logo
search
search
user
login
Login

Normality

check-circle

Answer

Step by step solution by experts to help you in doubt clearance & scoring excellent marks in exams.

Updated On: 20-4-2020

Apne doubts clear karein ab Whatsapp par bhi. Try it now.
CLICK HERE

Loading DoubtNut Solution for you

Watch 1000+ concepts & tricky questions explained!

81.6 K+

4.1 K+

check-circle

Text Solution

Solution :
<h1><span style="font-size:16pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri Light&quot;,sans-serif"><span style="color:#2f5496"><strong><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Normality</span></strong></span></span></span></h1> <h2><strong><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0">What is Normality?</span></span></span></strong></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Normality is a proportion of concentration equivalent to the gram equivalent weight per litre of solution. Gram equivalent weight is the ratio of the reactive limit of a molecule. The solute&#39;s job in the reaction decides the solution&#39;s normality. Normality is otherwise called the equivalent concentration of a solution.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><img alt="Normality" src="https://d10lpgp6xz60nq.cloudfront.net/engagement_framework/EAF8700B-2481-19C0-D207-A8BA1360D6A5.webp" style="width:100%" /></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Normality is commonly used in acid-base reactions. Here, a progressively good calculation for normality is considered, where the normality of a solution is equivalent to the molarity increased by the number of equivalents.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Normality = Molarity(M) x number of equivalents</span></span></span></span></p> <h2><strong><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0">Normality Equation</span></span></span></strong></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Normality (N) is the molar concentration &lsquo;c&rsquo;&nbsp;divided by an equivalence factor &lsquo;f&rsquo;</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">N = c/ f</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Normality can also be defined as the gram equivalent weight per litre of solution.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Normality (N) = gram equivalent weight/liters of solution ( expressed in g/L units)</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Normality can also be represented as the product of molarity and the number of equivalents.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Normality (N) = molarity&nbsp;x equivalents</span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Normality Units</span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Normality is denoted by the letter &lsquo;N&rsquo;. It is used to determine the concentration in terms of normality. It can also be calculated as eq/L (equivalent per litre) or meq/L (milliequivalent per litre of 0.001 N, which is generally used for medical purposes).</span></span></span></span></p> <h2><strong><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0">Calculation of Normality</span></span></span></strong></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">To calculate the normality, students can follow below-mentioned tips.</span></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Initially, the students can collect information about the&nbsp;equivalent weight&nbsp;of the reactant molecule of the solute particle. </span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">The second step ideals with calculating the number of gram equivalent of solute.</span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Students must not forget that the volume is to be calculated in litres always.</span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">In the last step, normality is calculated by using the Normality formula and substituting the values.</span></span></span></span></li> </ul> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><strong><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Related Video:</span></strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer-chemistry/molarity-and-normality-9864795" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Molarity And Normality</a></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer-chemistry/what-does-normality-n-represent--32512022" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">What does normality (N) represent ?</a></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer-chemistry/standardization-of-acid-solution-calculate-the-normality-of-a-solution-of-h2so4-if-400-ml-of-the-sol-13168973" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Standardization of Acid Solution</a></span></span></span></span></li> </ul> <h2><strong><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0">Sample Problem</span></span></span></strong></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Calculate the normality of 0.1&nbsp;M H2SO4 for the following reaction:</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">H<sub>2</sub>SO<sub>4</sub>&nbsp;+ 2 NaOH &rarr; Na<sub>2</sub>SO<sub>4</sub>&nbsp;+ 2 H<sub>2</sub>O</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">According to the reaction, 2 moles of H+&nbsp;ions (or 2 equivalents) from sulphuric acid combine with sodium hydroxide to form sodium sulphate and water. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Using the Normality formula:</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">N = molarity x equivalents</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Putting values of molarity and equivalents int the equation<br /> N = 0.1 x 2<br /> N = 0.2 N</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Thus, normality is 0.2N</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Students must get confused by the moles of&nbsp;sodium hydroxide&nbsp;and water in the chemical equation. As we have been provided with the molarity of the acid, therefore, we do not require the additional information. &nbsp;We just have to calculate the number of moles of hydrogen ions that are involved in the reaction. Sulphuric acid is a strong acid, it dissociates into its ions completely.</span></span></span></span></p> <h2><strong><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0">Uses of Normality</span></span></span></strong></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">The most common uses of normality are:</span></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">It is used in&nbsp;precipitation reactions&nbsp;to determine the number of ions that are likely to precipitate in a specific reaction.</span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">It is used in finding the concentrations in acid-base chemistry. Normality is used to determine hydronium ions (H3O+) or hydroxide ions (OH&ndash;) concentrations in a solution.</span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Normality is used in redox reactions to calculate the number of electrons that an oxidizing agent or reducing agent can accept or donate.</span></span></span></span></li> </ul> <h2><strong><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0">Limitations of Normality Based Calculations</span></span></span></strong></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Normality is widely used in acid-base chemistry&nbsp;to prevent the mole ratios in the calculations. While normality is used in redox reactions&nbsp;and precipitation, but there are some limitations to it. These limitations include:</span></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Normality is not a proper unit of concentration in some chemical situation; molarity or molality are much better options for units.</span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Normality calculation needs a defined equivalence factor.</span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Normality is not a specified value for a particular chemical solution. The value can significantly change depending on the&nbsp;chemical reaction. To elucidate further, one solution can contain different normalities for different reactions.</span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Depending on an equivalence factor that can vary with the type of chemical reaction of interest, normality can&#39;t be used for all situations. For instance, a magnesium chloride (MgCl2) solution might be 1 N for the Mg2+&nbsp;ion, yet it is 2 N for the Cl-&nbsp;ion.</span></span></span></span></li> </ul> <h2><strong><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0">Relationships of Normal Acid and Base Solutions</span></span></span></strong></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">To show the relationships of normal acid and base solutions, let us consider an example, a 1N solution of the acid H2SO4 will kill an equivalent volume of a 1N solution of the base NaOH. Even though the H2SO4 yields two (acid) H+ ions per atom versus just one (base) OH-particle per NaOH particle, the calculations of N consider these differences and puts everything into a comparable scale. In a sense, with typicality calculations, you truly can contrast apples and oranges &ndash; acid and base-wise in any case. </span></span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align:justify"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><strong><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Important Chapters:</span></strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li style="text-align:justify"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/chemistry-ncert-solutions" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">NCERT Solution for Chemistry</a></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/chemistry-ncert-solutions/class-12-chemistry-chapter-3-solution-exercise-1" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">NCERT Solution for Class 12 Chemistry Chapter Solution</a></span></span></span></li> </ul>

Related Videos

play
643973843

24

400+

3:33
play
70060828

1.1 K+

21.3 K+

2:33
play
69178969

500+

11.0 K+

1:36
play
642671532

300+

1.9 K+

32:30
play
647398016

15

300+

play
642999202

17

300+

4:06
play
645525144

6

100+

2:48
play
646441873

300+

300+

12:14
play
643666565

48

900+

110:26
play
642957734

800+

2.8 K+

110:20
play
643033697

100+

3.2 K+

114:01
play
9864125

4.1 K+

81.6 K+

13:28
play
645008581

4.6 K+

38.8 K+

41:26
play
644983489

6.3 K+

52.9 K+

38:39
play
645357294

2.3 K+

42.8 K+

28:08

Very Important Questions

Latest Questions

Class 12th

Solutions

Class 12th

Solutions

Class 12th

Solutions

Class 12th

Solutions

Class 12th

Solutions

Class 12th

Solutions

Class 12th

Solutions

Class 12th

Solutions

Class 12th

Solutions

Class 12th

Solutions

bottom open in app
By using this site you agree to the use of cookies. Check our Cookie Policy for more details