Home

>

English

>

Class 10

>

Maths

>

Chapter

>

Probability

>

Theoritical Approach of Probab...

Theoritical Approach of Probability

check-circle

Answer

Step by step solution by experts to help you in doubt clearance & scoring excellent marks in exams.

Updated On: 13-8-2020

Apne doubts clear karein ab Whatsapp par bhi. Try it now.
CLICK HERE

Loading DoubtNut Solution for you

Watch 1000+ concepts & tricky questions explained!

73.8 K+

3.7 K+

check-circle

Text Solution

Solution :
<h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong><strong>Theoretical Probability</strong></strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="color:#000000">We use</span><span style="color:#0e101a"> </span><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/what-is-probability-1339036" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">probability</a><span style="color:#0e101a"> </span><span style="color:#000000">to explain uncertain events. Suppose you accidentally drop a slice of bread; then you don&rsquo;t know whether it is going to fall with the buttered side facing upward or downwards. When your favourite sports team plays a match, you don&rsquo;t know whether they will win or not. When the weather reporter says there is a 30% chance of rain, you might or might not end up getting rain.&nbsp;</span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong><strong>Probability Definition&nbsp;</strong></strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">It is defined as a mathematical approach to determining how likely an event is to occur. The probability of an event occurring is defined as the ratio of favourable outcomes to the number of total possible outcomes in a given event. The probability magnitude is measured between the range of numbers from 0 to 1. The three rules utilized in probability calculations are addition, multiplication, and complement rules.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000">Experiment -An</span><span style="color:#0e101a"> </span><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/what-is-probability-experiments--1339885" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">experiment</a><span style="color:#0e101a"> </span><span style="color:#000000">refers to an uncertain process.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000">Outcome<strong> - </strong>An outcome is a single result of that experiment.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/sample-space-1340652" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Sample space</a><strong><span style="color:#0e101a"> </span><span style="color:#000000">- </span></strong><span style="color:#000000">It is the set of all possible outcomes of that experiment.&nbsp;</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">Event<strong> -&nbsp; </strong>It is the number of favourable outcomes of an experiment.&nbsp;</span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong><strong>Theoretical Probability Vs Experimental Probability</strong></strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Probability can be studied using two different methods, and they are:</span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Theoretical Probability</span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Experimental Probability</span></span></span></li> </ul> <h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong><strong>What is</strong>&nbsp;<strong>Theoretical Probability?</strong></strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">In the theoretical probability, an experiment is not conducted for the determination of the probability. Instead, you use what you know more about the situation to find out the probability of an event occurring. You may use your reasoning abilities or an existing formula to reach your answer.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">The theoretical probability of an event occurring is an &ldquo;expected&rdquo; probability based upon information about the situation. The theoretical probability is the ratio of the number of favourable outcomes to the number of possible outcomes.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><strong>Probability of Event P(E) = Number of Favourable outcomes / Number of Possible outcomes.</strong></span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong><strong>Example of Theoretical Probability</strong></strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Calculate the probability of rolling a 4 on a fair dice.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Solution</strong>: Here, we do not require an experiment to be conducted for determining the required probability. But we know that there are 6 possible outcomes when rolling a dice: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">The only favourable outcome is getting a 4.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">The required probability ist that under the optimum circumstances, we would expect to roll one 4 out of every 6 rolls.</span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong><strong>What is Experimental Probability?</strong></strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000">The experimental probability is also referred to as</span><span style="color:#0e101a"> </span><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/empirical-probability-definition-1338820" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">empirical probability</a><span style="color:#0e101a">, </span><span style="color:#000000">is a methodology that relies upon real experiments and satisfactory recordings of an event of specific events. In contrast, the theoretical probability attempts to foresee what will happen based upon the total number of possible outcomes. The experimental probability is characterized as the proportion of the times that event occurs to the complete number of trials.&nbsp;</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Probability of Event P(E) = number of times that event occurs/Total number of trials&nbsp;</strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">The basic contrast between these two approaches is that in the experimental methodology, the probability of an event is based on what has occurred by leading a series of real experiments. Whereas in the case of the theoretical probability, we endeavour to foresee what will happen without really performing the experiments. Experimental probability approaches theoretical probability when the number of trials is extremely large.</span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong><strong>Why not simply Conduct Experiments all the time?</strong></strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">There are several reasons why the field of Theoretical Probability exists. From time to time, experimenting isn&rsquo;t possible for financial or practical reasons. As an instance, you might be studying a rare hereditary trait in salamanders, and you also want to know what the likelihood of anyone salamander with the rare trait is. If you don&rsquo;t have access to each of the salamanders on the planet, you won&rsquo;t have the ability to experiment so you&rsquo;ll have to rely on theory for the answer. Theoretical probability can be used in many regions of science where direct experimentation isn&rsquo;t possible&mdash;for example, probabilities between subatomic particles or abstract structures like vector distances.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Related Videos:</strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/types-of-experiment-1339037" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Types of Experiment</a></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/compond-event-1340651" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Compond Event</a></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/occurrence-of-an-event-1340653" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Occurrence of an event</a></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/favorable-elementary-events-1340654" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Favorable elementary events</a></span></span></li> </ul> <h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Solved Examples Theoretical Probability </strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Example 1:</strong> Find the theoretical probability of each of the events in the first two of our three experiments?</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Solution: </strong>Write down the value of&nbsp;sample space n(S)</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Experiment 1 (coin):&nbsp;n(S)=2</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Experiment 2 (dice):&nbsp;n(S)=36</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Now, the size of the event set will be.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Experiment 1:&nbsp;n(E)=1</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Experiment 2:&nbsp;n(E)=5</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Now, we will find the theoretical probability</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Experiment 1:</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">P(E)=n(E)/n(S)=1/2=0.5</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Experiment 2:</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">P(E)=n(E)/n(S)=5/36=0.138</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Example 2: A playing card is selected randomly from a deck of 52&nbsp;cards. Find the probability that it is &lsquo;4&rsquo;&nbsp;of diamonds</strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Solution:</strong> The size of the event = n(E)=1</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Sample Space = n(S)= 52</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Theoretical probability= P(E) = size of event / sample space</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">P(E) = n(E)/n(S) =1/52</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Therefore, the required probability is 1/52</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Example 3: A playing card is selected randomly from a deck of 52&nbsp;cards. Find the probability that it is a face card.</strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Solution:</strong> In total, there are 12 face cards in a pack of 52 cards. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">The size of event (favourable outcomes)= n(E)=12</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Sample Space (total no. of outcomes) = n(S)= 52</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Theoretical probability= P(E) = size of event / sample space</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">P(E) = n(E)/n(S) =12/52 = 3/13</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Therefore, the required probability is 3/13</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Example 4: What is the probability of rolling a dice and having it come up a three or a four?</strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Solution:</strong> First, let us find the total number of outcomes</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Sample space : 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Total outcomes= n(S)= 6</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Next, find the number of favourable outcomes (event).</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Favourable outcomes:</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Getting a&nbsp;3&nbsp;or a&nbsp;4 = n(E) = 2&nbsp;favourable outcomes</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Then, now let us compute the ratio of favourable outcomes to total outcomes.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">P(event) =No. of&nbsp;favourable outcomes/total&nbsp;no. of outcomes</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">P(E) = n(E)/n(S)</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">P(3&nbsp;or&nbsp;4)= 2/6 = 1/3</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Thus, the required theoretical probability of rolling a 3 or a 4 on a dice is 1/3.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Example 5: Find the probability of rolling a dice and getting an even number?</strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Solution:</strong> First, let us find the total number of outcomes</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Sample space : 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Total outcomes= n(S)= 6</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Next, we will find the number of favourable outcomes (event).</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Favourable outcomes:</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Getting an even number 2,4, 6 = n(E)= 3&nbsp;favourable outcomes</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Then, now let us compute the ratio of favourable outcomes to total outcomes.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">P(event) =No. of&nbsp;favourable outcomes/total&nbsp;no. of outcomes</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">P(E) = n(E)/n(S)</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">P (even number ) = 3/6 = 1/2</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Thus, the required theoretical probability of rolling an even number on dice is 1/2.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Example 6: What is the probability of tossing a number cube and having it come up less than 5?</strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Solution:</strong> First, let us find the total number of outcomes</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Sample space : 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Total outcomes= n(S)= 6</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Next, we will find the number of favourable outcomes (event).</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Favourable outcomes:</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">A number less than 5 (1,2,3,4) = n(E)= 4&nbsp;favorable outcomes</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Then, now let us compute the ratio of favourable outcomes to total outcomes.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">P(event) =No. of&nbsp;favourable outcomes/total&nbsp;no. of outcomes</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">P(E) = n(E)/n(S)</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">P (1,2,3,4 ) = 4/6 = 2/3</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Thus, the required theoretical probability of rolling an even number on dice is 2/3.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Important Chapters:</strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/ncert-solutions" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">NCERT Solution for Maths</a></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/ncert-solutions/class-9-maths-chapter-15-probability-1" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">NCERT Solution for Maths Class 9 Chapter Probability</a></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/ncert-solutions/class-10-maths-chapter-15-probability-1" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">NCERT Solution for Maths Class 10 Chapter Probability</a></span></span></span></li> </ul>

check-circle

Image Solution

Find answer in image to clear your doubt instantly:

Related Videos

play
1528647

15.0 K+

54.4 K+

1:01
play
91188410

200+

4.8 K+

2:58

Very Important Questions

Latest Questions

Class 10th

Probability

Class 10th

Probability

Class 10th

Probability

Class 10th

Probability

Class 10th

Probability

Class 10th

Probability

Class 10th

Probability

Class 10th

Probability

Class 10th

Probability

Class 10th

Probability

By using this site you agree to the use of cookies. Check our Cookie Policy for more details