their atoms then a covalent bond is formed. For example hydrogen and chlorine are non-metals, so when hydrogen combines with chlorine it forms hydrogen chloride by sharing electrons between these atoms and a covalent bond is formed. It should be noted that a covalent bond can also be formed between two atoms of the same non-metal. For example two chlorine atoms combine together by the sharing of electrons to form a chlorine molecule (Cl2), and a covalent bond is formed between the two chlorine atoms. Covalent bonds are of three types :
(a) Single Covalent Bond
(b) Double Covalent Bond
(c) Triple Covalent Bond

Single Bond

Single covalent bond meh 1 pair of shared electrons matlab 2 electrons hote hai. In other words, single bond formation meh do atoms ke beech 2 electrons shared hote hai, jahan each atom 1 electron ka contribution karte hai. Single covalent bond ko hum () se represent karte hai. For example hydrogen molecule (H2) meh dono hydrogen atoms 1 electron ka contribution karte hai, iss wajah se inn dono atoms ke beech single covalent bond form hota hai jisko hum H:HorHH se represent karte hai.

Formation of a Chlorine Molecule, (Cl2)
Chlorine atom very reactive hota hai aur ye free state meh exist nahi karta, kyunki free state meh iske paas stable inert gas electron arrangement nahi hoti. Ab chlorine ka atomic number 17 hota hai aur iski electronic configuration 2, 8, 7 hoti hai, so iske outermost valence shell meh 7 electrons hote hai. Accordingly, chlorine atom ko stable argon inert gas electron arrangement achieve karne ke liye 1 more electron required hota hai. Jo isse dusre chlorine atom ke sath sharing of electron se mil jata hai. So, two chlorine atoms 1 electron each share kar chlorine molecule form karte hai.

ocr_image


Ab strong attractive force jo inn dono chlorine atoms ko hold karti hai uss force ko hum covalent bond bolte hai. Bonded chlorine atoms yahan chlorine molecule form karte hai aur yahan two chlorine atoms one pair of electrons share kar rahe hai isliye inn dono atoms ke beech, bond ko hum single covalent bond or single bond bolte hai. Ab kyunki chlorine molecule meh each chlorine atom stable inert gas electron arrangement achieve kar lete hai iss wajah se chlorine molecule as compared to chlorine atom more stable hota hai.
ocr_image
Figure : Diagram to show the formation of a chlorine molecule


Formation of a Hydrogen Molecule, (H2)
Hydrogen atom very reactive hota hai aur ye free state meh exist nahi karta, kyunki free state meh iske paas bhi stable inert gas electron arrangement nahi hoti. Ab hydrogen ka atomic number 1 hota hai aur iski electronic configuration K1 hoti hai, so iske paas sirf 1 electron hi present hai. Accordingly, hydrogen ko stable helium inert gas electron arrangement ke liye 1 more electron required hota hai, kyunki K shell meh maximum 2 electrons hi present ho sakte hai. Jo isse dusre hydrogen atom ke sath sharing of electron se mil jata hai. So, two hydrogen atoms 1 electron each share kar hydrogen molecule form karte hai.
ocr_image


Ab strong attractive force jo inn dono hydrogen atoms ko hold karti hai uss force ko hum covalent bond bolte hai. Bonded hydrogen atoms yahan hydrogen molecule form karte hai aur yahan two hydrogen atoms one pair of electrons share kar rahe hai isliye inn dono atoms ke beech, bond ko hum single covalent bond or single bond bolte hai. Ab kyunki hydrogen molecule meh each hydrogen atom stable inert gas electron arrangement achieve kar lete hai iss wajah se hydrogen molecule as compared to hydrogen atom more stable hota hai.
ocr_image
Figure : Diagram to show the formation of a hydrogen molecule


Formation of a Hydrogen Chloride Molecule, (HCl)
Jaise ki humne oopar dekha hydrogen ke outermost shell meh 1 electron present hota hai aur isko 1 more electron required hota hai so that ye stable helium inert gas configuration achieve karle. Similarly, chlorine atom ke outermost shell meh 7 electrons present hote hai, matlab isko bhi 1 more electron required hota hai so that ye stable argon inert gas configuration achieve karle. Since, dono atoms ko stability gain karne ke liye 1 electron each required hota hai, iss wajah se ye dono atoms ek dusre ke sath 1 electron each share kar stability gain karte hai. So, jab yahan hydrogen aur chlorine atom ek electron each share karte hai tab ye hydrogen chloride molecule form karte hai by single covalent bond.
ocr_image


Formation of a Methane Molecule, (CH4)
Methane molecule ek covalent compound hai, jisme carbon aur hydrogen elements ke beech covalent bonds present hote hai. As we know, carbon ka atomic number 6 hota hai aur iski electronic configuration 2, 4 hoti hai, jiska matlab carbon ke outermost shell meh 4 valence electrons hote hai aur isko 4 more electrons required hote hai so that ye stable neon inert gas configuration achieve karle. Ab hydrogen ka atomic number 1 hota hai matlab iske outermost shell meh 1 electron present hai aur isko 1 more electron required hota hai so that ye stable helium inert gas configuration achieve karle. Thus, carbon apna octet of electrons complete karne ke liye yahan apne 4 valence electrons ko 4 hydrogen atoms (duplet) ke sath share karta hai aur tab yahan methane molecule form hota hai by single covalent bonds.
ocr_image


Therefore, methane molecule meh 1 carbon atom 4 hydrogen atoms ke sath 1 pair of electrons each share kar 4 carbon-hydrogen bonds form karta hai aur tab yahan dono atoms stable inert gas configuration achieve kar lete hai. So, ek methane molecule meh four pairs of shared electrons hote hai.

Formation of a Water Molecule, (H2O)
Water molecule ek covalent compound hai, jisme oxygen aur hydrogen elements ke beech covalent bonds present hote hai. As we know, oxygen ka atomic number 8 hota hai aur iski electronic configuration 2, 6 hoti hai, jiska matlab oxygen ke outermost shell meh 6 valence electrons hote hai aur isko 2 more electrons required hote hai so that ye stable neon inert gas configuration achieve karle. Ab hydrogen ka atomic number 1 hota hai matlab iske outermost shell meh 1 electron present hai aur isko 1 more electron required hota hai so that ye stable helium inert gas configuration achieve karle. Thus, oxygen apna octet of electrons complete karne ke liye yahan apne 2 valence electrons ko 2 hydrogen atoms (duplet) ke sath share karta hai aur tab yahan water molecule form hota hai by single covalent bonds.
ocr_image


Therefore, water molecule meh 1 oxygen atom 2 hydrogen atoms ke sath 1 pair of electrons each share kar 2 oxygen-hydrogen bonds form karta hai aur tab yahan dono atoms stable inert gas configuration achieve kar lete hai. Iske alawa yahan 2 electron pairs oxygen par unshared bhi present hote hai.

Single Bond

A single covalent bond consists of one pair of shared electrons which means 2 electrons. In other words, a single covalent bond is formed by the sharing of 2 electrons between two atoms, where each atom contributing one electron for sharing. A single covalent bond is denoted by putting a short line () between the two atoms. For example, a hydrogen molecule (H2), contains a single covalent bond and it is written as H:H or can be written as HH.

Formation of a Chlorine Molecule, (Cl2)
A chlorine atom is very reactive and cannot exist free because it does not have the stable electron arrangement of an inert gas. The atomic number of chlorine is 17, so its electronic configuration is 2, 8, 7. Chlorine atom has 7 electrons in its outermost shell and needs 1 more electron to complete its octet and become stable. It gets this electron by sharing with another chlorine atom. So, two chlorine atoms share one electron each to form a chlorine molecule.

ocr_image


Because, the two chlorine atoms share electrons, there is a strong force of attraction between them which holds them together. This force is called a covalent bond. The bonded chlorine atoms thus form a chlorine molecule. Since the two chlorine atoms share one pair of electrons, the bond between them is called a single covalent bond or just a single bond. By doing this both chlorine atoms achieve argon inert gas configuration, due to this chlorine molecule is more stable than chlorine atoms.
ocr_image
Figure : Diagram to show the formation of a chlorine molecule


Formation of a Hydrogen Molecule, (H2)
A hydrogen atom is very reactive and cannot exist free because it does not have the stable electron arrangement of an inert gas. The atomic number of hydrogen is 1, so its electronic configuration is K1. A hydrogen atom has 1 electron in its outermost shell and needs 1 more electron to complete its duplet, because in the K shell a maximum of 2 electrons are present which provide stability. It gets this electron by sharing with another hydrogen atom. So, two hydrogen atoms share one electron each to form a hydrogen molecule.
ocr_image


Because, the two hydrogen atoms share electrons, there is a strong force of attraction between them which holds them together. This force is called a covalent bond. The bonded hydrogen atoms thus form a hydrogen molecule. Since the two hydrogen atoms share one pair of electrons, the bond between them is called a single covalent bond or just a single bond. By doing this both hydrogen atoms achieve helium inert gas configuration, due to this hydrogen molecule is more stable than hydrogen atoms.
ocr_image
Figure : Diagram to show the formation of a hydrogen molecule


Formation of a Hydrogen Chloride Molecule, (HCl)
As we know, a hydrogen atom has 1 valence electron, so it needs 1 more electron to get 2-electron helium gas electron structure and become stable. Chlorine atom have 7 valence electrons, so it also needs 1 more electron to achieve the 8-electron structure and become stable. Since both hydrogen atom and chlorine atom need 1 electron each, they will become stable by sharing 1 electron with each other. So, the hydrogen atom and chlorine atom share one electron each and form a hydrogen chloride molecule by single covalent bond. In doing so, hydrogen achieves helium inert gas configuration and chlorine achieves argon inert gas configuration.
ocr_image


Formation of a Methane Molecule, (CH4)
Methane is a covalent compound which have covalent bonds in between carbon and hydrogen elements. The atomic number of carbon is 6, so its electronic configuration is 2, 4 which means it needs 4 more electrons to complete the 8-electron structure and become stable. Similarly, hydrogen atomic number is 1 which means it has 1 electron in its outermost shell and it also requires 1 more electron in order to achieve helium inert gas configuration. So, the carbon atom shares its 4 valence electrons with four hydrogen atoms and forms a methane molecule by single covalent bonds.
ocr_image


In the methane molecule, both carbon atom as well as the hydrogen atoms have stable inert gas electron arrangements. There are four carbon-hydrogen single bonds in methane. Each single bond consists of one pair of shared electrons. So, a methane molecule have four pairs of shared electrons.

Formation of a Water Molecule, (H2O)
Water is a covalent compound which have covalent bonds in between oxygen and hydrogen elements. The atomic number of oxygen is 8, so its electronic configuration is 2, 6 which means it needs 2 more electrons to complete the 8-electron structure and become stable. Similarly hydrogen atomic number is 1 which means it has 1 electron in its outermost shell and it also requires 1 more electron in order to achieve helium inert gas configuration. So, the oxygen atom shares its 2 valence electrons with two hydrogen atoms and forms a water molecule by single covalent bonds.
ocr_image


In the water molecule, both oxygen atom as well as the hydrogen atoms have stable inert gas electron arrangements. There are two oxygen-hydrogen single bonds in water. Each single bond consists of one pair of shared electrons. Here, it is also noted that the central oxygen atom in the water molecule has two pairs of unshared electrons.

Double Bond

Double covalent bond meh 2 pairs of shared electrons matlab 4 electrons hote hai. In other words, double bond formation meh 2 atoms ke beech 4 electrons shared hote hai, jahan each atom 2 electrons ka contribution karte hai. Double covalent bond ko hum (=) se represent karte hai, kyunki ye 2 single bonds ka combination hota hai. Ab jis compounds meh double covalent bond present hote hai unke hum examples consider karte hai.

Formation of Oxygen Molecule, (O2)
Oxygen atom very reactive hota hai aur ye free state meh exist nahi karta, kyunki free state meh iske paas stable inert gas electron arrangement nahi hoti. Ab oxygen ka atomic number 8 hota hai aur iski electronic configuration 2, 6 hoti hai, so iske outermost valence shell meh 6 electrons hote hai. Accordingly, oxygen atom ko stable neon inert gas electron arrangement achieve karne ke liye 2 more electrons required hote hai. Jo isse dusre oxygen atom ke sath sharing of electrons se mil jate hai. So, two oxygen atoms 2 electrons each share kar stable oxygen molecule form karte hai.

ocr_image


Since, yahan oxygen atoms 2 pairs of electrons share kar rahe hai isliye inn dono atoms ke beech, bond ko hum double covalent bond or double bond bolte hai. Ab kyunki oxygen molecule meh each oxygen atom stable inert gas electron arrangement achieve kar lete hai iss wajah se oxygen molecule as compared to oxygen atom more stable hota hai. Yahan ye bhi note kiya gaya hai ki double bond as compared to single bond more stronger hota hai.

Formation of Carbon Dioxide Molecule, (CO2)
Carbon dioxide ek covalent compound hai, jisme carbon aur oxygen elements ke beech covalent bonds present hote hai. As we know, carbon ke paas 4 valence electrons aur oxygen ke paas 6 valence electrons hote hai, which means carbon ko apna octet of electrons complete karne ke liye 4 more electrons aur oxygen ko apna octet of electrons complete karne ke liye 2 more electrons required hote hai. So, carbon apna octet of electrons, complete karne ke liye yahan apne 4 valence electrons ko 2 oxygen atoms ke sath share karta hai aur tab yahan carbon dioxide molecule form hota hai by double covalent bonds. Carbon dioxide molecule meh 2 double bonds present hote hai, jisme carbon atom 2 oxygen atoms ke beech 2 double bonds se linked hota hai. As a result, tab iss molecule meh teeno atoms stable inert gas electron arrangement achieve kar lete hai.
ocr_image


Formation of Ethene Molecule, (C2H4)
Similarly, ethene bhi ek covalent compound hai, jisme carbon-carbon aur carbon-hydrogen elements ke beech covalent bonds present hote hai. As we know, carbon ko apna octet complete karne ke liye 4 more electrons aur hydrogen ko apna duplet complete karne ke liye 1 more electron required hota hai. So, ethene molecule formation meh two carbon atoms aapas meh 2 electrons each share kar ek double bond form karte hai aur two carbon atoms ke jo remaining four electrons hote hai wo ye 4 hydrogen atoms ke sath share kar 4 carbon-hydrogen single bonds form karte hai.
ocr_image


Thus, ethene molecule meh two carbon atoms ke beech 1 double bond aur carbon-hydrogen atoms ke beech 4 single bonds present hote hai. As a result, tab iss molecule meh both carbon atoms aur 4 hydrogen atoms apne octet aur duplet of electrons respectively complete kar lete hai.

Double Bond

A double covalent bond consists of two pairs of shared electrons which means 4 electrons. In other words, a double covalent bond is formed by the sharing of 4 electrons between two atoms, where each atom contributing two electron for sharing. A double covalent bond is denoted by putting (=) between the two atoms as this is a combination of 2 single bonds. Now we shall consider the compounds which contain double covalent bonds.

Formation of Oxygen Molecule, (O2)
An oxygen atom is very reactive and cannot exist free because it does not have the stable electron arrangement of an inert gas. The atomic number of oxygen is 8, so its electronic configuration is 2, 6. Oxygen atom has 6 electrons in its outermost shell and needs 2 more electrons to complete its octet and become stable. It gets these electrons by sharing with another oxygen atom. So, two oxygen atoms share two electrons each and form a stable oxygen molecule.

ocr_image


Since, the two oxygen atoms share two pairs of electrons, the bond between them is called a double covalent bond or just a double bond. By doing this both oxygen atoms achieve neon inert gas configuration, due to this oxygen molecule is more stable than oxygen atoms. It is noted that a double bond is more stronger than a single bond.

Formation of Carbon Dioxide Molecule, (CO2)
Carbon dioxide is a covalent compound which have covalent bonds in between carbon and oxygen elements. As we know, carbon has 4 valence electrons, so it need 4 more electrons to complete the 8-electron structure and become stable. Similarly, oxygen has 6 valence electrons, so it need 2 more electrons to complete the 8-electron structure and become stable. So, one carbon atom shares its 4 valence electrons with two oxygen atoms and forms a carbon dioxide molecule by double covalent bonds. In this molecule, carbon atom is in the middle of the molecule and two oxygen atoms are held to it by means of two double bonds, one on each side of the carbon atom. Along with this in carbon dioxide molecule both carbon and oxygen atoms have attained nearest noble gas configuration.
ocr_image


Formation of Ethene Molecule, (C2H4)
Similarly, ethene is also a covalent compound which have covalent bonds in between carbon-carbon and carbon-hydrogen elements. As we know, carbon has 4 valence electrons, so it need 4 more electrons to complete the 8-electron structure and become stable. Similarly, hydrogen has 1 valence electron, so it need 1 more electron to complete the 2-electron structure (duplet) and become stable. In the formation of ethene molecule, the two carbon atoms share two electrons each to form a double bond among themselves. The remaining four electrons of the two carbon atoms are shared with four hydrogen atoms to form four carbon-hydrogen single bonds.
ocr_image


Thus, in ethene molecule 1 carbon-carbon double bond and 4 carbon-hydrogen single bonds are present. Along with this, both carbon atoms and 4 hydrogen atoms have attained octet and duplet of electrons respectively.

Triple Bond

Triple covalent bond meh 3 pairs of shared electrons matlab 6 electrons hote hai. In other words, triple bond formation meh 2 atoms ke beech 6 electrons shared hote hai, jahan each atom 3 electrons ka contribution karte hai. Triple covalent bond ko hum () se represent karte hai, kyunki ye 3 single bonds ka combination hota hai. Ab jis compounds meh triple covalent bond present hota hai unke examples hum consider karte hai.

Formation of Nitrogen Molecule, (N2)
Nitrogen atom very reactive hota hai aur ye free state meh exist nahi karta, kyunki free state meh ye stable inert gas electron arrangement show nahi karta. Ab nitrogen ka atomic number 7 hota hai aur iski electronic configuration 2, 5 hoti hai, so iske outermost valence shell meh 5 electrons hote hai. Accordingly, nitrogen atom ko stable neon inert gas electron arrangement achieve karne ke liye 3 more electrons required hote hai. Jo isse dusre nitrogen atom ke sath sharing of electrons se mil jate hai. So, two nitrogen atoms 3 electrons each share kar molecule of nitrogen gas form karte hai.

ocr_image


Since, yahan nitrogen atoms 3 pairs of electrons share kar rahe hai isliye inn dono atoms ke beech, bond ko hum triple covalent bond or triple bond bolte hai. Ab kyunki nitrogen molecule meh each nitrogen atom stable inert gas electron arrangement achieve kar lete hai iss wajah se nitrogen molecule as compared to nitrogen atom more stable hota hai. Yahan ye bhi note kiya gaya hai ki triple bond as compared to single aur double bond more stronger hota hai.

Formation of Ethyne Molecule, (C2H2)
Similarly, ethyne bhi ek covalent compound hai, jisme carbon-carbon aur carbon-hydrogen atoms ke beech covalent bonds present hote hai. As we know, carbon ko apna octet complete karne ke liye 4 more electrons aur hydrogen ko apna duplet complete karne ke liye 1 more electron required hota hai. So, ethyne molecule formation meh two carbon atoms aapas meh 3 electrons each share kar ek triple bond form karte hai aur two carbon atoms ke jo remaining 2 electrons hote hai wo ye 2 hydrogen atoms ke sath share kar 2 carbon-hydrogen single bonds form karte hai.
ocr_image


Thus, ethyne molecule meh 1 triple bond aur 2 single bonds present hote hai. As a result, tab iss molecule meh both carbon atoms aur both hydrogen atoms apne octet aur duplet of electrons respectively complete kar lete hai.

Covalent Compounds
Jis compound meh covalent bonds present hote hai unko hum covalent compounds bolte hai. Ab covalent compounds, atoms ke beech sharing of electrons se form hote hai aur jo covalent compounds molecules se form hote hai unko hum molecular compounds bolte hai. Agar hum covalent compounds ke example consider kare :
ocr_image
Figure : Some Covalent Compounds


Iss table ke according sabhi covalent compounds non-metal elements se form hue hai, iska matlab jo compounds non-metal elements se form hote hai wo generally covalent compounds hote hai jisme covalent bonds present hote hai.

Triple Bond

A triple covalent bond consists of three pairs of shared electrons which means 6 electrons. In other words, a triple covalent bond is formed by the sharing of 6 electrons between two atoms, where each atom contributing three electrons for sharing. A triple covalent bond is denoted by putting () between the two atoms as this is a combination of 3 single bonds. Now we consider the compounds which contain triple covalent bonds.

Formation of Nitrogen Molecule, (N2)
A nitrogen atom is very reactive and cannot exist free because it does not have the stable electron arrangement of an inert gas. The atomic number of nitrogen is 7, so its electronic configuration is 2, 5. A nitrogen atom has 5 electrons in its outermost shell and needs 3 more electrons to complete its octet and become stable. It gets these electrons by sharing with another nitrogen atom. So, two nitrogen atoms share three electrons each to form a molecule of nitrogen gas.

ocr_image


Since, the two nitrogen atoms share three pairs of electrons, the bond between them is called a triple covalent bond or just a triple bond. By doing this both nitrogen atoms achieve neon inert gas configuration, due to this nitrogen molecule is more stable than nitrogen atoms. It is noted that a triple bond is more stronger than a single and double bond.

Formation of Ethyne Molecule, (C2H2)
Similarly, ethyne is also a covalent compound which have covalent bonds in between carbon-carbon and carbon-hydrogen elements. As we know, carbon has 4 valence electrons, so it need 4 more electrons to complete the 8-electron structure and become stable. Similarly, hydrogen has 1 valence electron, so it need 1 more electron to complete the 2-electron structure (duplet) and become stable. In the formation of ethyne molecule, the two carbon atoms share three electrons each to form a triple bond among themselves. The remaining two electrons of the two carbon atoms are shared with two hydrogen atoms to form two carbon-hydrogen single bonds.
ocr_image


Thus, in ethyne molecule 1 carbon-carbon triple bond and 2 carbon-hydrogen single bonds are present. Along with this, both carbon atoms and 2 hydrogen atoms have attained octet and duplet of electrons respectively.

Covalent Compounds
The compounds containing covalent bonds are known as covalent compounds. The covalent compounds are formed by the sharing of electrons between the atoms and those covalent compounds which are made up of molecules are also known as molecular compounds. Now we consider some covalent compounds examples :
ocr_image
Figure : Some Covalent Compounds


According to this table, all covalent compounds are made up of non-metal elements, which means the compounds which are made up of non-metal elements are generally known to be covalent compounds which contain covalent bonds.

Properties of Ionic Compounds

Ab hum ionic compounds ki important properties discuss karte hai :
1) Ionic compounds generally crystalline solids hote hai. For example sodium chloride crystalline solid hota hai. Ab ionic compounds solids isliye hote hai, kyunki inke oppositely charged ions yahan ek dusre ko strongly attract karte hain iss wajah se ye regular crystal structure form karte hai. Iske alawa ionic compounds hard aur brittle bhi hote hai.
2) Ionic compounds ka melting aur boiling point high hota hai. Ionic compounds positively aur negatively charged ions se form hote hai iss wajah se ionic compounds meh strong force of attraction present hoti hai. So, inn forces ko break karne ke liye hume jyada energy provide karni hoti hai jis wajah se ionic compounds ka melting aur boiling point high hota hai. For example sodium chloride ka high melting point 800C aur boiling point 1413C hota hai.
3) Ionic compounds generally water meh soluble aur organic solvents jaise ether, acetone, alcohol etc., meh insoluble hote hai. For example sodium chloride, copper sulphate ionic compounds hote hai iss wajah se ye water meh soluble or organic solvents meh insoluble hote hai. Since water ka high dielectric constant hota hai iss wajah se water, ions ke beech attraction ko weak karta hai jis wajah se ionic compounds water meh soluble hote hai.
4) Ionic compounds ko jab hum water meh dissolve karte hai ya fir inko melt karte hai tab ye electricity conduct karte hai, kyunki inn compounds meh charged particles called ions present hote hai. Jiska matlab ionic compounds electrolytes hote hai. Lekin solid ionic compounds electricity conduct nahi karte, kyunki solid state meh ions strong electrostatic forces ki wajah se ek position par fixed hote hai, matlab ye freely move nahi karte. Iss wajah se solid ionic compound electricity conduct nahi karte.
For example solid state meh sodium chloride electricity conduct nahi karta kyunki abhi sodium aur chloride ions ek position par fixed hai. Lekin agar hum sodium chloride ko water meh dissolve kare ya fir isse melt kare tab solid sodium chloride crystal break ho kar sodium ions, Na+ and chloride ions, Cl, form karta hai jo free hote hai aur tab ye electricity conduct karta hai.

Properties of Ionic Compounds

The important properties of ionic compounds are as follows :
1) Ionic compounds are usually crystalline solids. For example, sodium chloride is a crystalline solid. The ionic compounds are solids because their oppositely charged ions attract one another strongly and form a regular crystal structure. The crystals of ionic compounds are hard and brittle.
2) Ionic compounds have high melting points and high boiling points. The ionic compounds are made up of positive and negative ions. There is a strong force of attraction between the oppositely charged ions, so a lot of heat energy is required to break this force of attraction and melt or boil the ionic compound. Due to this, ionic compounds have high melting points and high boiling points. For example sodium chloride has a high melting point of 800C and it has a high boiling point of 1413C.
3) Ionic compounds are usually soluble in water but insoluble in organic solvents like ether, acetone, alcohol etc., For example, ionic compounds sodium chloride, copper sulphate are soluble in water but insoluble in organic solvents like ether, benzene or kerosene oil. The ionic compounds are soluble in water because water has a high dielectric constant due to which it weakens the attraction between the ions.
4) Ionic compounds conduct electricity when dissolved in water or melted because they contain charged particles in water called ions. This means that ionic compounds are electrolytes. Although solid ionic compounds do not conduct electric current in the solid state. This is due to the fact that in the solid ionic compound, the ions are held together in fixed positions by strong electrostatic forces and cannot move freely.
For example solid sodium chloride is made up of ions but it does not conduct electricity. This is due to the fact that the sodium ions and chloride ions are held together in fixed positions in the sodium chloride crystal and cannot move freely. But when sodium chloride is dissolved in water or melted, it becomes a good conductor of electricity. On dissolving in water or on melting, the sodium chloride crystal is broken up into sodium ions, Na+ and chloride ions, Cl which are free to move and conduct electricity.

Properties of Covalent Compounds

Ab hum covalent compounds ki important properties discuss karte hai :
1) Covalent compounds generally liquids or gases hote hai aur kuch solids state meh bhi exist karte hai. For example compounds jaise alcohol, ether, benzene, carbon disulphide, carbon tetrachloride aur bromine liquids hote hai. Similarly, compounds jaise methane, ethane, ethene, ethyne, chlorine gases hote hai. Also, compounds jaise glucose, cane sugar, naphthalene, iodine solid covalent compounds hote hai. Covalent compounds usually liquids aur gases hote hai kyunki inke molecules ke beech weak force of attraction hoti hai.
2) Covalent compounds ka melting aur boiling points usually low hota hai. For example naphthalene ka melting point 80C aur carbon tetrachloride ka melting point 77C hota hai. Covalent compounds generally electrically neutral molecules se form hote hai. So, covalent compounds meh forces of attraction very weak hoti hai, accordingly inn forces ko break karne ke liye hume less amount of energy required hoti hai. Iss wajah se hi covalent compounds ka melting aur boiling point low hota hai. Except covalent solids - diamond aur graphite jinke melting aur boiling points high hote hai.
3) Covalent compounds generally water meh insoluble aur organic solvents meh soluble hote hai. For example naphthalene water meh insoluble aur ether meh soluble hota hai. Lekin covalent compounds jaise glucose, sugar, urea etc., water meh soluble hote hai aur compounds jaise hydrogen chloride, ammonia bhi water meh soluble hote hai.
4) Covalent compounds electricity conduct nahi karte hai, kyunki inn compounds meh ions present nahi hote hai. Iss wajah se covalent compounds non-electrolytes hote hai. For example covalent compounds jaise glucose, cane sugar, urea, alcohol etc., electricity conduct nahi karte. Lekin compound jaise hydrogen chloride gas ko jab hum water meh dissolve karte hai tab ye ions release karne ki wajah se electricity conduct karte hai.

Properties of Covalent Compounds

The important properties of covalent compounds are as follows :
1) Covalent compounds are usually liquids or gases. Only some of them are solids. For example, compounds like alcohol, ether, benzene, carbon disulphide, carbon tetrachloride and bromine are liquids; methane, ethane, ethene, ethyne, and chlorine are gases; glucose, cane sugar, urea, naphthalene and iodine are however, solid covalent compounds. The covalent compounds are usually liquids or gases due to the weak force of attraction between their molecules.
2) Covalent compounds usually have low melting points and low boiling points. For example, naphthalene has a low melting point of 80C and carbon tetrachloride has a low melting point of 77C. Covalent compounds are made up of electrically neutral molecules. So, the force of attraction between the molecules of a covalent compound is very weak. Only a small amount of heat energy is required to break these weak molecular forces, due to which covalent compounds have low melting points and low boiling points. Except covalent solids like diamond and graphite which have, however, very high melting points and boiling points.
3) Covalent compounds are usually insoluble in water but they are soluble in organic solvents. For example, naphthalene is insoluble in water but dissolves in organic solvents like ether. Some of the covalent compounds like glucose, sugar and urea, etc., are, however, soluble in water. The covalent compounds like hydrogen chloride and ammonia are also soluble in water.
4) Covalent compounds do not conduct electricity, because they do not contain ions. This means that covalent compounds are non-electrolytes. For example covalent compounds like glucose, cane sugar, urea, alcohol etc., do not conduct electricity. But compounds like hydrogen chloride gas conduct electricity when dissolved in water. This is due to the fact that hydrogen chloride chemically reacts with water to form hydrochloric acid containing ions.

Hello Points!

The differences between Ionic & Covalent Compounds

ocr_image

EXAMPLE 8

An element A has 4 electrons in the outermost shell of its atom and combines with another element B having 7 electrons in the outermost shell of its atom. The compound formed does not conduct electricity. What is the nature of the chemical bond in the compound? Give the electron-dot structure of its molecule.

The atom of A has 4 valence electrons so it needs 4 more electrons to achieve the stable, 8-electron configuration in the outermost shell. The atom of B has 7 valence electrons, so it needs 1 more electron to complete the 8-electron configuration. Since both the reacting atoms need electrons to achieve the inert gas electron arrangements, they will combine by the sharing of electrons and form covalent bonds. Thus, the nature of chemical bond present in the compound is "covalent bond". The presence of covalent bonds in the compound is confirmed by the fact that the compound does not conduct electricity (only ionic compounds containing ionic bonds conduct electricity). We will now give the electron-dot structure of a molecule of the compound formed.
We have been given that the atom A has 4 valence electrons whereas atom B has 7 valence electrons in it. Now, one atom of A shares its four electrons with four atoms of B to form the covalent molecule AB4.

ocr_image

EXAMPLE 9

What type of bonding would you expect between the following pairs of elements?
(i) Calcium and Oxygen
(ii) Carbon and Chlorine
(iii) Hydrogen and chlorine

(i) Ionic Bonding - Since both elements can lose electrons and can form ions. Thus, they form ionic bonding.
(ii) Covalent Bonding - Since, carbon needs four more electrons to complete its octet, it needs to share its electrons with chlorine so that both can attain stable configuration. Thus, they form covalent bonding.
(iii) Covalent Bonding - Both hydrogen and chlorine need one electron to complete their octet so they share the electron to complete its octet. Thus, they form covalent bonding.

Occurrence of Metals

Ab jaise ki hume pata hai ki earth’s crust major source of metals hota hai. Iske alawa sea water meh metals salts jaise sodium chloride, magnesium chloride etc., present hote hai. Ab kuch metals quite reactive hote hai jis wajah se ye nature meh free elemental state meh exist nahi karte. So mostly metals, inke compounds jaise oxides, carbonates, sulphides, chloride etc., ki form meh find kiye jate hai jisse hum combined state bolte hai. Sirf kuch hi aise reactive metals hote hai jaise copper, silver, gold aur platinum jo free state meh exist karte hai aur tab isse hum native state bhi bolte hai.

Ab reactivity series of metals ke according hum occurrence of metals ko relate kar sakte hai. Isme jo metals reactivity series meh high up hote hai (like potassium, sodium, calcium, magnesium, aluminium) wo kafi reactive hote hai jis wajah se ye nature meh free elemental form meh exist nahi karte hai. Ye hamesha combined state meh find kiye jaate hai. Iske alawa jo metals reactivity series ke middle meh hote hai (like zinc, iron, lead) wo moderately reactive metals hote hai aur ye bhi combined state meh find kiye jaate hai. In fact, jo metals reactivity series meh copper ke above hote hai wo sirf compound form meh find kiye jaate hai. Ab jo metals reactivity series meh quite low present hote hai (like copper, silver, gold, platinum) wo least reactive or unreactive hote hai jis wajah se ye free state meh as metals find kiye jaate hai.

Minerals and Ores
Minerals ko agar hum define kare toh wo natural materials jisme se hum metals or inke compounds ko earth meh found kar sakte hai unhe hum minerals bolte hai. Ab kuch minerals meh large percentage of metals hota hai aur kuch meh small percentage. Iske alawa kuch minerals meh koi bhi objectionable impurities present nahi hoti aur kuch meh objectionable impurities present hoti hai jo extraction of metals ko hamper karta hai. Thus, sabhi minerals se hum metals ko extract nahi kar sakte. So jis minerals se hum metals ko conveniently aur profitably extract kar sakte hai unhe hum ores bolte hai. Ek ore meh metal ki good percentage hoti hai aur isme koi bhi objectionable impurities nahi hoti. Thus, sabhi ores, minerals ho sakti hai lekin sabhi minerals, ores nahi ho sakte. Some of the common ores are given in the following table :

ocr_image

Occurrence of Metals

The earth's crust is the major source of metals. Sea-water also contains salts of metals like sodium chloride, magnesium chloride, etc. Most of the metals are quite reactive and hence they do not occur as free elements in nature. So, most of the metals are found in the form of their compounds (with other elements) called combined state. The compounds of metals found in nature are their oxides, carbonates, sulphides, chlorides, etc. Only a few less reactive metals (like copper, silver, gold and platinum) are found in the 'free state' as metals (because of their low chemical reactivity) due to this, it is said to occur in native state.

We can also relate the occurrence of metals to the reactivity series of metals as follows : The metals which are high up in the reactivity series (like potassium, sodium, calcium, magnesium and aluminium) are so reactive that they are never found in nature as free elements. They are always found in a combined state. The metals placed in the middle of reactivity series (like zinc, iron and lead) are moderately reactive metals which are also found in the combined state. In fact, all the metals which are placed above copper in the reactivity series are found in nature only in the form of their compounds. The metals which are quite low in the reactivity series (such as copper, silver, gold and platinum) are the least reactive or unreactive and hence found in free state as metals.

Minerals and Ores
The natural materials in which the metals or their compounds are found in earth are called minerals. Some minerals may contain a large percentage of metal whereas others may contain only a small percentage of the metal. Some minerals may not contain any objectionable impurities whereas others may contain objectionable impurities which hamper the extraction of metals. Thus, all the minerals cannot be used to extract metals. Those minerals from which the metals can be extracted conveniently and profitably are called ores. An ore contains a good percentage of metal and there are no objectionable impurities in it. Thus, all the ores are minerals, but all the minerals are not ores.

Extraction of Metals

Ek ore meh metal dusre elements ke sath iske compound form meh present hota hai. So ore ke ground se mining ke baad isse pure metal meh convert karna jaruri hota hai. Ab metal ko iske ore se obtain karne ke process ko hum extraction of metal bolte hai. Further, ores ko hum free metals meh number of steps se convert kar sakte hai jo type of the ore used, nature of the impurities present aur reactivity of the metal to be extracted par depend karta hai. So various processes jo extraction of metals from their ores aur refining meh involve hote hai unhe hum metallurgy bolte hai. Extraction of metal from its ore meh three major steps involved hote hai which are as follows :
1) Concentration of Ore (or Enrichment of Ore),
2) Conversion of Concentrated Ore into Metal and
3) Refining (or Purification) of Impure Metal

1) Concentration of Ore (or Enrichment of Ore)
Ore basically metal ka impure compound hota hai jisme large amount meh sand aur rocky material present hote hai. Ab ore meh jo unwanted impurities jaise sand, rocky material, earthy particles, limestone, mica etc., present hote hai unhe hum gangue bolte hai. So kisi bhi metal ko ore se extract karne se pehle sabhi impurities (or gangue) ko remove karna necessary hota hai. Ab ore se gangue particles ko remove karne ke methods difference in physical or chemical properties of the ore aur gangue par depend karte hai. Further, jab hum gangue ko remove kar dete hai tab hume concentrated ore milti hai jisme higher percentage of metal present hota hai. Concentration of ore ko hum enrichment of ore bhi bolte hai.

2) Conversion of Concentrated Ore into Metal
Concentrated ores se metals ko extract karne ke purpose ke liye hum sabhi metals ko 3 categories meh grouped karte hai :
(i) Metals of high reactivity (or highly reactive metals)
(ii) Metals of medium reactivity (or moderately reactive metals)
(iii) Metals of low reactivity (or less reactive metals)

ocr_image


Iss reactivity series meh ye note kiya gaya hai ki carbon ek non-metal hai aur ye zinc ke comparison more reactive hota hai iss wajah se carbon ko reactivity series meh above zinc place kiya jata hai. So carbon yahan oxides of zinc ko reduce kar sakta hai aur iske sath jo metals zinc ke below present hote hai unke oxides ko bhi carbon reduce kar sakta hai.

(i) Extraction of Highly Reactive Metals
Ab highly reactive metals jaise potassium, sodium, calcium, magnesium, aluminium reactivity series ke upper part meh present hote hai. Accordingly, highly reactive metals ke oxides very stable hote hai, jis wajah se inhe hum most common reducing agent carbon se reduce nahi kar sakte to obtain free metals. Kyunki inn metals ki oxygen ke liye more affinity hoti hai with respect to carbon. So, carbon yahan inn metal oxides se oxygen ko remove nahi kar paata aur further inhe free metals meh bhi convert nahi kar paata. Thus, carbon se hum highly reactive metals ko inke oxides se extract nahi kar sakte hai.
Generally, highly reactive metals ko hum electrolytic reduction of their molten chlorides or oxides se extract karte hai. Electrolytic reduction ke liye hum molten salt se electric current pass karte hai aur iss process ko hum electrolysis bolte hai. Ab electrolysis meh negatively charged electrode (cathode) ek powerful reducing agent hoti hai jo electron supply kar metal ions ko metal meh reduce karti hai, matlab yahan metals, cathode (negative electrode) par produced hote hai. Ab electrolysis method se jo metals extract kiye jaate hai wo very pure hote hai aur inme impurities bhi nahi hoti.
(a) Jab hum molten metal chloride ko electrolysed karte hai by passing electric current, tab pure metal cathode (negative electrode) par produced hota hai aur chlorine gas anode (positive electrode) par produced hoti hai.
(b) Similarly, jab hum metal oxide ko electrolysed karte hai by passing electric current, tab bhi pure metal cathode (negative electrode) par produced hota hai whereas oxygen gas anode (positive electrode) par produced hoti hai.

Extraction of Sodium Metal
Sodium metal ko hum electrolytic reduction of molten sodium chloride se extract kar sakte hai. Iske liye jab hum molten sodium chloride se current pass karte hai, tab ye sodium metal aur chlorine gas meh decompose hota hai.
ocr_image


During electrolysis of molten sodium chloride, two electrodes par following reactions hoti hai.
(a) Yahan sodium ions cathode se electrons accept karte hai aur tab ye sodium atoms meh reduced hote hai. Thus, yahan sodium metal cathode (negative electrode) par produced hota hai.
ocr_image


(b) Iske alawa yahan chloride ions anode ko electrons dete hai aur tab ye chlorine gas meh oxidised hote hai. Thus, yahan chlorine gas anode (positive electrode) par produced hoti hai.
ocr_image


Ab sodium metal ki tarah hum potassium metal ko bhi electrolysis of molten potassium chloride (KCl) se, calcium metal ko electrolysis of molten calcium chloride (CaCl2) se aur magnesium metal ko electrolysis of molten magnesium chloride (MgCl2) se extract kar sakte hai.

Extraction of Aluminium Metal
Aluminium metal ko hum electrolytic reduction of molten aluminium oxide se extract kar sakte hai. Iske liye jab hum molten aluminium oxide se current pass karte hai, tab ye aluminium metal aur oxygen gas meh decompose hota hai.
ocr_image


During electrolysis of molten aluminium oxide, two electrodes par following reactions hoti hai.
(a) Yahan aluminium ions cathode se electrons accept karte hai aur tab ye aluminium atoms meh reduced hote hai. Thus, yahan aluminium metal cathode (negative electrode) par produced hota hai.
ocr_image


(b) Yahan oxide ions anode ko electrons dete hai aur tab ye oxygen gas meh oxidised hote hai. Thus, yahan oxygen gas anode (positive electrode) par produced hoti hai.
ocr_image

ocr_image


(ii) Extraction of Moderately Reactive Metals
Moderately reactive metals jaise zinc, iron, lead, tin etc., reactivity series ke middle meh present hote hai. Ab moderately reactive metals jo reactivity series ke middle meh present hote hai unhe hum inke oxides se extract kar sakte hai using carbon, aluminium, sodium or calcium as reducing agent. Inme se kuch moderately reactive metals nature meh as oxides exist karte hai aur kuch as carbonates or sulphides bhi exist karte hai. Nowadays, metals ko inke oxides se (by reduction) easily obtain kiya ja sakta hai as compared from their carbonates or sulphides. So, reduction se pehle ores ko metal oxide meh convert karna necessary hota hai jisse hum tab reduced kar sakte hai. Ab concentrated ores ko metal oxide meh convert hum calcination or roasting process se kar sakte hai. Jahan carbonate ore ko oxide meh convert hum calcination process se karte hai whereas sulphide ore ko oxide meh convert hum roasting process se karte hai.

(i) Calcination process meh hum carbonate ore ko strongly heat karte hai in the absence of air in order to convert it into metal oxide. For example zinc metal occur as zinc carbonate in calamine ore ZnCO3. Yahan zinc metal ko zinc carbonate se extract karne ke liye hum pehle zinc carbonate ko calcination process se zinc oxide meh convert karte hai. So iske liye hum calamine ore (zinc carbonate) ko strongly heat karte hai in the absence of air tab ye calcined hokar zinc oxide aur carbon dioxide meh decompose hota hai.
ocr_image


(ii) Roasting process meh hum sulphide ore ko strongly heat karte hai in the presence of air in order to convert it into metal oxide. For example zinc metal occur as zinc sulphide in zinc blende ore ZnS. Yahan zinc metal ko zinc sulphide se extract karne ke liye hum pehle zinc sulphide ko roasting process se zinc oxide meh convert karte hai. So iske liye hum zinc blende ore (zinc sulphide) ko strongly heat karte hai in the presence of air tab ye roasted hokar zinc oxide aur sulphur dioxide meh decompose hota hai.
ocr_image


Ore ko metal oxide (by calcination or roasting) meh convert karne ke baad inhe hum free metals meh reduce karte hai using reducing agents like carbon, aluminium, sodium or calcium. Yahan reducing agent chemical reactivity of the metal to be extracted par depend karta hai.

a) Reduction of Metal Oxide with Carbon : Ab jo metals carbon se less reactive hote hai jaise zinc, iron, nickel, lead, copper etc., inke oxides ko hum carbon as reducing agent use kar reduce kar sakte hai. Iske liye hum metal oxide ko carbon ke sath furnace meh heat karte hai, jo metal oxide ko free metal meh reduce karta hai. For example, zinc metal ko hum zinc oxide se extract kar sakte hai using carbon as reducing agent.
ocr_image


Similarly, iron metal ko hum oxide ore of iron - haematite (Fe2O3) se extract kar sakte hai. Also, tin, lead metals aur even less reactive metal copper ko bhi hum inke oxides se extract kar sakte hai using carbon as reducing agent.

b) Reduction of Metal Oxide with Aluminium : Ab more reactive metal jaise aluminium ko bhi hum metal extraction from their oxides ke liye as reducing agent use kar sakte hai. Aluminium metal ko hum as reducing agent uss case meh use karte hai jahan metal oxide ka metal as compared to zinc etc., more reactive hota hai i.e., iss metal oxide ko carbon satisfactorily reduce nahi kar paata. Kyunki ek more reactive metal (like aluminium) comparatively less reactive metal ko metal oxide se displace kar free metal deta hai. Thus, displacement reaction ko use kar hum certain metals ko free metals meh reduce kar sakte hai. Ab oxides of metals jaise chromium aur manganese ko carbon satisfactorily reduce nahi karta. So, manganense aur chromium metals ko extract karne ke liye hum inke oxides ko aluminium powder se reduce karte hai. For example manganese metal ko hum manganese dioxide se extract kar sakte hai using aluminium powder as reducing agent.
ocr_image


Yahan reduction reaction of manganese dioxide with aluminium powder highly exothermic reaction hoti hai. Iss reaction meh lot of heat released hoti hai jis wajah se yahan manganese metal jo produced hota hai wo molten state meh hota hai.
Above two discussions ke basis par hum yahan conclude kar sakte hai that two most commonly reducing agents jisse use kar hum metals ko extract kar sakte hai. These are (a) carbon (in the form of coke) and (b) aluminium powder.

(iii) Extraction of Less Reactive Metals
Less reactive metals jaise mercury, copper etc., reactivity series meh quite low placed hote hai. Ab less reactive metals jo reactivity series meh quite low hote hai unhe hum inke oxides se sirf heating se extract kar sakte hai. So mercury aur copper metals ko hum inke oxides se only by heating extract kar sakte hai.

a) Extraction of Mercury : Mercury ek less reactive metal hai jo reactivity series meh quite low present hota hai. Mercury metal ko extract karne ke liye hum iske sulphide ore ko air meh heat karte hai.
So mercury metal ko hum iske sulphide ore jaise cinnabar (HgS) or mercury (II) sulphide se produced kar sakte hai. Iske extraction meh two steps involved hote hai :
(i) Sabse pehle hum concentrated mercury (II) sulphide ore (or cinnabar ore) ko air meh roast karte hai, tab ye mercury (II) oxide form karta hai.
ocr_image


(ii) Iske baad hum mercury (II) oxide ko about 300C par heat karte hai, tab ye reduced (or decomposed) hokar mercury metal form karta hai.
ocr_image


Thus, yahan mercury metal ko hum only heating of mercury (II) oxide se reduce kar produce karte hai.

b) Extraction of Copper : Copper bhi ek less reactive metal hai jo reactivity series meh quite low present hota hai. Copper metal ko extract karne ke liye hum iske bhi sulphide ore ko air meh heat karte hai.
So copper metal ko bhi hum iske sulphide ore jaise copper glance (Cu2S) or copper (I) sulphide se produced kar sakte hai. Iske extraction meh bhi two steps involved hote hai :
(i) Sabse pehle hum concentrated copper (I) sulphide ore (or copper glance ore) ko air meh roast karte hai, tab ye copper (I) oxide meh oxidised hota hai.
ocr_image


(ii) Jab yahan ek good amount of copper (I) sulphide ore copper (I) oxide meh convert ho jata hai tab hum supply of air for roasting ko stop kar dete hai. Ab above step meh jo copper (I) oxide formed hota hai wo in absence of air, remaining copper (I) sulphide ke sath react kar copper metal aur sulphur dioxide form karta hai :
ocr_image


3) Refining of Metals
Jo metals hum various reduction processes se prepared karte hai, unme kuch impurities hoti hai so ye impure hote hai. Ab jin processes se hum impure metals ko purify karte hai unhe hum refining of metals bolte hai. Thus, refining of metals ka matlab purification of metals hota hai. Ab impure metal ko refine karne ke liye hum kaun sa method use karte hai wo nature of metal as well as nature of impurities present par depend karta hai. Different metals ke liye different refining methods use kiye jaate hai. Jisme se most important aur most widely used method for refining impure metals - electrolytic refining hota hai.

Electrolytic Refining : Electrolytic refining ka matlab refining by electrolysis hota hai. Iss method se hum metals jaise copper, zinc, tin, lead, chromium, nickel, silver aur gold ko electrolytically refined karte hai.

Electrolytic Refining of Copper : Copper ki electrolytic refining ke liye following apparatus hota hai.
ocr_image


Iss apparatus meh ek electrolytic tank hota hai jisme acidified copper sulphate solution as electrolyte hota hai (copper sulphate solution is acidified with dilute sulphuric acid). Isme thick block of impure copper metal as anode hota hai (ye +ve terminal of the battery se connected hota hai). Iske alawa yahan ek thin strip of pure copper metal as cathode hoti hai (ye -ve terminal of the battery se connected hoti hai).
Yahan jab hum electric current pass karte hai tab anode se impure copper dissolve hota hai aur copper sulphate solution meh enter karta hai aur tab copper sulphate solution se pure copper metal cathode par deposit bhi hota hai. Further, yahan impure metal meh jo soluble impurities hoti hai wo solution meh hi chali jati hai whereas jo iski insoluble impurities hoti hai wo anode ke bottom meh as anode mud settle hoti hai.

Copper sulphate (CuSO4) solution meh copper (Cu+2) aur sulphate (SO24) ions present hote hai. So jab hum yahan electric current pass karte hai tab two electrodes par following reactions hoti hai :
(i) Copper sulphate meh jo copper ions (Cu+2) hote hai wo negative electrode (cathode) ki taraf move karte hai aur cathode se electron gain karne par ye copper atoms meh reduced hote hai. Thus, yahan copper atoms cathode par deposit hote hai aur hume pure copper metal dete hai.
ocr_image


(ii) Iske alawa impure anode ke copper atoms jab two electrons each to anode ko lose karte hai tab ye copper ions (Cu+2) ions form karte hai jo electrolytic solution meh enter karte hai.
ocr_image


In this way, copper ions are taken from the copper sulphate solution at the cathode and put into the solution at the anode.
Ab impure copper (crude copper) jisse hum refined karte hai usme bhi kuch metallic impurities hoti hai jo either more reactive or less reactive hoti hai. So yahan jo more reactive metal impurity hoti hai jaise iron ye electrolyte solution meh pass karti hai aur wahin rahti hai. On the other hand, yahan jo less reactive metallic impurities hoti hai jaise gold aur silver inko hum electrolytic cell ke bottom se collect karte hai jo anode ke below in the form of anode mud present hoti hai. Thus, gold aur silver metals ko hum anode mud se recovered kar sakte hai. Therefore, electrolytic refining of metals two purposes serve karta hai :
(i) Ye concerned metal ko refine karta hai.
(ii) Ye other valuable metals (like gold or silver) jo metals refining meh as impurities present hote hai unhe bhi recover kar sakta hai.

Hello Points!

For the refining of an impure metal by electrolysis :
(a) A thick block of the impure metal is made anode (It is connected to the positive terminal of the battery).
(b) A thin strip of the pure metal is made cathode (It is connected to the negative terminal of the battery).
(c) A water soluble salt (of the metal to be refined) is taken as electrolyte.
On passing electric current, impure metal dissolves from the anode and goes into the electrolyte solution. And pure metal from the electrolyte deposits on the cathode. The soluble impurities present in the impure metal go into the solution whereas the insoluble impurities settle down at the bottom of the anode as anode mud.

POINT 1

Thermite Reaction
The reduction of a metal oxide to form metal by using aluminium powder as a reducing agent is called a thermite reaction (or thermite process). The reactions of metal oxides with aluminium powder to produce metals are highly exothermic in which a large amount of heat is evolved. In fact, the amount of heat evolved is so large that the metals are produced in the molten state. This property of the reduction by aluminium is made use of in thermite welding for joining the broken pieces of heavy iron objects girders; railway tracks or cracked machine parts. This is done as follows :
A mixture of iron (III) oxide and aluminium powder is ignited with a burning magnesium ribbon. Aluminium reduces iron oxide to produce iron metal with the evolution of a lot of heat. Due to this heat, iron metal is produced in the molten state.

ocr_image


The molten iron is then poured between the broken iron pieces to weld them (to join them). This process is called aluminothermy or thermite welding. Thus, thermite welding makes use of the reducing property of aluminium.
ocr_image

Extraction of Metals

An ore contains a metal in the form of its compound with other elements. So, after the mining of the ore from the ground, it must be converted into pure metal. To obtain a metal from its ore is called the extraction of metal. The ores are converted into free metals by a number of steps which depend on the type of the ore used, nature of the impurities present and reactivity of the metal to be extracted. The various processes involved in the extraction of metals from their ores, and refining are known as metallurgy. The three major steps involved in the extraction of a metal from its ore are :
1) Concentration of Ore (or Enrichment of Ore),
2) Conversion of Concentrated Ore into Metal and
3) Refining (or Purification) of Impure Metal

1) Concentration of Ore (or Enrichment of Ore)
Ore is an impure compound of a metal containing a large amount of sand and rocky material. The unwanted impurities like sand, rocky material, earthy particles, limestone, mica, etc., present in an ore are called gangue. Before extracting the metal from an ore, it is necessary to remove these impurities (or gangue). The methods used for removing gangue from ore depend on some difference in the physical properties or chemical properties of the ore and gangue. By removing the gangue, we get a concentrated ore containing a much higher percentage of the metal. Concentration of ore is also known as enrichment of ore.

2) Conversion of Concentrated Ore into Metal
For the purpose of extracting metals from the concentrated ores, we can group all the metals into following three categories :
(i) Metals of high reactivity (or highly reactive metals)
(ii) Metals of medium reactivity (or moderately reactive metals)
(iii) Metals of low reactivity (or less reactive metals)

ocr_image


Here, carbon (C), which is a non-metal, is more reactive than zinc and it can be placed just above Zn in the reactivity series. So, carbon can reduce the oxides of zinc and of all other metals below zinc to form metals.

(i) Extraction of Highly Reactive Metals
The highly reactive metals such as potassium, sodium, calcium, magnesium and aluminium are placed high up in the reactivity series in its upper part. Accordingly, the oxides of highly reactive metals (like potassium, sodium, calcium, magnesium and aluminium) are very stable and cannot be reduced by the most common reducing agent carbon to obtain free metals. This is because these metals have more affinity (more attraction) for oxygen than carbon. So, carbon is unable to remove oxygen from these metal oxides and hence cannot convert them into free metals. Thus, the highly reactive metals cannot be extracted by reducing their oxides with carbon.
Generally, the highly reactive metals are extracted by the electrolytic reduction of their molten chlorides or oxides. Electrolytic reduction is brought about by passing electric current through the molten salt. This process is called electrolysis (which means splitting by electricity). During electrolysis, the negatively charged electrode (cathode) acts as a powerful reducing agent by supplying electrons to reduce the metal ions into metal, which means here metals are produced at cathode (negative electrode). The metals extracted by electrolysis method are very pure. They do not contain any impurities.
(a) When a molten metal chloride is electrolysed by passing electric current, then pure metal is produced at the cathode (negative electrode) and chlorine gas is formed at the anode (positive electrode).
(b) Similarly, when a molten metal oxide is electrolysed by passing electric current, then pure metal is produced at the cathode (negative electrode) whereas oxygen gas is formed at the anode (positive electrode).

Extraction of Sodium Metal
Sodium metal is extracted by the electrolytic reduction (or electrolysis) of molten sodium chloride. When electric current is passed through molten sodium chloride, it decomposes to form sodium metal and chlorine gas :
ocr_image


During the electrolysis of molten sodium chloride, the following reactions take place at the two electrodes :
(a) The sodium ions take electrons from the cathode and get reduced to form sodium atoms (or sodium metal). Thus, sodium metal is produced at the cathode (negative electrode).
ocr_image


(b) The chloride ions give electrons to the anode and get oxidised to form chlorine gas. Thus, chlorine gas is formed at the anode (positive electrode).
ocr_image


It is also noted that just like sodium metal, potassium metal is produced by the electrolysis of molten potassium chloride (KCl); calcium metal is obtained by the electrolysis of molten calcium chloride (CaCl2); and magnesium metal is extracted by the electrolysis of molten magnesium chloride (MgCl2).

Extraction of Aluminium Metal
Aluminium metal is extracted by the electrolytic reduction (or electrolysis) of molten aluminium oxide. When electric current is passed through molten aluminium oxide, it decomposes to form aluminium metal and oxygen gas :
ocr_image


During the electrolysis of molten aluminium oxide, the following reactions take place at the two electrodes :
(a) The aluminium ions accept electrons from the cathode and get reduced to form aluminium atoms (or aluminium metal). Thus, aluminium metal is produced at the cathode (negative electrode).
ocr_image


(b) The oxide ions give electrons to the anode and get oxidised to form oxygen gas. Thus, oxygen gas is formed at the anode (positive electrode).
ocr_image

ocr_image


(ii) Extraction of Moderately Reactive Metals
The moderately reactive metals such as zinc, iron, tin and lead, etc., are placed in the middle of the reactivity series. The moderately reactive metals which are in the middle of reactivity series are extracted by the reduction of their oxides with carbon, aluminium, sodium or calcium. Some of the moderately reactive metals occur in nature as oxides but others occur as their carbonate or sulphide ores. Now, it is easier to obtain metals from their oxides (by reduction) than from carbonates or sulphides. So, before reduction can be done, the ore must be converted into metal oxide which can then be reduced. The concentrated ores can be converted into metal oxide by the process of calcination or roasting. The method to be used depends on the nature of the ore. A carbonate ore is converted into oxide by calcination whereas a sulphide ore is converted into oxide by roasting.

(i) Calcination is the process in which a carbonate ore is heated strongly in the absence of air to convert it into metal oxide. For example zinc occurs as zinc carbonate in calamine ore, ZnCO3. So, in order to extract zinc metal from zinc carbonate, this zinc carbonate should be first converted into zinc oxide. This is done by calcination. Thus, when calamine ore (zinc carbonate) is heated strongly in the absence of air, that is, when calamine is calcined, it decomposes to form zinc oxide and carbon dioxide :
ocr_image


(ii) Roasting is the process in which a sulphide ore is strongly heated in the presence of air to convert it into metal oxide. For example, zinc occurs as sulphide in zinc blende ore, ZnS. So, in order to extract zinc metal from zinc sulphide, this zinc sulphide has to be converted into zinc oxide first. This is done by roasting. When zinc blende ore (zinc sulphide) is strongly heated in air (roasted), it forms zinc oxide and sulphur dioxide :
ocr_image


The metal oxides (obtained by calcination or roasting of ores) are converted to the free metal by using reducing agents like carbon, aluminium, sodium or calcium. The reducing agent used depends on the chemical reactivity of the metal to be extracted.

a) Reduction of Metal Oxide with Carbon : The oxides of comparatively less reactive metals like zinc, iron, nickel, tin, lead and copper, are usually reduced by using carbon as the reducing agent. In the reduction by carbon, the metal oxide is mixed with carbon (in the form of coke) and heated in a furnace. Carbon reduces the metal oxide to free metal. For example, Zinc metal is extracted by the reduction of its oxide with carbon (or coke). Thus, when zinc oxide is heated with carbon, zinc metal is produced :
ocr_image


Similarly iron metal is extracted from its oxide ore haematite (Fe2O3) by reduction with carbon (in the form of coke). Tin, lead and even the less reactive metal copper are also extracted by the reduction of their oxides with carbon.

b) Reduction of Metal Oxide with Aluminium : A more reactive metal like aluminium can also be used as a reducing agent in the extraction of metals from their oxides. Aluminium is used as a reducing agent in those cases where the metal oxide is of a comparatively more reactive metal than zinc, etc., which cannot be satisfactorily reduced by carbon. This is because a more reactive metal (like aluminium) can displace a comparatively less reactive metal from its metal oxide to give free metal. Thus, displacement reactions can also be used to reduce certain metal oxides into free metals. For example, the oxides of chromium and manganese metals are not satisfactorily reduced by carbon. So, manganese and chromium metals are extracted by the reduction of their oxides with aluminium powder. For example manganese dioxide is heated with aluminium powder, then manganese metal is produced.
ocr_image


The reduction of manganese dioxide with aluminium is a highly exothermic reaction. A lot of heat is released during this reaction because of which the manganese metal produced is in the molten state (or liquid state).
From above two discussions we conclude that the two reducing agents which are commonly used in the extraction of metals are - (a) carbon (in the form of coke) and (b) aluminium powder

(iii) Extraction of Less Reactive Metals
The less reactive metals such as mercury and copper, etc., are placed quite low in the reactivity series. The less reactive metals which are quite low in the activity series are extracted by the reduction of their oxides by heat alone. For example, mercury and copper are extracted by the reduction of their oxides by heat alone.

a) Extraction of Mercury : Mercury is a less reactive metal which is quite low in the activity series. Mercury metal can be extracted just by heating its sulphide ore in air.
Mercury metal is produced from the sulphide ore called cinnabar, HgS, which is actually mercury (II) sulphide. The extraction of mercury from cinnabar ore involves the following two steps :
(i) The concentrated mercuric (II) sulphide ore (cinnabar ore) is roasted in air when mercury (II) oxide is formed :
ocr_image


(ii) When this mercury (II) oxide is heated to about 300C it decomposes (gets reduced) to form mercury metal :
ocr_image


Thus, here mercury metal has been produced by the reduction of mercury (II) oxide by heat alone.

b) Extraction of Copper : Copper is a less reactive metal which is quite low in the reactivity series. Copper metal can be extracted just by heating its sulphide ore in air.
One of the ores from which copper metal is produced is copper glance, Cu2S, which is actually copper (I) sulphide. The extraction of copper from copper glance ore involves the following two steps :
(i) The concentrated copper (I) sulphide ore (copper glance) is roasted in air when a part of copper (I) sulphide is oxidised to copper (I) oxide :
ocr_image


(ii) When a good amount of copper (I) sulphide has been converted into copper (I) oxide, then the supply of air for roasting is stopped. In the absence of air, copper (I) oxide formed above reacts with the remaining copper (I) sulphide to form copper metal and sulphur dioxide :
ocr_image


3) Refining Of Metals
The metals prepared by the various reduction processes usually contain some impurities, so they are impure. The process of purifying impure metals is called refining of metals. Thus, refining of metals means purification of metals. The method to be used for refining an impure metal depends on the nature of metal as well as on the nature of impurities present in it. Different refining methods are used for different metals. The most important and most widely used method for refining impure metals is electrolytic refining.

Electrolytic Refining : Electrolytic refining means refining by electrolysis. Many metals like copper, zinc, tin, lead, chromium, nickel, silver and gold are refined electrolytically.

Electrolytic Refining of Copper : The apparatus used for the electrolytic refining of copper has been shown below.
ocr_image


The apparatus consists of an electrolytic tank containing acidified copper sulphate solution as electrolyte (copper sulphate solution is acidified with dilute sulphuric acid). A thick block of impure copper metal is made anode (it is connected to the +ve terminal of the battery), and a thin strip of pure copper metal is made cathode (it is connected to the —ve terminal of the battery).
On passing electric current, impure copper from the anode dissolves and goes into copper sulphate solution, and pure copper from the copper sulphate solution deposits on cathode. Thus, pure copper metal is produced on the cathode. The soluble impurities go into the solution whereas insoluble impurities collect below the anode as anode mud.

Copper sulphate solution (CuSO4 solution) contains copper ions, (Cu+2) and sulphate (SO24) ions. On passing the electric current through copper sulphate solution, the following reactions take place at the two electrodes :
(i) The positively charged copper ions, (Cu+2) from the copper sulphate solution go to the negative electrode (cathode) and by taking electrons from the cathode, get reduced to copper atoms. These copper atoms get deposited on cathode giving pure copper metal.
ocr_image


(ii) Copper atoms of the impure anode lose two electrons each to anode and form (Cu+2) ions which go into the electrolyte solution.
ocr_image


In this way copper ions are taken copper sulphate solution at the cathode and put into the solution at the anode.
The metallic impurities present in the impure copper (crude copper) which is being refined can either be more reactive or less reactive. Now, the more reactive metals like iron present in impure copper, pass into the electrolyte solution and remain there. On the other hand, the less reactive metals like gold and silver present in the impure copper, collect at the bottom of the electrolytic cell below the anode in the form of anode mud. Thus, gold and silver metals can be recovered from the anode mud. Therefore, the electrolytic refining of metals serves two purposes :
(i) It refines (purifies) the metal concerned.
(ii) It enables the recovery of other valuable metals (like gold and silver) present as impurities in the metal being refined.

EXAMPLE 10

Two ores A and B were taken. On heating, ore A gives CO2 whereas, ore B gives SO2. What steps will you take to convert them into metals ?

Since the ore A of the metal gives CO2 upon heating, it is some metal carbonate (MCO3). It can be converted to the metallic form as follows :
Calcination : MCO3(s)heatMO(s)+CO2(g)
Smelting : MO(s)+C(s)(coke)heatM(s)+CO(g)
Since the ore Y of the metal gives SO2 upon heating, it can be some metal sulphide (MS). It can be converted to the metallic form as follows :
Roasting : 2MS(s)+3O2(g)2MO(s)+2SO2(g)
Reduction : MO(s)+C(s)(coke)M(s)+CO(g)

Corrosion & Its Preventions

Agar koi metal reactive hota hai tab iske surface par atmosphere meh present air aur water slowly attack karte hai aur tab metal ke surface par compounds ka formation hota hai. Ab inn compounds formation ki wajah se metal tarnish ho jata hai i.e., tab metal surface ka appearance dull ho jata hai. Ab jo compounds metal surface par formed hote hai wo usually porous hote hai aur ye surface of metal se gradually fall karte hai aur tab metal ke niche se air aur water fir se attack karte hai aur ye process chalta rahta hai. So, iss tarah action of water aur air gradually whole metal ko eats up karta hai. Iss basis par hum corrosion ko following way meh define kar sakte hai.
The eating up of metals by the action of air, moisture or a chemical (such as acid) on their surface is called corrosion.
Most of the metals ko jab hum damp air (moist air) meh exposed karte hai tab ye corrode hota hai. For example jab hum iron metal ko considerable time ke liye damp air meh exposed karte hai tab ye corrode hota hai matlab tab iron metal ke surface par red-brown substance form hota hai jisse hum rust bolte hai. Ab yahan rust porous aur soft hoti hai aur ye surface of iron object se gradually fall karti hai and then iron below starts corroding. Thus, corrosion of iron ek continuous process hai jo ultimately whole iron object ko eats up kar leta hai.
In general, jo metal more reactive hota hai wo utni readily corrode hota hai. Corrosion of iron ko hum rusting bolte hai aur ye jo compound form karta hai usse rust bolte hai.

ocr_image


Rusting of Iron
Jab ek iron object ko hum damp air (or moist air) meh considerable time ke liye rakhte hai, tab ye red-brown flaky substance se covered ho jata hai jisse hum rust bolte hai aur iss process ko hum rusting of iron bolte hai.
Ab during rusting of iron, iron metal oxygen of air in the presence of water ke sath combine kar hydrated iron (III) oxide Fe2O3.xH2O form karta hai. Iss hydrated iron (III) oxide ko hum rust bolte hai. So, rust mainly hydrated iron (III) oxide Fe2O3.xH2O hota hai (yahan number of molecules of water x hai jo fixed nahi hote hai). Rust red-brown in colour hoti hai. For example iron nails, screws, pipes, railings etc., par generally red-brown rust hoti hai.

Conditions Necessary for the Rusting of Iron
Rusting of iron (or corrosion of iron) ke liye both air aur water required hote hai. Thus, two conditions jo rusting of iron hone ke liye necessary hoti hai :
(i) Presence of air (or oxygen)
(ii) Presence of water (or moisture)
Ab jaise ki hume pata hai ki iron ki rusting damp air (moist air) or water meh hoti hai. Ab damp air (moist air) meh water vapour bhi present hote hai so accordingly hum yahan kah sakte hai ki damp air (moist air) hume rusting of iron ke liye dono things supply karti hai. Iske alawa ordinary water meh some air dissolved hoti hai. So ordinary water bhi hume rusting of iron ke liye dono things supply karta hai.

Prevention of Rusting
Ab rusting of iron ki wajah se country’s economy ko big loss hota hai so iron objects ko rusting (or corrosion) se protect karne ke liye hum several methods use karte hai. Most of the methods meh hum iron object ko kisi cheez se coat karte hai to keep out air aur water. Ab hum rusting of iron ko prevent karne ke liye common methods discuss karte hai.
1) By Painting : Jab hum surface of iron ko paint se coat karte hai tab iss method se hum rusting of iron ko prevent kar sakte hai aur ye most common method of prevention hota hai. So jab hum iron object ke surface par coat of paint apply karte hai tab ye air aur water ke contact meh nahi aata matlab tab iron objects ki rusting nahi hoti. Iron articles jaise window grills, railings, steel furniture, iron pipes, iron bridges, railway coaches, ships, bodies of cars, buses, trucks etc., inn sabhi objects ko paint kiya jata hai to protect them from rusting.
2) By Applying Grease/Oil : Jab hum iron object ke surface par grease or oil apply karte hai tab bhi ye air aur moisture ke contact meh nahi aate, matlab iss tarah bhi hum rusting ko prevent kar sakte hai. For example tools aur machine parts iron aur steel se form hote hai so inhe bhi hum grease or oil se coat karte hai to prevent their rusting.
ocr_image


3) Galvanisation : Jis process meh hum iron object ke oopar zinc metal ki thin layer ko deposit karte hai usse hum galvanisation bolte hai. So iss process meh hum iron object ko molten zinc metal meh dipped karte hai, then yahan thin layer of zinc metal all over the iron object formed hoti hai. Ab ye thin layer of zinc metal, iron object ke surface ko rusting se protect karti hai kyunki zinc metal damp air ke exposure meh corrode nahi hota hai. For example iron sheets ko hum buckets, drums, dustbins, sheds (roofs) making ke liye use karte hai aur inhe hum galvanised karte hai to prevent their rusting.
Ab kyunki zinc ek quite reactive metal hai aur jab air zinc metal ke sath react karti hai tab ye very thin coating of zinc oxide all over it form karti hai. Ye zinc oxide ki coating hard aur impervious to air hoti hai, hence ye zinc metal ki further corrosion ko prevent karti hai (air hard zinc oxide ki coating ke through pass nahi hoti). So jab zinc metal ki layer iron object par deposit hoti hai, tab iske surface par zinc oxide ki coating formed hoti hai jo zinc layer ke zinc metal aur iron below it ko protect karti hai. Ab yahan ye note kiya gaya hai ki galvanised iron object rusting ke against protected rahta hai even yahan zinc layer break ho jaye kyunki yahan zinc metal more easily oxidised hota hai as compare to iron, matlab tab yahan zinc ka corrosion ho sakta hai lekin iron ka nahi hota.
4) By Chromium / Tin Plating : Tin aur chromium metals corrosion ke towards resistance show karte hai. So, jab hum tin (or chromium) metal ki thin layer ko iron aur steel objects par electroplating se deposit karte hai, tab iron aur steel objects corrosion se protected rahte hai. For example, tin metal ko hum tiffin-boxes ki plating ke liye use karte hai kyunki tin non-poisonous hota hai aur isme food bhi contaminate nahi hota hai. Similarly, taps, bicycle handlebars, car bumpers ki rusting prevent karne ke liye hum inn materials par chromium metal se plating karte hai jo inko shiny appearance bhi deta hai.
ocr_image


5) By alloying to make Stainless Steel
Jab iron metal, chromium aur nickel metals ke sath alloy form karta hai tab uss substance ko hum stainless steel bolte hai. Stainless steel rusting show nahi karta. For example cooking utensils, knives, scissors, surgical instruments etc., ye sabhi stainless steel se form hote hai aur ye rusting show nahi karte.

Corrosion of Aluminium
Jab hum shining aluminium vessel ko moist air meh exposed karte hai, tab oxygen of air aluminium ke sath react kar thin, dull layer of aluminium oxide all over the vessel form karti hai, matlab tab yahan aluminium metal ka corrosion hota hai. Ab iss dull layer of aluminium oxide ki formation ki wajah se aluminium vessel apni shine very soon after use loose karta hai. Since aluminium metal in comparison to iron metal, more reactive hota hai so fresh aluminium metal jab moist air ke contact meh aata hai tab ye quickly corrode hota hai, matlab tab ye thin layer of aluminium oxide all over the aluminium metal quickly form karta hai. Ab yahan jo thin aluminium oxide layer form hoti hai wo very tough hoti hai aur ye metal ko further corrosion se bhi prevent karti hai (as moist air aluminium oxide layer ke through pass nahi hoti). In this way, aluminium objects ke surface par jo thin aluminium oxide layer formed hoti hai wo metal ke further corrosion ko prevent karti hai. Iska matlab sometimes corrosion useful hoti hai.

Note : Yahan ye note kiya jata hai ki aluminium articles (jaise aluminium vessels) ko water aur air attacked nahi karte due to the presence of protective oxide layer, jis wajah se ye easily corrode nahi hote. Thus, common metal - aluminium highly resistant to corrosion hota hai.

Aluminium objects ke surface par jo aluminium oxide layer hoti hai usse hum somehow electrolysis se thicker kar sakte hai aur tab hum aluminium objects ko corrosion se more effectively protect kar sakte hai. Iss process ko hum anodising bolte hai.
Iss process meh anode (positive electrode) aluminium object ki hoti hai in an electrolytic tank jisme dilute sulphuric acid solution electrolysed hota hai. Ab during electrolysis of dilute sulphuric acid, oxygen gas anode par liberate hoti hai aur tab ye aluminium object ke sath react kar iske surface par thicker layer of aluminium oxide form karti hai. Ab ye thicker aur more uniform aluminium oxide layer aluminium object ko corrosion se more effectively protect karti hai. Thus, anodising process meh aluminium object par ek thick layer of aluminium oxide form hoti hai by making it anode during electrolysis of dilute sulphuric acid. Aluminium objects jaise pressure cookers, cooking utensils, saucepans, window frames etc., ko hum corrosion se protect karne ke liye anodised karte hai.

Corrosion of Copper
Jab hum copper object ko considerable time ke liye damp air meh exposed karte hai, tab copper metal carbon dioxide aur water of air ke sath slowly react kar green coating of basic copper carbonate on the surface of the object par formed karta hai, jo yahan corrosion of copper ko explain karta hai.

Note : Yahan ye note kiya gaya hai ki green coating of basic copper carbonate mixture of copper carbonate aur copper hydroxide CuCO3.Cu(OH)2 hota hai. Since copper metal reactivity series meh low present hota hai, therefore copper metal ka corrosion very very slow hota hai. Ab jo corroded copper vessels hoti hai usse hum dilute acid solution se cleaned kar sakte hai. Yahan acid solution corroded copper vessels meh jo green coloured basic copper carbonate hota hai usse dissolved karta hai aur tab ye unhe shiny, red brown appearance fir se deta hai.

Corrosion of Silver
Jab hum silver objects ko air meh exposed karte hai tab ye tarnished hote hai aur gradually black ho jate hai. Isko hum following way meh explain kar sakte hai - Silver ek highly unreactive metal hai so ye oxygen of air ke sath easily react nahi karta. Lekin air meh kuch sulphur compounds bhi hote hai jaise hydrogen sulphide (H2S), so silver objects jab air meh present hydrogen sulphide ke sath react karte hai tab ye black coating of silver sulphide (Ag2S) form karte hai. So jab silver objects ke surface par silver sulphide ki coating form hoti hai tab ye tarnished hote hai. Thus, air meh present hydrogen sulphide ke action se silver ornaments gradually black meh change hote hai due to the formation of thin silver sulphide layer on their surface. Since silver ek bright aur shiny metal hota hai jo chemically quite unreactive hota hai. Ye apni shine slowly lose kar dull ho jata hai. Thus, silver metal fairly resistant to corrosion hota hai. Silver metal ko hum silver coins, jewellery, silverware form karne ke liye use karte hai kyunki iska bright shiny surface hota hai aur ye resistance to corrosion show karta hai.

The case of Gold and Platinum
Gold yellow coloured shining metal hai jisse jab hum atmosphere meh exposed karte hai tab ye corrode nahi hota hai kyunki ye highly unreactive metal hota hai matlab ye air, water vapour aur other gases in atmosphere ke action se unaffected rahta hai. Gold metal tarnish nahi hota aur ye apne lustre (chamak) ko years tak retain kar sakta hai. Since gold corrode nahi hota hai isliye gold ornaments ko hum even after several years bhi use kar sakte hai. So we can say Gold ko jum jewellery making ke liye use karte hai kyunki iska bright shiny surface hota hai aur ye corrosion ke towards high resistance show karta hai. Yahan ye note kiya jata hai ki gold ornaments time ke sath dull hone lagte hai matlab ye apni shine loose karte hai, so iske liye hum jewellers se isse polished karwa sakte hai. Iske alawa gold metal sirf aqua regia meh dissolve hota hai.
Another metal Platinum bhi highly resistant to corrosion hota hai aur ye bhi sirf aqua regia meh dissolved hota hai. Platinum ek white metal hai with a silvery shine. Thus, platinum metal ko hum jewellery making ke liye use karte hai kyunki iska bright shiny surface hota hai aur ye bhi corrosion ke towards high resistance show karta hai.

Hello Points!

Experiment to Show that Rusting of Iron Requires Both Air and Water
We take three test-tubes and put one clean iron nail in each of the three test-tubes :
1) In the first test-tube containing iron nail, we put some anhydrous calcium chloride and close its mouth with a tight cork (see Fig. a). The anhydrous calcium chloride is added to absorb water (or moisture) from the damp air present in the test-tube and make it dry. In this way, the iron nail in the first test-tube is kept in dry air (having no water vapour in it). This test-tube is kept aside for about one week.
2) In the second test-tube containing iron nail, we put boiled distilled water (see Fig. b). Boiled water does not contain any dissolved air (or oxygen) in it (This is because the process of boiling removes all the dissolved air from it). A layer of oil is put over boiled water in the test-tube to prevent the outside air from mixing with boiled water. In this way, the iron nail in the second test-tube is kept in air-free, boiled water. The mouth of this test-tube is closed with a cork and it is kept aside for about one week.

ocr_image


3) In the third test-tube containing an iron nail, we put over boiled water so that about two-thirds of the nail is immersed in water and the rest is above the water, exposed to damp air (see Fig. c). In this way, the iron nail in the third test-tube has been placed in air and water together. The mouth of this test-tube is closed with a cork and it is also kept aside for about one week.
After one week, we observe the iron nails kept in all the three test-tubes, one by one. We find that :
(i) No rust is seen on the surface of the iron nail kept in dry air (water-free air) in the first test-tube (see Fig. a). This tells us that rusting of iron does not take place in air alone.
(ii) No rust is seen on the surface of the iron nail kept in air-free, boiled water in the second test-tube (see Fig. b). This tells us that rusting of iron does not take place in water alone.
(iii) Red-brown rust is seen on the surface of an iron nail kept in the presence of both air and water together in the third test-tube (see Fig. c). This tells us that rusting of iron takes place in the presence of both air and water together.
The above experiment shows that for the rusting of iron to take place, both air (oxygen) and water (moisture) are essential. This means that the rusting of iron objects can be prevented if damp air is not allowed to come in contact with Iron objects.

Corrosion & Its Preventions

If a metal is reactive, its surface may be attacked slowly by the air and water (moisture) in the atmosphere. Metal reacts with the oxygen of air and water vapour of air forming compounds on its surface. The formation of these compounds tarnishes the metal, that is, it makes the surface of metal appear dull. The compounds formed on the surface of metal are usually porous and gradually fall off from the surface of metal, and then the metal underneath is attacked by air and water. This process goes on and on. In this way, the action of air and water gradually eats up the whole metal. We can now define corrosion as follows.
The eating up of metals by the action of air, moisture or a chemical (such as acid) on their surface is called corrosion.
Most of the metals corrode when they are kept exposed to damp air (or moist air). For example, iron metal corrodes when kept in damp air for a considerable time. When an iron object is kept in damp air for a considerable time, then a red-brown substance called rust is formed on its surface. Rust is soft and porous, and it gradually falls off from the surface of the iron object, and then the iron below starts corroding. Thus, corrosion of iron is a continuous process which ultimately eats up the whole iron object.
In general, the more reactive a metal is, the more readily it corrodes. The corrosion of iron is called rusting. While other metals are said to corrode, iron metal is said to rust.

ocr_image


Rusting of Iron
When an iron object is left in damp air (or water) for a considerable time, it gets covered with a red-brown flaky substance called rust. This is called rusting of iron.
During the rusting of iron, iron metal combines with the oxygen of air in the presence of water to form hydrated iron (Ill) oxide, Fe2O3.xH2O. This hydrated iron (III) oxide is called rust. So, rust is mainly hydrated iron (III) oxide, Fe2O3.xH2O (the number of molecules of water x varies, it is not fixed). Rust is red-brown in colour. We have all seen iron nails, screws, pipes and railings covered with red-brown rust here and there.

Conditions Necessary for the Rusting of Iron
Rusting of iron (or corrosion of iron) needs both, air and water. Thus, two conditions are necessary for the rusting of iron to take place :
(i) Presence of air (or oxygen)
(ii) Presence of water (or moisture)
We know that iron rusts when placed in damp air (moist air) or when placed in water. Now, damp air (or moist air) also contains water vapour. Thus, damp air (moist air) alone supplies both the things, air and water, required for the rusting of iron. Again, ordinary water has always some air dissolved in it. So, ordinary water alone also supplies both the things, air and water, needed for rusting.

Prevention of Rusting
The wasting of iron objects due to rusting causes a big loss to the country's economy, so it must be prevented by using several methods. Most of the methods involve coating the iron object with something to keep out air and water (which cause rusting). The various common methods of preventing the rusting of iron (or corrosion of iron) are given below :
1) By Painting : The most common method of preventing the rusting of iron (or corrosion of iron) is to coat its surface with a paint. When a coat of paint is applied to the surface of an iron object, then air and moisture cannot come in contact with the iron object and hence no rusting takes place. The iron articles such as window grills, railings, steel furniture, iron pipes, iron bridges, railway coaches, ships, and bodies of cars, buses and trucks, etc., are all painted to protect them from rusting.
2) By Applying Grease/Oil : When some grease or oil is applied to the surface of an iron object, then air and moisture cannot come in contact with it and hence rusting is prevented. For example, the tools and machine parts made of iron and steel are smeared with grease or oil to prevent their rusting.
ocr_image


3) Galvanisation : The process of depositing a thin layer of zinc metal on iron objects is called galvanisation. Galvanisation is done by dipping an iron object in molten zinc metal. A thin layer of zinc metal is then formed all over the iron object. This thin layer of zinc metal on the surface of iron objects protects them from rusting because zinc metal does not corrode on exposure to damp air. The iron sheets used for making buckets, drums, dust-bins and sheds (roofs) are galvanised to prevent their rusting.
Since, zinc is a quite reactive metal. The action of air on zinc metal forms a very thin coating of zinc oxide all over it. This zinc oxide coating is hard and impervious to air and hence prevents the further corrosion of zinc metal (because air is not able to pass through this hard zinc oxide coating). So, when a layer of zinc metal is deposited on an iron object, then the zinc oxide coating formed on its surface protects the zinc metal of the zinc layer as well as the iron below it. Here it is noted that the galvanised iron object remains protected against rusting even if a break occurs in the zinc layer. This is because zinc is more easily oxidised than iron which means here zinc continues to corrode but iron object does not corrode.
4) By Chromium / Tin Plating : Tin and chromium metals are resistant to corrosion. So, when a thin layer of tin metal (or chromium metal) is deposited on iron and steel objects by electroplating, then the iron and steel objects are protected from rusting. For example, tin is used for plating tiffin-boxes because it is non-poisonous and hence does not contaminate the food kept in them. Chromium-plating is done on taps, bicycle handlebars and car bumpers made of iron and steel to protect them from rusting and give them a shiny appearance.
ocr_image


5) By alloying to make Stainless Steel
When iron is alloyed with chromium and nickel, then stainless steel is obtained. Stainless steel does not rust at all. Cooking utensils, knives, scissors and surgical instruments, etc., are made of stainless steel and do not rust at all.

Corrosion of Aluminium
When a shining aluminium vessel is exposed to moist air, the oxygen of air reacts with aluminium to form a thin, dull layer of aluminium oxide all over the vessel which means here aluminium metal undergoes corrosion. Due to the formation of a dull layer of aluminium oxide on exposure to moist air, the aluminium vessel loses its shine very soon after use. Since aluminium metal is more reactive than iron. So, fresh aluminium metal begins to corrode quickly when it comes in contact with moist air. The action of moist air on aluminium metal forms a thin layer of aluminium oxide all over the aluminium metal. This aluminium oxide layer is very tough and prevents the metal underneath from further corrosion (because moist air is not able to pass through this aluminium oxide layer). In this way, a thin aluminium oxide layer formed on the surface of aluminium objects protects them from further corrosion. This means that sometimes corrosion is useful.

Note : It is noted that the aluminium articles (like aluminium vessels) are not attacked by air and water due to the presence of protective oxide layer, and hence not easily corroded. Thus, a common metal which is highly resistant to corrosion is aluminium.

The layer of aluminium oxide on the surface of aluminium objects can be made thicker by electrolysis (to give them even more protection from corrosion). This process is called anodising.
In this process, the aluminium object is made an anode (positive electrode) in an electrolytic tank in which dilute sulphuric acid is electrolysed. During the electrolysis of dilute sulphuric acid, oxygen gas is liberated at the anode and reacts with the aluminium object to form a thicker layer of aluminium oxide on its surface. This thicker and more uniform aluminium oxide layer protects the aluminium object from corrosion very effectively. Thus, anodising is a process of forming a thick layer of aluminium oxide on an aluminium object by making it anode during the electrolysis of dilute sulphuric acid. The aluminium objects like pressure cookers, cooking utensils, saucepans, and window frames, etc., are anodised to protect them from corrosion.

Corrosion of Copper
When a copper object remains in damp air for a considerable time, then copper reacts slowly with the carbon dioxide and water of air to form a green coating of basic copper carbonate on the surface of the object which explains the corrosion of copper.

Note : It is noted that the green coating of basic copper carbonate is a mixture of copper carbonate and copper hydroxide, CuCO3.Cu(OH)2. Since copper metal is low in the reactivity series, therefore, the corrosion of copper metal is very, very slow. The corroded copper vessels can be cleaned with dilute acid solution. The acid solution dissolves green coloured basic copper carbonate present on the corroded copper vessels and makes them look shiny, red-brown again.

Corrosion of Silver
When silver objects are kept in air, they get tarnished and gradually turn black. This can be explained as follows : Silver is a highly unreactive metal so it does not react with the oxygen of air easily. But air usually contains a little of sulphur compounds such as hydrogen sulphide gas (H2S). So, the silver objects combine slowly with the hydrogen sulphide gas present in air to form a black coating of silver sulphide (Ag2S). The shining silver objects become tarnished due to the formation of silver sulphide coating on their surface. Thus, silver ornaments (and other silver articles) gradually turn black due to the formation of a thin silver sulphide layer on their surface by the action of hydrogen sulphide gas present in air. Silver is a bright, shiny metal which is chemically quite unreactive. Silver metal loses its shine and becomes dull (or tarnished) very slowly. Thus, silver metal is fairly resistant to corrosion. Silver metal is used to make silver coins, jewellery and silverware because of its bright shiny surface and resistance to corrosion.

The Case of Gold and Platinum
Gold is a yellow, shining metal. Gold metal does not corrode when exposed to atmosphere. Gold does not corrode because it is a highly unreactive metal which remains unaffected by air, water vapour and other gases in the atmosphere. Gold does not tarnish and retains its lustre (chamak) for years. Since gold does not corrode, therefore, gold ornaments look new even after several years of use. So we can say Gold is used to make jewellery because of its bright shiny surface and high resistance to corrosion. It is noted that gold ornaments loses its shine with time and become dull, then such gold ornaments are polished by jewellers to make them shine again. Apart from this, gold dissolves only in aqua-regia solution.
Platinum is another metal which is highly resistant to corrosion. Platinum also dissolves only in aqua-regia. Platinum is a white metal with a silvery shine. Thus, platinum is used to make jewellery because of its bright shiny surface and high resistance to corrosion.

EXAMPLE 11

Four metals P,Q,R and S are all obtained by the reduction of their oxides with carbon. Metal P is used to form a thin layer over the sheets of metal S to prevent its corrosion. Metal Q is used for electroplating tiffin boxes made of metal S whereas metal R is used in making car batteries. Metals Q and R form an alloy called solder. what are metals P,Q,R and S ? How have you arrived at this conclusion ?

1) Metal P is zinc
2) Metal Q is tin, metal R is lead
3) Metal S is iron metal P (zinc) is used to form a thin layer on metal S (iron) to prevent its corrosion.
4) Metal Q (tin) is used for electroplating tiffin boxes made of metal S (iron)
5) Metal R (lead) is used in making car batteries.
6) Metals Q (tin) and R (lead) form an alloy called solder.

Alloys

Metal ki kuch properties jaise malleability, ductility, strength, hardness, resistance to corrosion, appearance etc., ko improve karne ke liye hum ek metal ko dusre metal ke sath mix karte hai. Ab iss mixture of 2 or more metals ko hum alloy bolte hai. For example aluminium metal light hota hai lekin strong nahi hota, lekin jab hum aluminium ko copper, magnesium, aur manganese ke sath mix karte hai tab ye duralumin alloy form karta hai jo light aur strong dono hota hai. Iss wajah se duralumin alloy ko hum aircraft bodies, space satellite, pressure cookers making ke liye use karte hai. Similarly, aluminium metal light hota hai lekin hard nahi hota, lekin jab hum aluminium metal ko magnesium ke sath mix karte hai tab ye magnalium alloy form karta hai jo light aur hard dono hota hai. Iss wajah se magnalium alloy ko hum balance beam aur light instruments making ke liye use karte hai. Now iron metal ko hum pure form meh use nahi karte, kyunki pure iron bahut soft hota hai aur jab ye hot hota hai tab hum isse easily stretch kar sakte hai. Lekin jab hum isko carbon element ke sath mix karte hai, tab ye steel alloy form karta hai, jo strong aur hard dono hota hai. Steel ki strength aur other properties carbon content par depend karti hai. Ab kyunki steel alloy hard, tough aur strong hota hai iss wajah se isko hum screws, bridges, railway lines etc., making ke liye use karte hai. Moreover, jab hum iron metal ko chromium aur nickel metal ke sath mix karte hai tab ye stainless steel alloy form karta hai, jo strong, tough hota hai aur ye rusting bhi show nahi karta. Stainless steel ko hum cooking utensils, scissors, ornamental pieces etc., making ke liye use karte hai.

Therefore, alloy ek homogenous mixture hota hai jo 2 or more metals se milkar form hota hai. For example brass alloy - copper aur zinc metal se form hota hai, whereas steel alloy iron aur carbon se form hota hai. Alloy ki preparation ke liye hum metals ki required proportion ko molten state meh mix karte hai, then isko room temperature par cool karte hai.

ocr_image
Figure : To make an alloy, the molten metal are mixed and then allowed to cool


Alloy ki properties constituent metals se different hoti hai.
1) Alloy constituent metal se stronger hota hai.
2) Alloy constituent metal se harder hota hai.
3) Alloy corrosion ke towards jyada resistance show karta hai.
4) Alloy ka melting point constituent metal se lower hota hai.
5) Alloy ki electrical conductivity pure metal se lower hoti hai.
ocr_image
Figure : Some of the uses of the metal alloys


Ab hum kuch alloys ko yahan discuss karenge
(i) Brass : Brass alloy copper (80 %) aur zinc (20 %) se form hota hai. Brass alloy pure copper metal ki respect meh jyada malleable aur strong hota hai. Brass ko hum cooking utensils, screws, nuts, bolts, wires, tunes etc., making ke liye use karte hai.
(ii) Bronze : Bronze alloy copper (90 %) aur tin (10%) se form hota hai. Bronze alloy tough aur corrosion ke towards highly resistant hota hai. Bronze ko hum statues, coins, medals, cooking utensils etc., making ke liye use karte hai.
Alloy ki electrical conductivity pure metals se kam hoti hai. For example brass aur bronze alloys electricity ke good conductors nahi hote lekin pure copper metal excellent conductor of electricity hota hai aur isse hum electric circuits making ke liye use karte hai.
(iii) Solder : Solder alloy lead (50 %) aur tin (50 %) se form hota hai. Iss alloy ka melting point pure metal se kam hota hai. Jis wajah se iss alloy ko hum electrical wires ki welding ke liye use karte hai.
(iv) Amalgam : Jab mercury metal ko hum dusre metals ke sath mix karte hai tab ye amalgam form karta hai. Jaise solution of sodium metal in liquid mercury metal ko hum sodium amalgam bolte hai. Mercury, silver, tin, aur zinc ke amalgam ko dentists teeth filling ke liye use karte hai.
(v) Alloys of Gold : Gold ki purity ko hum carats meh consider karte hai. Pure gold ko hum 24 carats bolte hai. Pure gold soft hota hai jis wajah se isko hum jewellery making ke liye use nahi karte. So gold ko hum silver or copper ke sath mix karte hai tab ye hard hota hai jisko hum jewellery making ke liye use karte hai. India meh generally 22 carat gold hi use hota hai jo gold aur copper or silver ka alloy hota hai.

Alloys

The various properties of a metal like malleability, ductility, strength, hardness, resistance to corrosion, appearance, etc., can be improved by mixing other metals with it. This mixture of two or more metals is called an alloy. For example, aluminium metal is light but not strong, but an alloy of aluminium with copper, magnesium and manganese (called duralumin) is light as well as strong. Since duralumin is light and yet strong, it is used for making the aircraft bodies and parts, space satellites, and kitchen-ware like pressure cookers, etc. Similarly, aluminium metal is light but not hard, but an alloy of aluminium with magnesium (called magnalium) is light as well as hard. Since magnalium alloy is light and yet very hard, it is used to make balance beams and light instruments. Iron is never used in the pure form. This is because pure iron is very soft and stretches easily when hot. But when a small amount of carbon is mixed with iron, we get an alloy called steel. This alloy of iron called steel is hard and strong. The strength and other properties of steel vary with the percentage of carbon present in it. Being very hard, tough and strong, steel is used for making nails, screws, girders, bridges and railway lines, etc. Also, when iron metal is alloyed with other metals such as chromium and nickel, we get an alloy called stainless steel which is strong, tough and does not rust at all. It is used for making cooking utensils, knives, scissors, tools and ornamental pieces.

Therefore, an alloy is a homogeneous mixture of two or more metals (or a metal and small amounts of non-metals). For example, brass is an alloy of two metals : copper and zinc, whereas steel is an alloy of a metal and a small amount of a non-metal : iron and carbon. An alloy is prepared by mixing the various metals in molten state in required proportions, and then cooling their mixture to the room temperature.

ocr_image
Figure : To make an alloy, the molten metal are mixed and then allowed to cool


The properties of an alloy are different from the properties of the constituent metals (from which it is made).
1) Alloys are stronger than the metals from which they are made.
2) Alloys are harder than the constituent metals.
3) Alloys are more resistant to corrosion.
4) Alloys have lower melting points than the constituent metals.
5) Alloys have lower electrical conductivity than pure metals.
ocr_image
Figure : Some of the uses of the metal alloys


Now we discuss common alloys as follows :
(i) Brass : Brass is an alloy of copper (80 %) and zinc (20 %). Brass is more malleable and more strong than pure copper. Brass is used for making cooking utensils, screws, nuts, bolts, wires etc.,
(ii) Bronze : Bronze is an alloy of copper (90 %) and tin (10%). Bronze is very tough and highly resistant to corrosion. It is used for making statues, coins, medals, cooking utensils etc.,
The electrical conductivity of an alloy is less than that of pure metals. For example brass and bronze are not good conductors of electricity but pure copper metal is an excellent conductor of electricity and used for making electrical circuits.
(iii) Solder : Solder is an alloy of lead (50 %) and tin (50 %). The melting point of an alloy is less than that of pure metals. So, it is used for soldering (or welding) electrical wires together.
(iv) Amalgam : An alloy of mercury metal with one or more other metals is known as an amalgam. A solution of sodium metal in liquid mercury metal is called sodium amalgam. An amalgam consisting of mercury, silver, tin and zinc is used by dentists for fillings in teeth.
(v) Alloys of Gold : The purity of gold is expressed in terms of 'carats'. Pure gold is said to be of 24 carats. Pure gold (known as 24 carat gold) is very soft due to which it is not suitable for making jewellery. Gold is alloyed with a small amount of silver or copper to make it hard. In India, gold ornaments are usually made of 22 carat gold which is an alloy of gold and copper or silver.

EXAMPLE 12

Alloys are used in electrically heating devices rather that pure metals. Give one reason.

Alloys are used in electrical heating devices rather than pure metals because the resistivity of an alloy is more than the resistivity of a pure metal. Moreover alloy does not burn (or oxidize) easily even at higher temperature.

EXAMPLE 13

Name an alloy of
(i) Aluminium used in construction of air crafts.
(ii) Lead in joining metals for electric welding.
(iii) Copper used in household vessels.

(i) The alloy is duralumin : Al(95%),Cu(4%),Mg(0.5%),Mn(0.5%).
(ii) The alloy is solder : Pb(50%),Sn(50%)
(iii) The alloy is brass : Cu(80%),Zn(20%).

SUMMARY

1) Elements can be classified as metals and non-metals.
2) Metals are lustrous, malleable, ductile and are good conductors of heat and electricity. They are solids at room temperature, except mercury which is a liquid.
3) Metals can form positive ions by losing electrons to non-metals.
4) Metals combine with oxygen to form basic oxides. Aluminium oxide and zinc oxide show the properties of both basic as well as acidic oxides. These oxides are known as amphoteric oxides.
5) Different metals have different reactivities with water and dilute acids.
6) A list of common metals arranged in order of their decreasing reactivity is known as an activity series.
7) Metals above hydrogen in the Activity series can displace hydrogen from dilute acids.
8) A more reactive metal displaces a less reactive metal from its salt solution.
9) Metals occur in nature as free elements or in the form of their compounds.
10) The extraction of metals from their ores and then refining them for use is known as metallurgy.
11) An alloy is a homogeneous mixture of two or more metals, or a metal and a non-metal.
12) The surface of some metals, such as iron, is corroded when they are exposed to moist air for a long period of time. This phenomenon is known as corrosion.
13) Non-metals have properties opposite to that of metals. They are neither malleable nor ductile. They are bad conductors of heat and electricity, except for graphite, which conducts electricity.
14) Non-metals form negatively charged ions by gaining electrons when reacting with metals.
15) Non-metals form oxides which are either acidic or neutral.
16) Non-metals do not displace hydrogen from dilute acids. They react with hydrogen to form hydrides.