logo
search
search
user
login
Login

Home

>

English

>

Class 12

>

Physics

>

Chapter

>

Nuclear Physics

>

Nuclear Fission...

Nuclear Fission

check-circle

Answer

Step by step solution by experts to help you in doubt clearance & scoring excellent marks in exams.

Updated On: 26-6-2020

Apne doubts clear karein ab Whatsapp par bhi. Try it now.
CLICK HERE

Loading DoubtNut Solution for you

Watch 1000+ concepts & tricky questions explained!

33.5 K+

1.7 K+

check-circle

Text Solution

Solution :
<h1><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:20px"><span style="color:#2980b9"><strong>Nuclear Fission</strong></span></span></span></h1> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Nuclear Fission is the procedure wherein the core of a particle breaks into littler cores. These littler cores are named as splitting items and when the parting response happens, some results are additionally discharged. Splitting might be named as a type of natural transmutation because the subsequent component isn&#39;t equivalent to the first component. Most partings are parallel splitting (delivering two charged pieces), yet infrequently (2 to multiple times for every 1000 occasions), three emphatically charged sections are created, in a ternary splitting. The littlest of these pieces in ternary procedures go in size from a proton to an argon core. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">The results created in the splitting response may remember free neutrons or photons for the type of gamma beams and other atomic sections, for example, beta or alpha particles. The procedure of splitting of substantial components is principally an exothermic response which discharges colossal measure of valuable vitality. The discharged vitality might be as either gamma beams or active vitality. The vitality discharged by Nuclear Fission might be utilized for atomic force or to drive blast of atomic weapons. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">The most regular parting response happens when moderate moving neutrons strike 92U235. The accompanying atomic response happens. </span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#2980b9"><span style="font-size:18px"><strong>Nuclear Chain Reaction </strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">On the off chance that more than one of the neutrons created in the above splitting response is equipped for initiating a parting response (if U235 is accessible), at that point the quantity of splitting occurring at progressive stages goes expanding at an exceptionally energetic rate and this produces a progression of splitting. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">This is known as an nuclear chain reaction. The chain reaction takes place just if the size of the fissionable material (U235) is more prominent than a specific size called the basic size. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">92U235 + 0n1 &mdash; &gt; 56Ba141 + 36Kr92 + 3 0n1 + 200 MeV </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">On the off chance that the quantity of parting in a given interim of time continues expanding constantly, at that point a state of the blast is made. In such cases, the chain response is known as an uncontrolled chain reaction. In a chain response, the quick-moving neutrons are consumed by specific substances known as mediators (like overwhelming water), at that point, the quantity of partings can be controlled and the chain response is such cases is known as controlled chain response. This structures the premise of an atomic reactor. </span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="color:#2980b9"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:18px"><strong>Neutron Cross &ndash; Section </strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">The neutron cross-area for a specific response depicts the likelihood of the event of a neutron included response like that of parting. The cross-segment is essentially a zone that encompasses the core and on the off chance that the response is to happen, at that point, the approaching neutron must go through this region. As the speed of the neutron decreases from around 20,000 km/s to 2 km/s, the splitting and the related cross areas will in general increment. In cores with an odd number of neutrons, for example, U235, the parting cross-area turns out to be exceptionally huge at the warm energies of moderate neutrons.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><strong><u><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Problem 1:</span></u></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">When a beta particle is emitted from a nucleus the effect on its neutron-proton ratio is</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">(a) increased&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; (b)&nbsp;decreased<br /> (c) remains same&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;(d)&nbsp;first (1) then (2)</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Solution:-</span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Since a beta particle is emitted from the nucleus, so we have,&nbsp;</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><sub><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Z</span></sub><span style="font-size:11.0pt">X<sup>A</sup>&nbsp;&mdash;&mdash;&gt;&nbsp;<sub>Z+1</sub>Y<sup>A</sup>&nbsp;+&nbsp;<sub>&ndash;1</sub>e<sup>0</sup>&nbsp;(&beta;) + v</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><sub><span style="font-size:11.0pt">0</span></sub><span style="font-size:11.0pt">n<sup>t</sup>&nbsp;&mdash;&mdash;&gt;&nbsp;<sub>1</sub>P<sup>1</sup>&nbsp;+&nbsp;<sub>&ndash;1</sub>e<sup>0</sup>&nbsp;(&beta;) + v&nbsp; &nbsp;</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Hence, N<sub>n</sub> / N<sub>p</sub> i.e. the neutron-proton ratio is decreased.&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><strong><u>Problem 2</u></strong>:</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">In which sequence, the radioactive radiations are emitted in the following nuclear reactions?</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><sub><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Z</span></sub><span style="font-size:11.0pt">X<sup>A</sup>&nbsp;&mdash;&gt;&nbsp;<sub>Z+1</sub>Y<sup>A</sup>&nbsp;&mdash;&gt;&nbsp;<sub>Z&ndash;1</sub>K<sup>A&ndash;4</sup>&nbsp;&mdash;&gt;&nbsp;<sub>Z&ndash;1</sub>K<sup>A&ndash;4</sup></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">(a) &beta;, &alpha;&nbsp;and&nbsp;&gamma;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;(b)&nbsp;&beta;,&nbsp;&gamma;&nbsp;and&nbsp;&alpha;<br /> (c)&nbsp;&alpha;,&nbsp;&beta;&nbsp;and&nbsp;&gamma;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;(d) &gamma;,&nbsp;&alpha;&nbsp;and&nbsp;&beta;</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Solution</span></strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt">:-</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">We know that on the emission of a&nbsp;&alpha;-particle from the nucleus, atomic number reduces by 2 and mass number reduces by 4. And on emission of&nbsp;&beta;-particle from the nucleus, the atomic number increases by 1. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Similarly on emission of&nbsp;&gamma;-particle from the nucleus, there is no change in the atomic number or the mass number. Using these concepts we note that in the first part of the sequence, there is an increase in the atomic number by 1. So it has to be a beta particle. Then there is a decrease in atomic number by 2 and reduction in mass number by 4. So it is an alpha-particle. Then there is no change and hence it is gamma particle. So the answer is (A).&nbsp;</span></span></span></span></p>

Related Videos

play
419668408

1.8 K+

5.5 K+

3:45
play
573845798

200+

1.1 K+

2:11
play
643173687

53

400+

2:13
play
9865378

1.2 K+

24.9 K+

12:18
play
643171188

8

100+

2:36
play
17152147

700+

14.1 K+

4:36
play
96606338

700+

14.8 K+

0:48
play
15828335

1.7 K+

33.5 K+

3:47
play
96610604

2.1 K+

42.0 K+

4:15
play
561005443

100+

3.7 K+

56:20
play
643446662

19

300+

12:54
play
203457004

52

700+

play
643966857

7

100+

7:25
play
427685380

37

700+

1:27
play
644990808

8

100+

Very Important Questions

bottom open in app
By using this site you agree to the use of cookies. Check our Cookie Policy for more details