Class 9
MATHS
Introduction To Euclids Geometry

What is Geometry ?

check-circle

Answer

Step by step solution by experts to help you in doubt clearance & scoring excellent marks in exams.

Updated On: 26-6-2020

Apne doubts clear karein ab Whatsapp par bhi. Try it now.
CLICK HERE

Loading DoubtNut Solution for you

Watch 1000+ concepts & tricky questions explained!

192.6 K+

9.6 K+

check-circle

Text Solution

Solution :
<h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Introduction To Euclids Geometry</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">In this chapter, we will study about geometry definition, geometry formula and so on.&nbsp; We will also have a look at some of the examples to get a good idea about it so that it does not confuse you in the exams. This would help you to get a good and clear idea about it. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="color:#000000">When it comes to Euclidean geometry, it refers to the study of geometry where it mainly focuses on the geometrical figures. It was the Alexandrian mathematician Euclid who introduced &lsquo;Elements&rsquo; in his book on geometry. So, this is known as Euclid geometry. It should be noted that Euclid has stated 5 main axioms or postulates. &nbsp;In regard to the the example of the extensive use of geometrical techniques, we can refer to the flawless construction of</span> <a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/pyramid-1528107" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Pyramids</a> <span style="color:#000000">which were built by the Egyptians. So, let us understand more about Euclidean Geometry to get the right knowledge about it.</span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>What is Euclidean Geometry?</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="color:#000000">The Euclidean Geometry, which is known as the plane geometry, is considered as an axiomatic system. It is from the small number of simple axioms that the theorems have been derived. Both Euclidean and Non-Euclidean geometry are different. For the given line and point in Euclid Geometry, there is a single line that passes through the given points in the same plane where it never intersects.</span> </span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>What are Euclid&rsquo;s Elements?</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">A total number of 13 books were written by Euclid, the ancient Greek mathematician in Alexandria, which is known as Euclids Elements. This popularized geometry all over the world. When it comes to these elements, it is a collection of propositions, definitions, postulates including the mathematical proofs of the propositions. Plane geometry has been discussed in Book 1 to 4<sup>th</sup> and 6<sup>th</sup>. Five postulates for plane geometry were given by him which is termed as Euclid&rsquo;s Postulates. A common source for learning geometry was possible because of his works.</span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Euclidean Geometry Axioms</strong></span></span></span></h2> <ol> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">If things are equal to the same thing, then things are equal to one another.</span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">If equals are added to equals, then the wholes are equal.</span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">If equals are subtracted from equals, then the remainders are equal.</span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">If things coincide with one another, then things are equal to one another.</span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">The whole will always be greater than the part.</span></span></span></li> </ol> <h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Euclid&rsquo;s Five Postulates</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">We discuss a few terms before discussing Euclid&rsquo;s Postulates as listed by Euclid in his book 1 of the &lsquo;Elements&rsquo;. Let us have a look at the postulated statements. </span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">In each of the three steps from solids to points as solids-surface-lines-points, one dimension is lost.</span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">There are 3 dimensions in a solid, 2 in the surface including 1 in the line and point is dimensionless.</span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">A point is anything that has got no part, a breadthless length is a line and the ends of a line point.</span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">A surface is something that has got length and breadth only.</span></span></span></li> </ul> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Related Videos:</strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:blue"><u><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/axioms-and-theorem-1338460" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Axioms and Theorem</a></u></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/incidence-axioms-1338465" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Incidence Axioms</a></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/collinear-points-1338466" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Collinear Points</a></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/concurrent-lines-1338467" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Concurrent Lines</a></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/two-distinct-lines-cannot-have-more-than-1-point-in-common-1338468" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Two Distinct lines cannot have more than 1 point in common</a></span></span></span></li> </ul> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Now, we will discuss the postulates in details</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Euclid&rsquo;s Postulate 1</strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">According to Euclid&rsquo;s Postulate 1, it states that a straight line can be drawn from anyone point to another point. It means that through two distinct points, at least one straight line passes through it. But at the same, it was not mentioned that there cannot be more than one such line. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Euclid&rsquo;s Postulate 2</strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Euclid&rsquo;s Postulate 2 states that a terminated line can be indefinitely produced further. It means that a line segment or terminated line can be extended in either direction to form a line.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Euclid&rsquo;s Postulate 3</strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000">According to Euclid&rsquo;s Postulate 3, by taking a radius and center, a</span> <a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/what-is-circle--1338625" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">circle</a> <span style="color:#000000">can be drawn. This is possible by taking the start or endpoint of a circle along with the</span> <a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/diameter-1338634" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">diameter</a> <span style="color:#000000">of the circle, which will be the length of the line segment.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Euclid&rsquo;s Postulate 4</strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Euclid&rsquo;s Postulate 4 states that all the right angles are always found to be equal to one another. This is possible irrespective of the length of their orientations of the sides.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Euclid&rsquo;s Postulate 5</strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">According to Euclid&rsquo;s Postulate 5, if two interior angles are forms by a straight line falling on two other straight lines on the same side then the two right angles which have been produced indefinitely, would meet on the side where the sum of the angles is found to be less than two right angles.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Now, we will concentrate on some examples in which we will find out as to how to come up with the right solution.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-size:16px"><strong>Question: </strong></span><span style="font-size:10.0pt"><span style="font-size:16px">Look at the figure below. Here, if AC = BD, then prove that AB = CD.</span><br /> &nbsp;<img alt="" src="https://d10lpgp6xz60nq.cloudfront.net/engagement_framework/C0D984E1-C4D6-B081-65B2-883167D75286.webp" style="height:50px; width:280px" /></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Solution:</strong> Here,<br /> Given: AC = BD<br /> So AB + BC = BC + CD<br /> Now, if we subtract BC from both sides, we get<br /> AB + BC &ndash; BC = BC + CD &ndash; BC<br /> [When equals are subtracted from equals, then the remainders are always found to be equal]<br /> So, here, we get AB = CD which has been proved.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Question: </strong>The point C lies between two points A and B in such a way that AC = BC, then can you prove that AC = &frac12; AB? Do explain by drawing the figure.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Solution: </strong>Here, we have<br /> <img alt="" src="https://d10lpgp6xz60nq.cloudfront.net/engagement_framework/8378E3B6-1153-1FBB-4C35-637A83835E30.webp" style="height:50px; width:280px" /></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">AC = BC [Given]</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">So, AC + AC = BC + AC</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">[If equals added to equals then wholes are equal]<br /> or 2AC = AB [∵ AC + BC = AB]</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">or AC = &frac12; AB.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Hence proved.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Question: </strong>The point C is called a mid-point of line segment AB. Can you prove that every line segment has one and only one mid-point.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Solution: </strong>We, will concentrate on the line AB with mid points &lsquo;C&rsquo; and &lsquo;D&rsquo;.<br /> <img alt="" src="https://d10lpgp6xz60nq.cloudfront.net/engagement_framework/2E766D0A-380A-94C4-1B6C-B858AE802C0D.webp" style="height:50px; width:278px" /></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">We get AC = &frac12; AB &hellip;&hellip;(i)<br /> and AD = &frac12; AB &hellip;&hellip;(ii)</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Now we subtract (i) from (ii), where we get:</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">AD &ndash; AC = &frac12; AB &ndash; &frac12; AB</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">or AD &ndash; AC = 0 or CD = 0</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Therefore C and D coincide.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">So, it can be proved that every line segment has one and only one mid-point.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Important Chapters:</strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:black"><span style="color:blue"><u><a href="https://doubtnut.com/ncert-solutions" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">NCERT&nbsp;Solutions for&nbsp;Maths</a></u></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/ncert-solutions/class-9-maths-chapter-5-introduction-to-euclids-geometry-1" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">NCERT Solution for Class 9 Maths Chapter Introduction To Euclids Geometry</a></span></span></span></li> </ul>

check-circle

Image Solution

Find answer in image to clear your doubt instantly:

Related Videos

play
1339046

10.4 K+

208.8 K+

2:43
play
1338557

48.2 K+

156.4 K+

4:02
play
20756050

2.2 K+

44.1 K+

0:37

By using this site you agree to the use of cookies. Check our Cookie Policy for more details