Class 10
MATHS
Real Numbers

Euclid division algorithm

check-circle

Answer

Step by step solution by experts to help you in doubt clearance & scoring excellent marks in exams.

Updated On: 31-5-2020

Apne doubts clear karein ab Whatsapp par bhi. Try it now.
CLICK HERE

Loading DoubtNut Solution for you

Watch 1000+ concepts & tricky questions explained!

342.3 K+

17.0 K+

check-circle

Text Solution

Solution :
<h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Euclid Division Algorithm</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">In this chapter, we will discuss the Euclid division algorithm. We will also stress the idea of Euclid division algorithm formula. Further, we will study continued division along with Euclid division algorithm examples as well.</span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>What is an Algorithm?</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="color:#000000">When a procedure takes in input, and then a certain set of steps are followed and then produces an output, it is termed as an</span> <a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/what-is-an-algorithm-1409254" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">algorithm</a>. </span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>What is Euclid Division Algorithm?</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="color:#000000">When</span> <a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/euclid-division-lemma-1338825" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Euclid&#39;s division Lemma</a> <span style="color:#000000">is applied in the process and that too in succession several times in order to obtain the HCF of any two numbers is known as Euclid division algorithm. Well, if you really wish to understand it well, then we need to take an example to get a clear idea about it.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">Let us suppose that there are two numbers a and b. Here, we will have two integers q and r by applying Euclid&#39;s division algorithm. So, we get</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">a = b(q) + r</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="color:#000000">Here, we can find that r is the remainder while q is the</span> <a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/quotient-the-number-of-times-the-divisor-is-contained-in-the-dividend-is-called-quotient-1527493" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">quotient</a>. <span style="color:#000000">An important fact can be noticed with respect to this relation, which is any common factor of a and b should always be a</span> <a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/factor-1527370" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">factor</a> <span style="color:#000000">of r. Do, you know why? Let us assume that the common factor of both a and b is an integer k. Now, when we try to divide the above relation on both sides by k, we get:</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">&nbsp; a/k = b(q)/k + r/k</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">= a/k - b(q)/k = &nbsp;r/k </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">We find that the left side is an integer. This is because the common factor of both a and b is k. So, it means that the ride side must also be an integer. Here k must divide r.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">Now, we will take an example to have a more clear idea about it.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">Suppose we need have to find the HCF of 320 and 132. Here, we need to apply the&nbsp;<strong>Euclid&#39;s Division Lemma</strong><strong>&nbsp;</strong>&nbsp;on these two numbers:</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">320 = 132(2) + 56&nbsp;[step&minus;1]</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">Next we need to apply the division lemma on 132 and 56 where we get, </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">132 = 56(2) + 20&nbsp;[step&minus;2] </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">Now, we have to apply the division lemma to 56 and 20 where we get,</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">56 = 20(2) + 16 [step&minus;3]</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">Next, we will apply the&nbsp;division lemma&nbsp;to 20 and 16 where we get,</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">20 = 16(1) + 4&nbsp; [step&minus;4]</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">In the last step, we have:</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">16 = 4(4) + 0&nbsp;[step&minus;5]</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">We can find that there is no remainder left for which we will assume that HCF xx is equal to 4.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">So, here we get</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">&rArr; HCF(320,132) = 4</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">Now, in order to justify our assertion, we have to show that:</span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">4 happens to be a common factor of the original pair of numbers.</span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">4 is also the&nbsp;highest possible&nbsp;common factor.</span></span></span></li> </ul> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">When we back-trace from the second last step, we can find the common factor of the original pair of numbers is 4. So, by having a look at the second last step we find that the common factor of 16 and 20 is 4.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">The next thing that we need to do is to prove that no other&nbsp;higher&nbsp;common factor is possible.</span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">From Step-1, any common factor (say&nbsp;yy&nbsp;) of 320 and 132 must also be a factor of 56.</span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">From Step-2,&nbsp;yy&nbsp;must also be a factor of 20.</span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">From Step-3,&nbsp;yy&nbsp;must also be a factor of 16.</span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">Finally, from Step-4,&nbsp;yy&nbsp;must also be a factor of 4.</span></span></span></li> </ul> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="color:#000000">Thus, it can be seen that for any common factor of 320 and 132 must also be a factor of the common factor 4. So, this provides the accurate meaning that 4 is the highest possible common factor, i.e. the</span><span style="color:black">&nbsp;</span><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/highest-common-factors-hcf-the-highest-common-factor-hcf-of-two-or-more-numbers-of-the-greatest-or-t-5374907" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">HCF</a><span style="color:black">&nbsp;</span><span style="color:#000000">is 4.</span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Generalizing Euclid&#39;s Division Algorithm</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">Let us now try to generalize this discussion. Suppose that we have to find the HCF of any two arbitrary numbers&nbsp;aa&nbsp;and&nbsp;bb. We apply&nbsp;Euclid&rsquo;s Division Lemma&nbsp;in succession, until we obtain a remainder of 0:</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">a = b(q1) + r1b = r1(q2) + r2r1 = r2(q3) + r3⋮rn&minus;2 = rn &minus; 1(qn) + rnrn &minus; 1=rn(qn+1) +0a = b(q1) + r1b = r1(q2) + r2r1 = r2(q3) + r3⋮rn &ndash; 2 = rn&minus;1(qn) + rnrn &ndash; 1 = rn(qn+1) + 0</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">The HCF is the remainder in the second last step, that is:</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">&rArr;HCF(a,b) = rn</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><strong>Related Videos:</strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li style="text-align:justify"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/what-is-euclid-division--1338824" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">What is Euclid Division ?</a></span></span></span></li> <li style="text-align:justify"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/properties-of-divisibility-1340617" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Properties of Divisibility</a></span></span></span></li> <li style="text-align:justify"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/proof-of-euclid-division-lemma-1340618" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Proof of Euclid division lemma</a></span></span></span></li> <li style="text-align:justify"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/divisibility-1338823" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Divisibility</a></span></span></span></li> <li style="text-align:justify"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer/hcf-of-two-positive-integers-1338827" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">HCF of two positive integers</a></span></span></span></li> </ul> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">Now, the next step is to work on some euclid division algorithm examples that can help to get the perfect idea about it.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><strong><u>Solved Examples:</u></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><strong>Example 1.&nbsp;</strong>Can you find the&nbsp;HCF<strong>&nbsp;</strong>of 130 and 91 by using Euclid&#39;s Division Algorithm?</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><strong>Solution.&nbsp;</strong>We have:</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">130 = 91(1) + 3991 = 39(2) + 1339 = 13(3) + 0130 = 91(1) + 3991 = 39(2) + 1339 = 13(3) + 0</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">We are familiar that the HCF is the remainder in the second last step. Therefore,</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">&rArr;HCF (130, 91) = 13 </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><strong>Example 2.&nbsp;</strong>Can you find the&nbsp;HCF<strong>&nbsp;</strong>of 648 and 1400 by using Euclid&#39;s Division Algorithm?</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><strong>Solution.&nbsp;</strong>We have:</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">1400 = 648(2) + 104648 = 104 (6) + 24104 = 24(4) + 824 = 8(3) + 01400 = 648(2) + 104648 =104(6) + 24104 = 24(4) + 824 = 8(3) + 0</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">We are familiar that the HCF is the remainder in the second last step. Therefore,</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">&rArr;HCF(1400, 648) = 8.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><strong>Example 3:&nbsp;</strong>Suppose,<strong> </strong>xx&nbsp;and&nbsp;yy&nbsp;are integers. Can you express the HCF of 468 and 222 as&nbsp;468x + 222y468x + 222y?</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><strong>Solution:&nbsp;</strong>We need to first find the HCF of 468 and 222.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">According to Euclid&#39;s Division Algorithm, we have,</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">468 =222(2) + 24222 = 24(9) + 624 = 6(4) + 0468 = 222(2) + 24222 = 24(9) + 624 = 6(4) + 0</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">We are familiar that&nbsp;the&nbsp;HCF&nbsp;is the remainder in the second last step. Thus, we get,</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">&rArr;HCF(468,222) = 6</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">&rArr;HCF(468,222) = 6</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">Now, from the second step of&nbsp;Euclid&#39;s Division Algorithm, the equation to isolate 6 can be rearranged as below,</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">6 = 222 &minus; (24 &times; 9 )6 = 222 &minus; (24 &times; 9)</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">Also, from the first step of&nbsp;Euclid&#39;s Division Algorithm, we can get, &nbsp; 24 = 4 68 &minus; 222(2)24 = 468 &minus; 222(2),</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">Now, we will substitute this value of 24 in above equation where we get</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">6 = 222 &minus; [468 &minus; 222(2)](9) &rArr;6 = 222 + 222(18) &minus; 468(9) &rArr;6 = 468 (&minus;9) +222 (19)6=222&minus;[468 &minus; 222(2)](9)</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">&rArr;6= 222 + 222(18) &minus; 468(9)</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">&rArr;6= 468(&minus;9) + 222(19)</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">Thus,</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">&rArr;x = &minus;9 and y = 19.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><strong>Important Chapters:</strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/ncert-solutions" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">NCERT&nbsp;Solutions for&nbsp;Maths</a></span></span></span></li> <li style="text-align:justify"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/ncert-solutions/class-10-maths-chapter-1-real-numbers-1" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">NCERT Solution for Class 10 Maths Chapter Real Numbers</a></span></span></span></li> </ul>

check-circle

Image Solution

Find answer in image to clear your doubt instantly:

Related Videos

play
26861671

14.6 K+

294.8 K+

4:02
play
58114185

80.8 K+

102.1 K+

2:57
play
96580736

68.8 K+

1 M+

4:18
play
96580737

17.1 K+

342.1 K+

2:13
play
96580738

13.6 K+

273.6 K+

2:28
play
96580739

184.2 K+

411.5 K+

1:47
play
96580744

15.6 K+

312.3 K+

3:16
play
96580714

5.2 K+

104.6 K+

3:35
play
96580709

11.4 K+

228.0 K+

4:21
play
96580711

13.6 K+

271.8 K+

4:03
play
52808043

182.2 K+

2 M+

2:54
play
76133106

104.8 K+

138.5 K+

3:34
play
2970244

7.8 K+

157.3 K+

6:56
play
1338824

97.0 K+

312.9 K+

3:33
play
1338825

23.8 K+

477.2 K+

11:38

Very Important Questions

Latest Questions

Class 10th

Real Numbers

Class 10th

Real Numbers

Class 10th

Real Numbers

By using this site you agree to the use of cookies. Check our Cookie Policy for more details