logo
search
search
user
login
Login

Oxidation State And Chemical Reactivity

check-circle

Answer

Step by step solution by experts to help you in doubt clearance & scoring excellent marks in exams.

Updated On: 1-5-2020

Apne doubts clear karein ab Whatsapp par bhi. Try it now.
CLICK HERE

Loading DoubtNut Solution for you

Watch 1000+ concepts & tricky questions explained!

17.9 K+

9.2 K+

check-circle

Text Solution

Solution :
<h1><span style="font-size:16pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Oxidation State And Chemical Reactivity</strong></span></span></span></h1> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>What is the Oxidation State for an Atom?</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Oxidation state shows the level of oxidation for an atom in a chemical compound; it is the speculative charge that an atom would have if all bonds to atoms of various elements were totally ionic. Oxidation states are regularly spoken to by whole numbers, which can be sure, negative, or zero. At times, the normal oxidation condition of an element is a part.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">The most noteworthy realized oxidation state is +8 in the tetroxides of ruthenium, xenon, osmium, iridium, hassium, and some complexes including plutonium; the least realized oxidation state is &minus;4 for certain elements in the carbon group.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:12.0pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">An increase in the oxidation state of the atom through chemical reactions is called oxidation, and it involves a loss of electrons; a decrease in an atom&#39;s oxidation state is called decrease, and it involves the addition of electrons.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>General Rules on the Oxidation States</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:10.5pt">Group 15 elements consist of nitrogen, phosphorus, arsenic, antimony and bismuth. As we move down the group, there is a transition from non-metallic to metallic through metalloid character. The elements nitrogen and phosphorus are non-metals, arsenic and antimony are metalloids and lastly, we have bismuth which is a typical metal. The general valence shell&nbsp;electronic configuration&nbsp;of these elements is ns</span><sup><span style="font-size:8.0pt">2</span></sup><span style="font-size:10.5pt">np</span><sup><span style="font-size:8.0pt">3</span></sup><span style="font-size:10.5pt">. The s orbital is filled, and p orbital is half-filled which makes them stable. The oxidation states exhibited by them determines the chemical properties of these elements.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">1. The oxidation state of a stable or free element is zero. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">2. For a simple (monoatomic) &nbsp;particle, the oxidation state is equivalent to the net charge on the particle. For instance, Cl&ndash;has an oxidation state of - 1. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">3. In most compounds, hydrogen has +1 oxidation state and oxygen has -2 oxidation state. The exceptions to this are hydrogen has an oxidation state of &minus;1 in hydrides of active metals, and an oxidation state of &minus;1 in peroxides (such as Hydrogen peroxide or - 1/2 in superoxides (such as potassium monoxide). </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">4. The sum of oxidation states for all atoms in a neutral molecule must be zero. In ions, the mathematical sum of the oxidation states of the constituent atoms must be equivalent to the charge on the particle. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">5. Group 15 elements comprise of nitrogen, phosphorus, arsenic, antimony and bismuth. On moving down the group, there is a shift from non-metallic to the metallic character. Nitrogen and phosphorus are non-metallic members of the group. The general outermost shell electronic configuration of these elements is ns2np3. The s orbital is filled, and p orbital is half-filled, which makes them stable. The oxidation states dictate the chemical properties of these elements showed by them.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><strong><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Related Video:</span></strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer-chemistry/chemical-reactivity-9864371" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Chemical Reactivity</a></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer-chemistry/oxidation-state-and-chemical-reactivity-9864312" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Sulphuric Acid Properties</a></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer-chemistry/oxidation-state-and-chemical-reactivity-and-catenation-9864286" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Oxidation State and Catenation</a></span></span></span></span></li> </ul> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Oxidation state and Chemical Properties of group 15 elements</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">1. </span></span><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">The elements of group 15 for the most part show - 3, +3 and +5 oxidation states. The propensity to show - 3 oxidation state decreases as we descend in the group because of the increase in the atom size and the metallic character. Bismuth scarcely forms any compound in oxidation state of - 3. The stability of the +5 state also decreases as we descend the group. BiF5 is the main very much portrayed Bi(V) compound. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">2. The inert pair effect leads to a decrease in the stability of +5 oxidation state and increase in the +3 oxidation state on going down the group in the periodic table. Nitrogen reacts with oxygen and furthermore exhibits +1, +2, +4 oxidation states. Then again, phosphorus shows +1 and +4 states in some oxoacids. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">3. In nitrogen, the +1 oxidation state to +4 oxidation state tend to be inconsistent in acidic solution. On account of phosphorus, the middle of the road oxidation states disproportionates into +5 and - 3 in the two acids and alkalis. Whereas considering the case of antimony, arsenic, and bismuth, the +3 state is stable concerning disproportionation. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">4. Nitrogen has just 4 electrons in its valence shell (one in s orbital and 3 in p) which is accessible for holding, consequently, it exhibits a most extreme covalency of 4. The heavier elements have an empty d orbital in the valence shell which is used for holding</span><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Chemical reactivity of group 15 elements </strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">The chemical reactivity of group 15 elements are mentioned below: </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">(i) <strong>Reactivity with hydrogen</strong>: Group 15 elements structure hydrides of the sort EH3 where E is group 15 element. On descending the group, the stability of hydrides decreases<strong>.</strong></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">(ii) <strong>Reactivity with oxygen</strong>: Group 15 elements structure the oxides, E2O3 and E2O5. In the oxide, when the oxidation state of group 15 element is higher, it is more acidic than the one with lower oxidation state. On descending the group, the acidic character decreases.</span></span></span><br /> <span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">(iii) <strong>Reactivity with halogens</strong>: Group 15 elements structure the salts &nbsp;EX3 and EX5. Nitrogen just forms &nbsp;NX3 however not NX5 as it lacks the d-orbital. NX3 is unstable and different trihalides are stable.</span></span></span><br /> <span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><strong>(iv) Reactivity towards metals: </strong>Group 15 elements structure twofold compounds with metals. In these compounds, the oxidation state of the metal is - 3.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><strong><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Important Chapters:</span></strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/chemistry-ncert-solutions" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">NCERT&nbsp;Solutions for&nbsp;Chemistry</a></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/chemistry-ncert-solutions/class-12-chemistry-chapter-1-the-pblock-elements-1" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">NCERT Solution for Class 12 Chemistry Chapter 12 The P-Block Elements</a></span></span></span></li> </ul>

Related Videos

play
9864246

9.2 K+

17.9 K+

9:31
play
9864286

6.2 K+

8.5 K+

11:34
play
30713501

2.3 K+

6.8 K+

2:34
play
586005563

11

200+

4:20
play
110475615

33

600+

3:54
play
113073879

600+

1.0 K+

6:42
play
9865080

11.3 K+

13.7 K+

8:10
play
225662304

97

1.9 K+

2:50
play
11482215

900+

18.8 K+

play
639454893

75

1.5 K+

play
113073869

100+

2.6 K+

6:42
play
555580109

100+

2.3 K+

play
55746720

4.9 K+

7.1 K+

3:32
play
55746704

2.1 K+

8.6 K+

14:09
play
234826270

8

100+

6:44

Very Important Questions

Latest Questions

Class 12th

The P-block Elements

bottom open in app
By using this site you agree to the use of cookies. Check our Cookie Policy for more details