Getting Image
Please Wait...
Login
Register now for special offers
+91

Home

>

English

>

Class 12

>

Chemistry

>

Chapter

>

Solutions

>

Normality...

Normality

Updated On: 27-06-2022

UPLOAD PHOTO AND GET THE ANSWER NOW!

Text Solution

Solution : <h1><span style="font-size:16pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri Light&quot;,sans-serif"><span style="color:#2f5496"><strong><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Normality</span></strong></span></span></span></h1> <h2><strong><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0">What is Normality?</span></span></span></strong></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Normality is a proportion of concentration equivalent to the gram equivalent weight per litre of solution. Gram equivalent weight is the ratio of the reactive limit of a molecule. The solute&#39;s job in the reaction decides the solution&#39;s normality. Normality is otherwise called the equivalent concentration of a solution.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><img alt="Normality" src="https://d10lpgp6xz60nq.cloudfront.net/engagement_framework/EAF8700B-2481-19C0-D207-A8BA1360D6A5.webp" style="width:100%" /></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Normality is commonly used in acid-base reactions. Here, a progressively good calculation for normality is considered, where the normality of a solution is equivalent to the molarity increased by the number of equivalents.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Normality = Molarity(M) x number of equivalents</span></span></span></span></p> <h2><strong><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0">Normality Equation</span></span></span></strong></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Normality (N) is the molar concentration &lsquo;c&rsquo;&nbsp;divided by an equivalence factor &lsquo;f&rsquo;</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">N = c/ f</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Normality can also be defined as the gram equivalent weight per litre of solution.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Normality (N) = gram equivalent weight/liters of solution ( expressed in g/L units)</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Normality can also be represented as the product of molarity and the number of equivalents.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Normality (N) = molarity&nbsp;x equivalents</span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Normality Units</span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Normality is denoted by the letter &lsquo;N&rsquo;. It is used to determine the concentration in terms of normality. It can also be calculated as eq/L (equivalent per litre) or meq/L (milliequivalent per litre of 0.001 N, which is generally used for medical purposes).</span></span></span></span></p> <h2><strong><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0">Calculation of Normality</span></span></span></strong></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">To calculate the normality, students can follow below-mentioned tips.</span></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Initially, the students can collect information about the&nbsp;equivalent weight&nbsp;of the reactant molecule of the solute particle. </span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">The second step ideals with calculating the number of gram equivalent of solute.</span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Students must not forget that the volume is to be calculated in litres always.</span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">In the last step, normality is calculated by using the Normality formula and substituting the values.</span></span></span></span></li> </ul> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><strong><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Related Video:</span></strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer-chemistry/molarity-and-normality-9864795" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Molarity And Normality</a></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer-chemistry/what-does-normality-n-represent--32512022" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">What does normality (N) represent ?</a></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer-chemistry/standardization-of-acid-solution-calculate-the-normality-of-a-solution-of-h2so4-if-400-ml-of-the-sol-13168973" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Standardization of Acid Solution</a></span></span></span></span></li> </ul> <h2><strong><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0">Sample Problem</span></span></span></strong></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Calculate the normality of 0.1&nbsp;M H2SO4 for the following reaction:</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">H<sub>2</sub>SO<sub>4</sub>&nbsp;+ 2 NaOH &rarr; Na<sub>2</sub>SO<sub>4</sub>&nbsp;+ 2 H<sub>2</sub>O</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">According to the reaction, 2 moles of H+&nbsp;ions (or 2 equivalents) from sulphuric acid combine with sodium hydroxide to form sodium sulphate and water. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Using the Normality formula:</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">N = molarity x equivalents</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Putting values of molarity and equivalents int the equation<br /> N = 0.1 x 2<br /> N = 0.2 N</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Thus, normality is 0.2N</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Students must get confused by the moles of&nbsp;sodium hydroxide&nbsp;and water in the chemical equation. As we have been provided with the molarity of the acid, therefore, we do not require the additional information. &nbsp;We just have to calculate the number of moles of hydrogen ions that are involved in the reaction. Sulphuric acid is a strong acid, it dissociates into its ions completely.</span></span></span></span></p> <h2><strong><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0">Uses of Normality</span></span></span></strong></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">The most common uses of normality are:</span></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">It is used in&nbsp;precipitation reactions&nbsp;to determine the number of ions that are likely to precipitate in a specific reaction.</span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">It is used in finding the concentrations in acid-base chemistry. Normality is used to determine hydronium ions (H3O+) or hydroxide ions (OH&ndash;) concentrations in a solution.</span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Normality is used in redox reactions to calculate the number of electrons that an oxidizing agent or reducing agent can accept or donate.</span></span></span></span></li> </ul> <h2><strong><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0">Limitations of Normality Based Calculations</span></span></span></strong></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Normality is widely used in acid-base chemistry&nbsp;to prevent the mole ratios in the calculations. While normality is used in redox reactions&nbsp;and precipitation, but there are some limitations to it. These limitations include:</span></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Normality is not a proper unit of concentration in some chemical situation; molarity or molality are much better options for units.</span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Normality calculation needs a defined equivalence factor.</span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Normality is not a specified value for a particular chemical solution. The value can significantly change depending on the&nbsp;chemical reaction. To elucidate further, one solution can contain different normalities for different reactions.</span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Depending on an equivalence factor that can vary with the type of chemical reaction of interest, normality can&#39;t be used for all situations. For instance, a magnesium chloride (MgCl2) solution might be 1 N for the Mg2+&nbsp;ion, yet it is 2 N for the Cl-&nbsp;ion.</span></span></span></span></li> </ul> <h2><strong><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0">Relationships of Normal Acid and Base Solutions</span></span></span></strong></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">To show the relationships of normal acid and base solutions, let us consider an example, a 1N solution of the acid H2SO4 will kill an equivalent volume of a 1N solution of the base NaOH. Even though the H2SO4 yields two (acid) H+ ions per atom versus just one (base) OH-particle per NaOH particle, the calculations of N consider these differences and puts everything into a comparable scale. In a sense, with typicality calculations, you truly can contrast apples and oranges &ndash; acid and base-wise in any case. </span></span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align:justify"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><strong><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Important Chapters:</span></strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li style="text-align:justify"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/chemistry-ncert-solutions" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">NCERT Solution for Chemistry</a></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/chemistry-ncert-solutions/class-12-chemistry-chapter-3-solution-exercise-1" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">NCERT Solution for Class 12 Chemistry Chapter Solution</a></span></span></span></li> </ul>

Answer

Step by step solution by experts to help you in doubt clearance & scoring excellent marks in exams.
Comments

Add a public comment...