Class 10
MATHS
Probability

What is probability?

check-circle

Answer

Step by step solution by experts to help you in doubt clearance & scoring excellent marks in exams.

Updated On: 25-5-2020

Apne doubts clear karein ab Whatsapp par bhi. Try it now.
CLICK HERE

Loading DoubtNut Solution for you

Watch 1000+ concepts & tricky questions explained!

199.9 K+

10.0 K+

Related Videos

play
1339036

10.0 K+

199.9 K+

4:06
play
1339898

43.4 K+

84.1 K+

8:15
play
1413399

18.2 K+

133.1 K+

2:19
play
53084365

12.7 K+

255.8 K+

1:53
play
96594860

1.8 K+

36.7 K+

2:28
play
61726549

8.6 K+

174.9 K+

1:05
play
76655

7.9 K+

159.7 K+

0:55
play
258671

17.6 K+

356.1 K+

1:20
play
1413377

353.4 K+

356.9 K+

2:19
play
1109

14.0 K+

280.7 K+

1:22
play
32535669

2.7 K+

54.6 K+

2:06
play
53090593

5.2 K+

105.2 K+

1:23
play
53090645

3.1 K+

62.5 K+

1:22
play
1415882

43.7 K+

43.9 K+

2:45
play
169552

4.0 K+

81.2 K+

0:52

Very Important Questions

Class 10th

PROBABILITY

10.7 K+ Views

Class 10th

PROBABILITY

8.5 K+ Views

Class 10th

PROBABILITY

6.8 K+ Views

Class 10th

PROBABILITY

5.0 K+ Views

Class 10th

PROBABILITY

4.4 K+ Views

Class 10th

PROBABILITY

4.4 K+ Views

Class 10th

PROBABILITY

4.3 K+ Views

Class 10th

PROBABILITY

4.2 K+ Views

Class 10th

PROBABILITY

4.1 K+ Views

Class 10th

PROBABILITY

4.0 K+ Views

Trending Question Answers

check-circle

Text Solution

Solution :
<h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#2f5496"><strong>What is probability? </strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Probability in mathematics is the measure of the uncertainty of the happening of an event with the use of the numbers. The possibility that an occasion will or will not happen is expressed on a scale running from 0 to 1. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">It can also be represented as a rate, where 0% denotes an impossible occasion, and 100 % implies a specific event. In this article, we will learn some basic probability theoretical aspects and solved examples for a clear understanding of the concept. </span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#2f5496"><strong>Definition of Probability</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Probability is the opportunity or the likelihood that an event will happen, which means the proportion of the quantity of positive cases to the complete number of possible cases, given that all cases are similarly likely, as already stated above that the probability always lies between the range of 0 and 1.</span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#2f5496"><strong>What is an event and outcome? </strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">An Event is a set of outcomes. For instance, when we throw a dice, the likelihood of getting a number less than five is an outcome. &nbsp;An Event can have a single outcome. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">An Outcome is a particular result of a random event. For instance, when we roll a dice, a getting four is an outcome. </span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#2f5496"><strong>Experimental Probability</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">It can be applied to any event linked with an experiment that is repeated several times. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">A trial is a point at which the analysis is performed once. It is also known as empirical probability. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Empirical probability: P(E) = total number of trials where event occurred /Overall number of Trials.</span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#2f5496"><strong>Theoretical Probability</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Theoretical Probability, P(E) = Number of Favorable Outcomes/Total number of possible outcomes&nbsp; </span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#2f5496"><strong>Elementary Event</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">An event with&nbsp;one outcome&nbsp;of the experiment is known as an&nbsp;elementary event.<br /> To understand it better, consider an example of tossing a coin &lsquo;n&rsquo; number of times. Here, each trial of this experiment will have two possible outcomes that are Heads(H) or Tails(T). Therefore, we can say that for a single toss, it has only one outcome, which is Heads or Tails.</span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#2f5496"><strong>Sum of Probabilities</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">The total sum of the probabilities of all the elementary events of an experiment is one. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Consider the coin-tossing test. P(Heads) + P(Tails ) </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">= (1/2)+ (1/2) =<strong>1 </strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Related Videos:</strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/types-of-experiment-1339037" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Types of Experiment</a></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/theoritical-approach-of-probability-1340650" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Theoritical Approach of Probability</a></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/elementary-event-1339038" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Elementary Event</a></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/compond-event-1340651" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Compond Event</a></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/sample-space-1340652" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Sample space</a></span></span></span></li> </ul> <h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#2f5496"><strong>Solved Examples</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Example 1: Find the probability of getting at least one 3 in 2 throws of a dice?</strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Solution </strong>: Total possible outcomes = 36. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Favaourable cases = 11 for example (3, 1) (3, 2) (3, 3) (3, 4) (3, 5) (3, 6). (1, 3) (2, 3) (4, 3) ,(5, 3) ,(6, 3) </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">In this way, Required probability= 11/36 </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Example 2: The probabilitA&rsquo;sf A&#39;s victory a round of chess against B is 2/3. Find the probability that A will succeed at least 1 of a sum of two games? </strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Solution:</strong> Required Probability = 1 &ndash; (A not winning even one Match out of 3) </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">A not winning even one Match out of 3 = 1-2/3 =1/3</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Thus, Required probability= 1 - (1/3)<sup> 2</sup> = 1 - (1/9) = (8/9) </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Example 3:</strong> <strong>What is the probability that an ordinary year will have 53 Mondays?</strong> </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Solution:</strong> Ordinary Year = 52 Weeks and one day. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Probability of one days, Day being Monday = 1/7 </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Along these lines, Required &nbsp;Probability = 1/7</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Example 4: If the probability of A passing the examination is 1/2 and the probability of B passing the examination is 1/3. Find the probability that both A and B will pass the examination?</strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Solution:</strong> Probability that A will pass in test = 1/2 </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">So, Probability that A will not pass in test = 1/2. (since Maximum Probability =1)</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Probability that B will pass in test = 1/3 </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">So, Probability that B will not pass in test = 2/3. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Probability that both will pass in the test = Probability that A will pass and Probability that B will pass </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">= 1/2 x 1/3 = 1/6</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Example 5: If the probability of A passing the examination is 1/2 and the probability of B passing the examination is 1/3. Find the probability that only 1 person, A or B, will pass the examination?</strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Solution: </strong><br /> Probability when only one person will pass A or B = (1/2) x (2/3) + (1/2) x (1/3) = 1/2</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Example 6: If the probability of A passing the examination is 1/2 and the probability of B passing the examination is 1/3. Find the probability that at least one person will pass the examination?</strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Solution:</strong><strong> </strong>Probability when at least one person, will pass, so the favourable outcomes can be &nbsp;(Both A and B pass), &nbsp;or (A fails and B pass). Or (A pass and B fails)</span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">= (1/2) x (1/3) + (1/2) x (1/3) + (1/2) x (2/3) &nbsp;= 1/6 + 1/6 + 1/3 = 2/3</span></span></span></li> </ul> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Example 7: Three playing cards are picked randomly together from a pack of 52 cards. Find the probability that all the picked cards are Hearts?</strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Solution:</strong><br /> There are 13 cards of Hearts. Three diamonds out of 13 Hearts can be taken out in&nbsp;<sup>13</sup>C<sub>3&nbsp;</sub>ways.<br /> Total number of sample spaces =&nbsp;<sup>52</sup>C<sub>3</sub><br /> Required probability =&nbsp;<sup>13</sup>C<sub>3&nbsp;</sub>/&nbsp;<sup>52</sup>C<sub>3</sub></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Example 8: A bag contains 8 red balls and 6 green balls. Three balls are chosen one by one with replacement. Find the probability that all the 3 balls are green?</strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Sol </strong>: Probability of green ball in the first attempt = 6 / 14 = 3 / 7<br /> Noe the probability will stay the same for the next two attempts.<br /> Hence, the required probability = (3/7) x (3/7) x (3/7) = 27 / 343</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Example 9: One bag contains 8 yellow balls and 6 black balls; another bag contains 7 yellow balls and 5 blue balls. If one ball is chosen from each bag, then what is the probability that both are yellow?</strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Sol : </strong></span></span></span></p> <table border="1" cellspacing="0" class="Table" style="border-collapse:collapse; border:1pt solid windowtext; width:100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="height:14.8pt; width:49.98%"> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Bag I</span></span></span></p> </td> <td style="height:14.8pt; width:50.02%"> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Bag II</span></span></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="height:14.8pt; width:49.98%"> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">8 yellow</span></span></span></p> </td> <td style="height:14.8pt; width:50.02%"> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">7 yellow</span></span></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="height:14.8pt; width:49.98%"> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">6 black</span></span></span></p> </td> <td style="height:14.8pt; width:50.02%"> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">5 blue</span></span></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Probability of getting a yellow ball from bag I = 8 / 14<br /> Probability of getting a yellow ball from bag II = 7 / 12<br /> Therefore, required Proability = (8/14) x (7/12) = (1/3)</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Important Chapters:</strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/ncert-solutions" style="box-sizing:border-box; color:blue; text-decoration:underline">NCERT Solution for Maths</a></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/ncert-solutions/class-9-maths-chapter-15-probability-1" style="box-sizing:border-box; color:blue; text-decoration:underline">NCERT Solution for Maths Class 9 Chapter Probability</a></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/ncert-solutions/class-10-maths-chapter-15-probability-1" style="box-sizing:border-box; color:blue; text-decoration:underline">NCERT Solution for Maths Class 10 Chapter Probability</a></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/ncert-solutions/class-11-maths-chapter-16-probability-1" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">NCERT Solution for Maths Class 11 Chapter Probability</a></span></span></span></li> </ul>

check-circle

Image Solution

Find answer in image to clear your doubt instantly:

Trending Chapters

Quadratic Equation||Degree of Quadratic Equation||Formation of Quadratic Equation | Introductions || Represent Language Problems Algebraically And Geometrically || Graphical Method Of Solution Of A Pair Of Linear Equations || Examples | Introduction || Important terms related to arithmetic progression || formation of A.P. || Examples | Introduction | Similar Figures | Similar Triangle And Congruent Triangle | Similarity Of Triangles | Theorem 6.1 | Introduction | Distance Formula | Examples | Introduction | Surface Area Of Combination Of Solids | Example | Perimeter and Area of a Circle | Examples | Relationship between Zeroes and Coefficients of a Polynomial || Examples | Mean Of Grouped Data | Introduction | Tangent to a Circle | Theorem 10.1 | Examples

By using this site you agree to the use of cookies. Check our Cookie Policy for more details