logo
search
search
user
login
Login

Home

>

English

>

Class 11

>

Chemistry

>

Chapter

>

Equilibrium

>

Salts Of Strong Acids And Stro...

Salts Of Strong Acids And Strong Bases

check-circle

Answer

Step by step solution by experts to help you in doubt clearance & scoring excellent marks in exams.

Updated On: 14-6-2020

Apne doubts clear karein ab Whatsapp par bhi. Try it now.
CLICK HERE

Loading DoubtNut Solution for you

Watch 1000+ concepts & tricky questions explained!

90.3 K+

85.7 K+

check-circle

Text Solution

Solution :
<h1><strong><span style="color:#2980b9"><span style="font-size:20px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Hydrolysis of Salts | Salt Hydrolysis, pH of a Salt Solution, Types of Salts </span></span></span></strong></h1> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-size:10.5pt">Salt is an essential substance for the human body.&nbsp; Salt is made from an acid and a base; it can react with water and produce acidic, basic, or neutral solutions. In this lesson, we will know about salt hydrolysis and how to determine whether the salt is acidic, basic, or neutral, </span>and ph of their solutions<span style="font-size:10.5pt">.</span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-size:18px"><strong><span style="color:#2980b9"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Hydrolysis Of Salt</span></span></strong></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-size:10.5pt">The hydrolysis reaction is a reaction involving the breaking of a bond in a molecule using water. The reaction primarily occurs between an ion and water molecules and mostly changes the pH of a solution. Primarily, in chemistry, there are three types of hydrolysis: salt hydrolysis, acid hydrolysis, and base hydrolysis.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:10.5pt">Salt&nbsp;is an ionic compound prepared from the reaction of an acid and a base solution. Salts help the body by forming solutions that are acidic, basic, or neutral. Depending on the situation, your body needs different types of solutions to function and maintain its natural processes. Let&#39;s start with some key definitions before jumping into the topic.</span></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-size:10.5pt">An&nbsp;ion&nbsp;is an atom with an electrical charge that is made from losing or gaining electrons.</span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-size:10.5pt">A&nbsp;hydroxide ion (OH-)&nbsp;is made when the conjugate base accepts a proton from water and causes the aqueous solution to become basic</span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-size:10.5pt">A&nbsp;conjugate acid&nbsp;is a substance made when the base accepts a hydrogen ion.</span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-size:10.5pt">A&nbsp;conjugate base&nbsp;is a substance made when the acid donates a hydrogen ion.</span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-size:10.5pt">A&nbsp;hydronium ion (H3O+)&nbsp;is formed when the conjugate acid donates a proton to water, causing it to become the acidic solution.</span></span></span></span></li> </ul> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:10.5pt">Those were the key terms to learn and understand&nbsp;salt hydrolysis, which can be simply explained that when a salt completely dissociates in water and its anion or cation reacts with the water to form hydroxide ions or hydronium ions that affect the pH of the solution.</span></span></span></span></p> <h2><strong><span style="color:#2980b9"><span style="font-size:18px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Salt of Strong Acids and Weak Bases</span></span></span></strong></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:10.5pt">Salt formed from a strong acid, and a weak base will form an acidic solution when added to water. It occurs because when the salt dissociates, the conjugate acid of the weak base will donate a proton, or a hydrogen ion, to water and produces hydronium. NH<sub>4</sub>NO<sub>3 </sub>is a salt that is prepared from a strong acid, HNO3, and a weak base, NH<sub>3</sub>. When NH<sub>4</sub>NO<sub>3</sub> is added to water, the salt breaks into NH<sub>4</sub>+ and NO<sub>3</sub>- ions. The NH<sub>4</sub>+ ion, which is the conjugate acid of the weak base, reacts with water by losing one hydrogen to water and producing hydronium.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:10.5pt">Below are the equations to express how the salt dissociates and how the conjugate acid of the weak base, or the ammonium ion, reacts with water.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:10.5pt">NH4NO3(s) &lt;--&gt; NH4+(aq) + NO3-(aq)</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:10.5pt">NH4+(aq) + H20(l) &lt;--&gt; NH3(aq) + H3O+(aq)</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:10.5pt">With more hydronium ions (H3O) in the water, the solution becomes more acidic than basic.</span></span></span></span></p> <h2><strong><span style="color:#2980b9"><span style="font-size:18px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Salt of Weak Acids and Strong Bases</span></span></span></strong></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:10.5pt">Salt formed from a weak acid and a strong base will make a basic solution when added to the water. It occurs because when the salt dissociates, the conjugate base of the weak acid will accept a proton, or hydrogen from water and form hydroxides. KF is salt from a strong base, KOH, and a weak acid, HF. When the salt is added to water, it dissociates into K+ ion and F- ions. The F- ion, which is the conjugate base of the weak acid, reacts with water by gaining one hydrogen from water and producing hydroxide.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:10.5pt">KF(s) &lt;--&gt; K+(aq) + F-(aq)</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-size:10.5pt">F-(aq)+ H20(l) &lt;--&gt;HF(aq) + OH-(aq)</span></span></span></span></p> <h2><strong><span style="color:#2980b9"><span style="font-size:18px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">pH of Salt Solutions</span></span></span></strong></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt">It is often helpful to be able to predict the effect a salt solution will have on the pH of a certain solution. Knowledge of the relevant acidity or basicity constants allows us to carry out the necessary calculations.</span></span></span></p> <h3><strong><span style="color:#3498db"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Neutral Salts</span></span></span></strong></h3> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt">Neutral salts (pH = 7) are from strong electrolytes (100% ionization)</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt">&nbsp;(a) Ionic Compounds: </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt">NaCl(aq) &reg; Na+ (aq) + Cl- (aq)</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt"><strong>HCl(aq) + H2O(l) &reg; H3O+ (aq) + Cl- (aq), </strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt">In the above reaction, H2O(l) is a base, </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt">H3O+ (aq)&nbsp; is a&nbsp; conj. Acid</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt">HCl(aq) is Infinitely strong acid </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt">Cl- (aq) isInfinitely weak base</span></span></span></p> <h3><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="color:#3498db"><strong><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Basic Salts</span></strong></span></span></h3> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt">Basic salts (pH &gt; 7) are conjugate bases of weak acids.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt"><strong>HClO(aq) + H2O(l) = H3O+ (aq) + ClO- (aq)</strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt">In the above reaction,</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt">HClO(aq) &ndash;weak acid; CIO-(aq)&mdash;conj. base</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt"><strong>ClO- (aq) + H2O(l) = OH- (aq) + HClO(aq) </strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt">In the above reaction,</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt">CIO-(aq)----conj. Base;&nbsp;&nbsp; OH-(aq)-----pH &gt; 7</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt">Ka (HClO) = 2.9 x 10<sup>-8</sup>; and Kb = Kw/ Ka </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt">Kb = 1.0 x 10<sup>-14</sup>/ 2.9 x 10<sup>-8</sup></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt">Kb (ClO- ) = 3.4 x 10<sup>-7</sup></span></span></span></p> <h3><strong><span style="color:#3498db"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Acidic Salts</span></span></span></strong></h3> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt">Acidic Salts (pH &lt; 7) are conjugate acids of weak bases </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt"><strong>NH<sub>3</sub> (aq) + H2O(l) = OH- (aq) + NH<sub>4</sub><sup>+ </sup>(aq) </strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt">In the above reaction,</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt">NH3 (aq) --- weak base; NH4 <sup>+ </sup>(aq) ----conj. Acid </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt"><strong>NH<sub>4 </sub>+ (aq) + H2O(l) = H<sub>3</sub>O+ (aq) + NH<sub>3</sub> (aq)</strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt">In the above reaction,</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt">NH<sub>4</sub><sup>+ </sup>(aq) ----conj. Acid ;H<sub>3</sub>O+ (aq)----- pH &lt; 7</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt">Kb (NH<sub>3</sub> ) = 1.8 x 10<sup>-5</sup> ; and Ka = Kw/ Kb</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt">Ka = 1.0 x 10<sup>-14</sup>/ 1.8 x 10<sup>-5</sup></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt">&nbsp;Ka (NH<sub>4</sub>+ ) = 5.6 x 10<sup>-10</sup></span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align:justify"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:10.5pt">In regard to the salt of weak acid and weak base, the nature of the medium after&nbsp;hydrolysis</span><strong><span style="font-size:10.5pt">&nbsp;</span></strong><span style="font-size:10.5pt">is based in the following manner:</span></span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align:justify"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:10.5pt">(i)&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; If K</span><sub><span style="font-size:11.0pt">a</span></sub><span style="font-size:10.5pt"> = K</span><sub><span style="font-size:11.0pt">b</span></sub><span style="font-size:10.5pt">, the nature of the medium will be neutral.</span></span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align:justify"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:10.5pt">(ii)&nbsp;&nbsp; If K</span><sub><span style="font-size:11.0pt">a</span></sub><span style="font-size:10.5pt">&gt;K</span><sub><span style="font-size:11.0pt">b</span></sub><span style="font-size:10.5pt">, the nature of the medium will be acidic.</span></span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align:justify"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:10.5pt">(iii)&nbsp; If K</span><sub><span style="font-size:11.0pt">a</span></sub><span style="font-size:10.5pt">&lt;K</span><sub><span style="font-size:11.0pt">b</span></sub><span style="font-size:10.5pt">, the nature of the medium will be basic.</span></span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align:justify"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:10.5pt">The degree of&nbsp;hydrolysis&nbsp;of salts of weak bases and weak acids remains unaffected by dilution due to no concentration term in the expression of the degree of hydrolysis.</span></span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align:justify"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:10.5pt">The degree of&nbsp;hydrolysis&nbsp;always increases with an increase in the temperature because, at high temperatures, the increase in K</span><sub><span style="font-size:11.0pt">w</span></sub>&nbsp;<span style="font-size:10.5pt">is greater as compared to K</span><sub><span style="font-size:11.0pt">a</span></sub><span style="font-size:10.5pt">&nbsp;and K</span><sub><span style="font-size:11.0pt">b</span></sub><span style="font-size:11.0pt">.</span></span></span></span></p>

Related Videos

play
9864979

2.9 K+

58.7 K+

12:04
play
9864980

16.0 K+

40.3 K+

8:25
play
9864966

9.9 K+

33.1 K+

7:26
play
9864969

600+

13.5 K+

7:54
play
30685527

2.0 K+

40.8 K+

4:35
play
12226036

500+

11.6 K+

3:24
play
53716822

7.1 K+

12.9 K+

3:29
play
30707475

700+

14.9 K+

2:32
play
52405976

4.1 K+

8.1 K+

play
43956645

800+

17.1 K+

play
13168297

2.4 K+

48.8 K+

4:32
play
9865386

1.0 K+

20.8 K+

13:29
play
58129036

3.5 K+

69.9 K+

4:10
play
11467452

1.9 K+

38.9 K+

1:18
play
70057666

1.6 K+

32.0 K+

2:37

Very Important Questions

bottom open in app
By using this site you agree to the use of cookies. Check our Cookie Policy for more details