Home

>

English

>

Class 12

>

Chemistry

>

Chapter

>

Chemical Kinetics

>

Order And Molecularity...

Order And Molecularity

check-circle

Answer

Step by step solution by experts to help you in doubt clearance & scoring excellent marks in exams.

Updated On: 17-8-2020

Apne doubts clear karein ab Whatsapp par bhi. Try it now.
CLICK HERE

Loading DoubtNut Solution for you

Watch 1000+ concepts & tricky questions explained!

45.5 K+

2.3 K+

check-circle

Text Solution

Solution :
<h1><span style="font-size:16pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri Light&quot;,sans-serif"><span style="color:#2f5496"><strong><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Order And Molecularity</span></strong></span></span></span></h1> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Molecularity of Reaction</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p style="text-align:justify"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">A chemical reaction that occurs in a single step is called a single chemical reaction while a chemical reaction happening in the sequence of at least two steps is called a complicated chemical reaction. The sequence of steps through which a convoluted reaction takes place is called the reaction &ndash; mechanism. Each step in a mechanism is a basic step reaction. </span></span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align:justify"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">The molecularity of a basic reaction is characterized as the minimum number of atoms, molecules,&nbsp; or ions of the reactants(s) that are needed for the reaction to happen and is equivalent to the algebraic sum of the stoichiometric coefficients of the reactant(s) in the chemical equation.</span></span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align:justify"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Typically, molecularity of simple reactions is equivalent to the sum of the number of molecules of reactants engaged with the balanced stoichiometric chemical equation. The molecularity of a chemical reaction is the number of reactant molecules participating in a single step of the reaction.</span></span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align:justify"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">The minimum number of reactant species that meet up or collide in a rate-determining step to form product or products is known as the molecularity of a reaction.</span> <span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">The molecularity of an entire reaction has no significance, and overall kinetics of the reaction depends upon the rate-determining step.&nbsp;The slowest step is the rate-determining step.&nbsp;</span></span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align:justify"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Example&nbsp;:</span></span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align:justify"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:12.0pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:black">&nbsp;&nbsp;<img alt="" src="https://d10lpgp6xz60nq.cloudfront.net/engagement_framework/D304DDC0-D7AC-236F-D9A2-BBAD42BAA6A2.webp" style="height:80px; width:268px" /></span></span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Rate Determining Step</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">The overall rate of a reaction is determined by the rate of the slowest step in the reaction. The slowest step of a chemical reaction is known as the rate-determining step. As long as there is a difference between the rates of the various steps, and you have to measure the overall rate of a reaction, you measure the rate of the rate-determining step, which is the slowest step.</span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong><strong>Order of Reaction</strong></strong></span></span></span></h2> <h2 style="text-align:justify"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">The term&nbsp;order of reaction&nbsp;can be used for any elementary reaction considered to proceed in one direction only, and to specific composite reactions.</span></span></strong></span></span></span></h2> <p style="text-align:justify"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">The mathematical expression indicating the reliance of rate of reaction on the reactant concentration of reactant is called as rate-law or rate-expression of the reaction, and sum of the indices (powers) of the concentration terms showing up in the rate law as observed tentatively is called the order of reaction. </span></span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align:justify"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">Order of the reaction can also be defined as the number</span></span><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black"> of reactant(s) molecules whose concentration changes during the chemical change.</span></span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align:justify"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:black">Order of reaction = Sum of the indices (powers) of the concentration terms in the rate law</span></span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align:justify"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:black">For the chemical reaction vA+wB&rarr;Products</span></span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align:justify"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:black">The rate law is Rate = [A]<sup>v</sup> [B]<sup>w</sup></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align:justify"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:black">Then the overall order of the reaction. n=v+w</span></span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align:justify"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:black">Here&nbsp;v&nbsp;and&nbsp;w&nbsp;are orders in regard to the individual reactants.&nbsp; </span></span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align:justify"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:black">If the reaction is in the form of the reaction mechanism, then the order is determined by the slowest step of the mechanism.</span></span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align:justify"><img alt="" src="https://d10lpgp6xz60nq.cloudfront.net/engagement_framework/76FED9AB-D680-7CD8-8D26-E32FC785EFD9.webp" style="height:98px; width:352px" /></p> <p style="text-align:justify"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">(The overall order of the above reaction is equal to two.)</span></span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align:justify"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><strong><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Arial&quot;,sans-serif">Related Videos:</span></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li style="text-align:justify"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.5pt"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer-chemistry/write-two-differences-between-order-of-reaction-and-molecularity-of-reaction-order-48624919" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Two differences between &#39;order of reaction&#39; and &#39;molecularity of reaction&#39;</a></span></span></span></span></li> <li style="text-align:justify"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.5pt"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer-chemistry/define-molecularity-of-a-reaction-30710866" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Define molecularity of a reaction</a></span></span></span></span></li> <li style="text-align:justify"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.5pt"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer-chemistry/molecularity-of-the-reaction--34509140" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Molecularity of a reaction</a></span></span></span></span></li> </ul> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Types of Order of Reactions</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">The kinetic theory states that small particles of matters are in constant motion and that the temperature of a substance is subject to the speed of this motion. Increased motion is associated with increased temperature. Chemical reactions are assigned reaction orders to study their kinetics.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">The general reaction form is: </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">aA + bB &rarr; cC + dD </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">The chemical reactions are classified as zero-order, first-order, second-order, or blended order (higher-order) reactions.</span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Zero-Order Reactions</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Zero-order reactions (order of reaction = 0) have a constant rate of reaction. The rate of a zero-order reaction is free of the concentration of reactants. The rate law &nbsp;for the zero-order reaction is: </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">rate = k, units of k is M/sec.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">k is rate constant.</span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>First-Order Reactions</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">A first-order reaction (order of reaction = 1) has a reaction rate directly proportional to the concentration of one of the reacting species. The rate of a first-order reaction is proportional to the concentration of one reactant. A typical case of a first-order reaction is radioactive decay, the spontaneous process through which an unstable atomic nucleus dissociates into smaller fragments. The rate law for the first-order reaction is:</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#000000">rate = k[A] (or B), units of k is sec<sup>-1</sup></span><span style="color:black">.</span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Second-Order Reactions</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">A second-order reaction (order of reaction = 2) has a reaction rate directly proportional to the concentration of the square of one reactant or the product of the concentration of two reactants. The formula is:</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">rate = k[A]<sup>2&nbsp; </sup>or k[B]<sup>2</sup>&nbsp;units of k is M<sup>-1</sup> sec<sup>-1</sup></span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Higher-Order Reactions</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Higher-order reactions (mixed-order reactions) have a fractional-order for their rate, such as:</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">rate = k[A]<sup>1/2</sup></span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Factors influencing Rate of Reaction</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Chemical kinetics tells that the rate of a reaction will be increased by factors that increase the kinetic energy of the reactants, prompting the increased probability that the reactants will react with one another. Similarly, factors that decrease the opportunity of reactants colliding into one another might be required to bring down the reaction rate. The fundamental factors that influence the reaction rate are as follows:</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">While chemical kinetics can determine the rate of a chemical reaction, it does not determine the extent to which the reaction occurs. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><strong><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Concentration of Reactants</span></strong><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">: A higher concentration of reacting species leads to more collisions per unit time, which leads to an increased reaction rate (except for zero-order reactions.) </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Temperature:</span></strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt"> In general, increase in temperature leads to an increase in the reaction rate. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Involvment of Catalysts:</span></strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt"> Catalysts (or enzymes) bring down the activation energy required for a a chemical reaction to happen and increase the rate of reaction without being consumed in the process. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Physical State of Reactants:</span></strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt"> The reactants in the same state of matter may come into contact through thermal activity, however surface area and agitation influence reactions between reactants in various phases. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Pressure:</span></strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt"> For reactions including gases, increasing pressure increase the collisions between the molecules of reactants, increasing the reaction rate. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Even though chemical kinetics can predict the rate of a chemical reaction, but it cannot determine the degree to which the reaction occurs.</span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong><strong>Differences between Molecularity and Order of Reaction</strong></strong></span></span></span></h2> <table align="center" border="1" class="Table" style="border:solid windowtext 1.0pt"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="height:24.0pt; vertical-align:top"> <h3 style="text-align:center"><span style="font-size:13.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><strong><strong><span style="color:black">Molecularity</span></strong></strong></span></span></h3> </td> <td style="height:24.0pt; vertical-align:top"> <h3 style="text-align:center"><span style="font-size:13.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><strong><strong><span style="color:black">Order of Reaction</span></strong></strong></span></span></h3> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="height:24.0pt; vertical-align:top"> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><strong><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Arial&quot;,sans-serif"><span style="color:black">It is the o</span></span></span></strong><strong><span style="color:black">verall </span></strong><strong><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Arial&quot;,sans-serif"><span style="color:black">number of r</span></span></span></strong><strong><span style="color:black">eactant(s)</span></strong><strong><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Arial&quot;,sans-serif"><span style="color:black"> (atoms, molecules, or ions) which create the chemical change.</span></span></span></strong></span></span></p> </td> <td style="height:24.0pt; vertical-align:top"> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><strong><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Arial&quot;,sans-serif"><span style="color:black">It is the sum of i</span></span></span></strong><strong><span style="color:black">ndices (</span></strong><strong><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Arial&quot;,sans-serif"><span style="color:black">powers) of molar concentration of the reactant(s) in the rate equation of the chemical reaction.</span></span></span></strong></span></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="height:24.0pt; vertical-align:top"> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><strong><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Arial&quot;,sans-serif"><span style="color:black">It is always a whole number. It cannot be zero.</span></span></span></strong></span></span></p> </td> <td style="height:24.0pt; vertical-align:top"> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><strong><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Arial&quot;,sans-serif"><span style="color:black">It can be a whole number, zero, fraction form.</span></span></span></strong></span></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="height:24.0pt; vertical-align:top"> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><strong><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Arial&quot;,sans-serif"><span style="color:black">It is significant only for simple reactions or individual steps of a complex reaction. It is of no importance for overall reaction.</span></span></span></strong></span></span></p> </td> <td style="height:24.0pt; vertical-align:top"> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><strong><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Arial&quot;,sans-serif"><span style="color:black">It is used for the overall reaction and not for its individual steps.</span></span></span></strong></span></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><strong><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Important Chapters:</span></strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/chemistry-ncert-solutions" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">NCERT&nbsp;Solutions for&nbsp;Chemistry</a></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/chemistry-ncert-solutions/class-12-chemistry-chapter-5-chemical-kinetics-exercise-1" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">NCERT Solution for Class 12 Chemistry Chapter Chemical Kinetics</a></span></span></span></li> </ul>

check-circle

Image Solution

Find answer in image to clear your doubt instantly:

Related Videos

play
96607386

800+

17.8 K+

play
30977699

6.8 K+

136.6 K+

1:26
play
30710903

2.2 K+

44.2 K+

2:04
play
30710854

1.0 K+

20.6 K+

1:47
play
48624919

2.8 K+

56.0 K+

2:29
play
30710679

29.0 K+

30.4 K+

play
11045136

300+

7.2 K+

1:34
play
11045280

1.3 K+

19.5 K+

1:55
play
30977667

2.5 K+

50.0 K+

1:25
play
30710622

26.0 K+

31.5 K+

3:25
play
30710677

8.1 K+

8.2 K+

play
30711123

14.1 K+

137.9 K+

3:58
play
11045273

1.4 K+

28.7 K+

2:23
play
11045288

2.4 K+

48.5 K+

1:45
play
23585675

1.2 K+

23.2 K+

1:56

Very Important Questions

Latest Questions

Class 12th

Chemical Kinetics

Class 12th

Chemical Kinetics

Class 12th

Chemical Kinetics

Class 12th

Chemical Kinetics

Class 12th

Chemical Kinetics

Class 12th

Chemical Kinetics

Class 12th

Chemical Kinetics

Class 12th

Chemical Kinetics

Class 12th

Chemical Kinetics

Class 12th

Chemical Kinetics

bottom open in app
By using this site you agree to the use of cookies. Check our Cookie Policy for more details