logo
search
search
user
login
Login

Nernst Equation

check-circle

Answer

Step by step solution by experts to help you in doubt clearance & scoring excellent marks in exams.

Updated On: 13-6-2020

Apne doubts clear karein ab Whatsapp par bhi. Try it now.
CLICK HERE

Loading DoubtNut Solution for you

Watch 1000+ concepts & tricky questions explained!

63.3 K+

3.2 K+

check-circle

Text Solution

Solution :
<h1><span style="font-size:16pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri Light&quot;,sans-serif"><span style="color:#2e74b5"><strong><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Nernst Equation</span></strong></span></span></span></h1> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>What is Nernst Equation?</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">The Nernst equation describes a connection between the cell potential of an electrochemical cell, the standard cell potential, temperature, and the reaction quotient. Considerably under non-standard conditions, the cell potentials of electrochemical cells can be computed using the Nernst condition. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">The Nernst condition is regularly used to ascertain the cell potential of an electrochemical cell at some random temperature, pressure, and reactant concentration. The condition was presented by a German chemist Walther Hermann Nernst in 1881.</span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Nernst Equation Expression</strong></span></span></span></h2> <h3><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri Light&quot;,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Nernst equation is an equation associating the limit of an atom or ion to take up at least one electrons (reduction potential) measured at any conditions to that evaluated at standard conditions (standard reduction potentials) of 298K and one atmospheric pressure or one molar. </span></span></span></span></span></h3> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Nernst Equation for Single Electrode Potential</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><img alt="" src="https://d10lpgp6xz60nq.cloudfront.net/engagement_framework/1E5F1839-FC0C-30A7-E17F-760D28386935.webp" style="height:53px; width:160px" /></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:10.5pt">here,</span></span></span></span></p> <p style="margin-left:24px; text-align:justify"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">E</span></span><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:Wingdings">&agrave;</span></span><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"> cell potential of the cell</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="margin-left:24px; text-align:justify"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">E<sup>0&nbsp; </sup></span></span><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:Wingdings">&agrave;</span></span><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"> cell potential under standard-state conditions</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="margin-left:24px; text-align:justify"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">R </span></span><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:Wingdings">&agrave;</span></span><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"> universal gas constant=</span></span><strong> </strong><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">8.314 J/mol-K</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="margin-left:24px; text-align:justify"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">T &nbsp;</span></span><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:Wingdings">&agrave;</span></span><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"> temperature (kelvin), typically 298K or 25<sup>o </sup>C</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p style="margin-left:24px; text-align:justify"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">n &nbsp;</span></span><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:Wingdings">&agrave;</span></span><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"> number of electrons transferred in the balanced redox reaction</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:10.5pt">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; F &nbsp;</span><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:Wingdings">&agrave;</span></span><span style="font-size:10.5pt"> Faraday constant, the charge on a mole of electrons =&nbsp;96,500 Coulomb/mole</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; ln Qc&nbsp;=&nbsp;the natural log of the reaction quotient </span></span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Derivation of Nernst Equation</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">The Nernst Equation is derived from the Gibbs free energy and emf under non-standard conditions.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt">&nbsp;E<sub>o</sub>=E<sub>oreduction</sub>&minus;E<sub>ooxidation </sub></span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">When E<sub>o</sub> is a positive value, the chemical reaction is spontaneous. However, when E<sub>o</sub> is negative, the reaction is non-spontaneous. Since the change in Gibbs free energy, &Delta;G, is also related to the spontaneity of a reaction, therefore, &Delta;G and E are related. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Specifically, <strong>&Delta;G=&minus;nFE</strong> where n is the number of electrons transferred in the reaction, F is the Faraday constant (96500 C/mol) and E is potential difference. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Under standard conditions, this equation is&nbsp; <strong>&Delta;G<sub>o</sub>=&minus;nFE<sub>o</sub></strong><sub>.</sub> </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Since <strong>&Delta;G=&Delta;Go+RT lnQ</strong>&hellip;&hellip;..(equation 1) </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Substituting &Delta;G=&minus;nFE and &Delta;Go=&minus;nFEo into equation (1), we get:</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">&nbsp;&minus;<strong>nFE=&minus;nFEo +RT lnQ </strong></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Dividing both sides by &minus;nF, we get:</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt">E=E<sub>o</sub> &minus;RT nF lnQ</span></strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt">&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;..(equation 2) </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Above equation can be rewritten in the form of log base 10, that is: </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt">E=E<sub>o</sub> &minus;2.303RT nF logQ</span></strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt">&hellip;&hellip;&hellip;.(equation 3)</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">&nbsp;At standard temperature T = 298K, <strong>the 2.303RTF equals .0592 V</strong>, so equation (3) turns into: </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt">E = E<sub>o</sub> &minus;.0592Vn logQ</span></strong> </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">The equation above shows that the electrical potential of a cell depends upon the reaction quotient Q of the reaction. As the redox reaction moves further, reactants are consumed; thus, the concentration of reactants reduces. Conversely, the concentration of product increases due to the increase in products formation. As this occurs, the cell potential slowly decreases until the reaction attains equilibrium point, at which &Delta;G =0.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">At equilibrium, the reaction quotient Q=Keq. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Also, at equilibrium, &Delta;G =0 and &Delta;G=&minus;nFE, so E =0. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Therefore, substituting Q=Keq and E =0 into the Nernst equation, we get:</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt">&nbsp;0=E<sub>o</sub>&minus;RTnF ln Keq </span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">At standard conditions, the equation above simplifies into:</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">&nbsp;<strong>0=E<sub>o</sub> &minus;0.0592nlogKeq</strong></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">&nbsp;This equation can be rearranged into<strong>: logKeq=nEo0.0592</strong></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Related Videos:</span></strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer-chemistry/the-law-formulated-by-nernst-is-30685753" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">The law formulated by Nernst is</a></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer-chemistry/what-is-nernst-equation-what-is-the-significance-of-each-term-in-the-equation--30710143" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">What is Nernst equation? What is the significance of each term in the equation?</a></span></span></span></span></li> </ul> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Nernst Equation Applications</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">The Nernst equation can be applied to determine:</span></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Unknown ionic concentrations</span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Single electrode oxidation or potential at any conditions</span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Standard electrode potentials</span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Comparing the relative capacity as a reductive or oxidative agent.</span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Finding the possibility of the combination of such single electrodes to produce electric potential.</span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Solubility of sparingly soluble salts </span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Emf of an electrochemical cell</span></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">&nbsp;pH of solutions</span></span></span></span></li> </ul> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Limitations of Nernst Equation</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">The activity of an atom or ion in a dilute solution is near to infinity and can be expressed in terms of the ion concentration. Be that as it may, for solutions having high concentrations, the particle concentration is not equivalent to the ion activity. To use the Nernst equation in such cases, test measurements must be led to acquire the genuine movement of the particle. </span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Another limitation of this equation is that it can&#39;t be used to measure cell potential when there is a current flowing across the electrode. This is because the progression of current affects the action of the ions on the surface of the cathode. Also, extra factors such as resistive loss and overpotential must be considered when there is a current flowing through the electrode.</span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><strong><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Important Chapters:</span></strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/chemistry-ncert-solutions" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">NCERT&nbsp;Solutions for&nbsp;Chemistry</a></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/chemistry-ncert-solutions/class-12-chemistry-chapter-4-electrochemistry-1" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">NCERT Solution for Class 12 Chemistry Chapter 12 Electrochemistry</a></span></span></span></li> </ul>

Related Videos

play
631915283

100+

3.9 K+

42:20
play
632853814

2.9 K+

58.3 K+

47:04
play
642923337

300+

500+

35:20
play
249877018

400+

9.0 K+

22:15
play
642945250

23

400+

34:11
play
642883976

100+

2.1 K+

31:30
play
645138314

100+

2.5 K+

116:38
play
631204561

400+

8.9 K+

50:35
play
646000705

200+

4.7 K+

117:35
play
330422025

100+

3.9 K+

42:42
play
9864150

3.2 K+

63.3 K+

25:53
play
330421996

200+

4.5 K+

42:00
play
255248517

100+

3.9 K+

38:32
play
642945348

93

200+

131:19
play
69520799

8.8 K+

11.6 K+

36:14

Very Important Questions

Latest Questions

Class 12th

Electrochemistry

Class 12th

Electrochemistry

Class 12th

Electrochemistry

Class 12th

Electrochemistry

Class 12th

Electrochemistry

Class 12th

Electrochemistry

Class 12th

Electrochemistry

Class 12th

Electrochemistry

Class 12th

Electrochemistry

Class 12th

Electrochemistry

bottom open in app
By using this site you agree to the use of cookies. Check our Cookie Policy for more details