logo
search
search
user
login
Login

Home

>

English

>

Class 12

>

Chemistry

>

Chapter

>

Solutions

>

RAOULT'S LAW...

RAOULT'S LAW

check-circle

Answer

Step by step solution by experts to help you in doubt clearance & scoring excellent marks in exams.

Updated On: 20-4-2020

Apne doubts clear karein ab Whatsapp par bhi. Try it now.
CLICK HERE

Loading DoubtNut Solution for you

Watch 1000+ concepts & tricky questions explained!

87.3 K+

4.4 K+

check-circle

Text Solution

Solution :
<h1><strong><span style="font-size:16pt"><span style="color:#0070c0">Raoult&rsquo;s Law</span></span></strong></h1> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Fran&ccedil;ois-Marie Raoult, a French chemist, established Raoult&rsquo;s law, he observed that the vapour pressure of the solution reduced simultaneously when substances were blended in a solution. Raoult&rsquo;s law was established in 1887, and it is also considered as the law of thermodynamics. </span></span></span></p> <h2><strong><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#0070c0">What is Raoult&rsquo;s Law?</span></span></strong></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">It states that a solvent&rsquo;s partial vapour pressure in a solution is equivalent or indistinguishable from the vapour pressure of the pure (unadulterated) solvent multiplied by its mole fraction in the solution.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Raoult&rsquo;s law equation can be expressed as:</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">P<sub>solution</sub>&nbsp;= &Chi;<sub>solvent&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </sub>x<sub> &nbsp;</sub>P<sup>0</sup><sub>solvent</sub></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">P<sub>solution</sub>&nbsp;<span style="font-family:Wingdings">&agrave;</span> vapour pressure of the solution<br /> P<sup>0</sup><sub>solvent t</sub>&nbsp;<span style="font-family:Wingdings">&agrave;</span>vapour pressure of the pure solvent</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">&Chi;<sub>solvent</sub> <span style="font-family:Wingdings">&agrave;</span> mole fraction of the solvent</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">In a solution of two volatile liquids A and B in a holder. Due to volatility, there would be the particles of A and B in the vapour form.&nbsp; vapour phase. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Subsequently, the vapour particles of both A and B apply partial vapour pressure which contributes to the total vapour pressure over the solution.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="color:#000000">Raoult&rsquo;s law further states that at&nbsp;equilibrium,</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">PA=P<sub>∘</sub><sub>A</sub> . x<sub>A&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </sub>,&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; PB= P<sub>∘</sub><sub>B</sub> . x<sub>B</sub></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">P<sub>A</sub>&nbsp;is the partial pressure of Liquid A.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">P∘A is vapour pressure of pure A at that temperature.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">x<sub>A</sub> &nbsp;is mole fraction of Liquid A.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">P<sub>B</sub>&nbsp;is the partial pressure of Liquid B.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">P∘B is vapour pressure of pure B at that temperature.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">X<sub>B</sub> &nbsp;is mole fraction of Liquid B.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Hence&nbsp;</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">PT=PA+PB(Dalton&prime;sLaw)&nbsp;= P<sub>∘</sub><sub>A</sub> . x<sub>A&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; </sub>+ P<sub>∘</sub><sub>B</sub> . x<sub>B</sub>= x<sub>A</sub> +x<sub>B</sub>(P∘B&minus;P∘A)</span></span></span></p> <h2><strong><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#0070c0">Raoult&rsquo;s law Explanation</span></span></strong></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Assume that we have a closed holder loaded up with a volatile fluid A. After some time, because of evaporation, vapour particles of A will begin to form. At that point, the vapour particles of A will be in dynamic equilibrium with the fluid particles (on the surface). The pressure applied by the vapour particles of A at a specific temperature is known as the vapour pressure of A at that specific temperature.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Vapour pressure is demonstrated by all solids and liquids, and it is based on the type of liquid and liquid temperature.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">If we put another liquid B (solute) to that closed holder. The particles of B takes the space between A particles on the surface of the solution.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">For any given fluid, there are a fraction of molecules on the surface that have enough energy to escape to the vapour phase.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">With a lesser number of A particles on the surface of the solution, the vapour particles of A in the vapour form will be low. This will lead to the lower vapour pressure of A.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">If we consider substance B is volatile as well, then there will be lesser number of B particles in the vapour form as compared to pure fluid B.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Raoult&rsquo;s law determines this new vapour pressure (partial pressure) of both A and B, and it depends on the concentration of every component in the fluid phase. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">P<sub>A </sub>&prop; X<sub>A</sub>, P<sub>B </sub>&prop; X<sub>B</sub> =X<sub>A</sub>P<sub>oA</sub>=X<sub>B </sub>P<sub>oB</sub></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">According to Raoult&rsquo;s law, as the mole fraction of a component decreases, its partial pressure also decreases in the vapour state.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><strong>Related Video:</strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer-chemistry/raoults-law-is-related-to-52402144" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">State Raoult&#39;s law for the solution containing volatile components. What is the similarity. Between Raoult&#39;s law and Henry&#39;s law?</a></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer-chemistry/raoults-law-is-for-solvent-and-henrys-law-is-for-solute-11043779" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Raoult&#39;s law is for solvent and Henry&#39;s law is for solute</a></span></span></span></li> </ul> <h2><strong><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#0070c0">Relationship of Raoult&rsquo;s Law and Ideal Gas Law</span></span></strong></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Raoult&rsquo;s law is also very similar to the ideal gas law. The main exception of Raoult&rsquo;s law is that it applies to solutions. On the off chance that you have found out about the ideal gas law we realize that it assumes the ideal conduct of gases where the intermolecular forces that are present between dissimilar molecules is zero or non-existent. Then, Raoult&rsquo;s law assumes that the intermolecular forces that exist between various molecules and similar molecules are equivalent. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Raoult&rsquo;s law is feasible for non-ideal solutions. Be that as it may, this is finished by involving several factors where we need to consider the interactions between molecules of various substances. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">If we take an ideal system consisting of an ideal fluid and ideal vapour, we can additionally determine a useful condition by joining Dalton&rsquo;s Law and Raoult&rsquo;s law.</span></span></span></p> <h2><strong><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#0070c0">Limitations of Raoult&rsquo;s Law</span></span></strong></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">There are a couple of limitations to Raoult&rsquo;s law. </span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Raoult&rsquo;s law is adept for explaining ideal solutions. In any case, ideal solutions are elusive and they are uncommon. Distinctive chemical components must have same &nbsp;chemical composition.</span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Since a considerable lot of the liquids that are in the mixture or solution don&rsquo;t have the same consistency in terms of attractive forces, these sort of solutions tends to digress away from the Rault&rsquo;s law. </span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">There is either a positive or negative deviation. The negative deviation takes place when the vapour pressure is lower than anticipated from Raoult&rsquo;s law. A case of negative deviation is a mixture of chloroform and acetone or a solution of water and hydrochloric acid. </span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">On the other hand, positive deviation takes place when the cohesion between similar molecules is more prominent or that it exceeds adhesion between not at all like or dissimilar molecules. The two components of the mixture can easily escape from the solution. A case of positive deviation is the mixtures of chloroform and ethanol.</span></span></span></li> </ul> <h2><strong><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#0070c0">Difference Between Raoult&rsquo;s law and Henry&rsquo;s law</span></span></strong></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Raoult&rsquo;s law can be seen to be substantial for ideal liquids. The assumption behind Raoult&rsquo;s law is that both the fluid phase and the vapour phase act ideally. This means the association between any two molecules in the fluid and the vapour have no communication. The Raoult&rsquo;s law just states the mole division of a part in the fluid phase is corresponding to the mole fraction of the same segment in the vapour phase. This is substantial just for mixtures of ideal liquids. At the point when you include a small measure of debasement in a solvent (comparable to vast weakening) the collaboration between the polluting influence and the solvent atom is minuscule or actually infinitesimal. In this manner, the fluid still behaves ideally. Consequently, Raoult&rsquo;s law is material for the solvent. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Whereas Henry&rsquo;s law is also characterized for an ideal blend just this time, the assumption is that the mole division of the part is tending to zero. This means when not very many molecules a present in a vast space, the connection between them is almost zero. This makes the system ideal. Accordingly, an infinitesimally small amount of debasement does not feel any cooperation with another particle of the same pollution in the solvent. Subsequently, Henry&rsquo;s law is used for the solute. That is the reason Henry&rsquo;s law constant have colossal values. Gigantic values make sure that even small measure of the solute is represented while figuring the blend properties.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><strong>Important Chapters:</strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/chemistry-ncert-solutions" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">NCERT&nbsp;Solutions for&nbsp;Chemistry</a></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/chemistry-ncert-solutions/class-12-chemistry-chapter-3-solution-1" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">NCERT Solution for Class 12 Chemistry Chapter Solutions</a></span></span></li> </ul>

Related Videos

play
456987183

300+

6.9 K+

51:47
play
642702029

700+

14.0 K+

56:38
play
642664502

32.3 K+

104.5 K+

131:25
play
642709504

8.7 K+

173.5 K+

53:36
play
9864132

4.4 K+

87.3 K+

17:52
play
555575145

800+

16.4 K+

play
555582310

7.0 K+

11.3 K+

play
48624962

10.3 K+

150.4 K+

2:54
play
642520970

35

100+

2:19
play
113072457

1.3 K+

25.2 K+

4:05
play
524808251

100+

2.1 K+

18:56
play
403356493

500+

11.5 K+

2:55
play
637867919

300+

7.6 K+

4:41
play
201232397

900+

2.6 K+

play
644122094

10

200+

2:07

Very Important Questions

Latest Questions

Class 12th

Solutions

Class 12th

Solutions

Class 12th

Solutions

Class 12th

Solutions

Class 12th

Solutions

Class 12th

Solutions

Class 12th

Solutions

Class 12th

Solutions

Class 12th

Solutions

Class 12th

Solutions

bottom open in app
By using this site you agree to the use of cookies. Check our Cookie Policy for more details