Class 12
CHEMISTRY
Surface Chemistry

Langmuir Isotherm

check-circle

Answer

Step by step solution by experts to help you in doubt clearance & scoring excellent marks in exams.

Updated On: 11-5-2020

Apne doubts clear karein ab Whatsapp par bhi. Try it now.
CLICK HERE

Loading DoubtNut Solution for you

Watch 1000+ concepts & tricky questions explained!

37.0 K+

1.8 K+

check-circle

Text Solution

Solution :
<h1><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:16pt"><span style="color:#2f5496"><strong>Langmuir Isotherm</strong></span></span></span></h1> <h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#2f5496"><strong>What is Adsorption Isotherm?</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">Adsorption isotherms have been critical to researches managing ecological protection and adsorption techniques. The two essential methods used for anticipating the adsorption limit of a given material are known as the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">An adsorption isotherm is a graph that expresses the difference in the measure of adsorbate(x) that is adsorbed on the adsorbent surface with the change in pressure at a constant temperature.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt"><img alt="Adsorption isotherms " src="https://d10lpgp6xz60nq.cloudfront.net/engagement_framework/084DAA48-4EAD-350D-EE36-B1722D5863FA.webp" style="width:100%" /></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#2f5496"><strong>Understanding Adsorption Isotherm</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">Adsorption is the adhesion of an adsorbate such as a liquid, fluid, or gas, by making a slim layer or film on the surface of an adsorbent whether it is solid or fluid. The bonding between adsorbate and adsorbent could be physical or chemical bonding. The chemical bonding provides stronger bonding than physical bonding, and the film may be single or various layers. Adsorbate can be separated from the adsorbent, and the process is called desorption. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">There are some factors affecting the adsorption process; at the same time, at the basic level, the most generally studied is the impact of temperature and could be assumed as a monolayer. The adsorption process is usually studied at a given temperature and perceived as an adsorption isotherm</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">As we are aware of Le Chatelier&#39;s rule, the direction of equilibrium in a reaction shifts toward the path in which stress is diminished. So, here we can see an endless supply of excess pressure on the system, the equilibrium shifts toward the path where the quantity of molecules decreases so that the pressure in the system decreases. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">We can see in the graph that subsequent to achieving a pressure Ps, that is the saturation pressure, the change in the measure of adsorbent holding fast to the adsorbate becomes zero. This happens because the surface area accessible for adsorption is constrained, and as all the sites are involved, a further increase in pressure does not cause any distinction.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><strong>Different adsorption isotherms have been suggested by different scientists, namely, Langmuir isotherm, BET theory Freundlich isotherm. Here we will focus on only Langmuir isotherm.</strong></span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#2f5496"><strong>Langmuir isotherm</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">In 1916, Irving Langmuir published another model isotherm for gases adsorbed to solids, which held his name. It is a semi-accurate isotherm got from a proposed active mechanism. This isotherm was based on various assumptions, out of which on one assumption is that dynamic equilibrium occurs between adsorbed gaseous molecules and the free gaseous molecules. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">The four assumptions of Langmuir adsorption isotherm are: </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">I) The adsorbent surface is uniform; that is, all the adsorption sites are analogous. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">ii) Adsorbed molecules don&#39;t collaborate. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">iii) All adsorption occurs through the same mechanism. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">iv) At the greatest adsorption, just a monolayer is formed: molecules of adsorbate don&#39;t deposit on other molecules of adsorbate, just on the free surface of the adsorbent.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">The Langmuir adsorption isotherms foresee linear adsorption at low adsorption densities and a most extreme surface inclusion at higher solute metal concentrations. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">The Langmuir adsorption isotherm has the form: </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">X/M = abc(l + air conditioning) </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">Here, </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">&agrave;X is the solute weight adsorbed by M grams of solid, </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">&agrave;C is solute concentration at the equilibrium point, </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">a and b are constants 1/a equates the concentration when 1/2 of the available adsorption sites. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">The Langmuir adsorption is relevant for monolayer adsorption onto a homogeneous surface when no association occurs between adsorbed species. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">Langmuir indicated that adsorption takes place through this mechanism:</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><img alt="mechanism" src="https://d10lpgp6xz60nq.cloudfront.net/engagement_framework/EB5B5599-265C-6148-D86A-EB845B3934E1.webp" style="height:150px; width:280px" /></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">here,</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">AB - Adsorbed gaseous molecule</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">A(g) - Unadsorbed gaseous molecule </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">B(s) - Unoccupied metal surface</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">The direct and inverse rate constants are k and k<sup>-1</sup> </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">Based on his hypothesis, Langmuir deduced a condition which clarified the relationship between the number of active sites of the surface experiencing adsorption and pressure. This condition is called Langmuir condition.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><img alt="" src="https://d10lpgp6xz60nq.cloudfront.net/engagement_framework/4A8E37F2-70E5-DBAE-4537-B556C96B64AD.webp" style="height:94px; width:152px" /></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">here,</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">&Theta; - the number of sites of the surface which are secured with gaseous particle, </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">P - pressure </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">K - is the equilibrium constant for the distribution of adsorbate between the surface and the gas phase. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">The basic restriction of Langmuir adsorption condition is that it is substantial at low pressure as it were. At lower pressure, KP is so little, that factor (1+KP) in the denominator can almost be disregarded. So, Langmuir condition reduces to denominator is about equivalent to KP. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">Langmuir condition is reduced to the following :</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><img alt="" src="https://d10lpgp6xz60nq.cloudfront.net/engagement_framework/4A8E37F2-70E5-DBAE-4537-B556C96B64AD.webp" style="height:94px; width:152px" /></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">ϴ = KP</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><strong>Related videos:</strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer-chemistry/what-is-adsorption-isotherm-distinguish-between-frundlich-adsorption-isotherm-and-langmuir-adsorptio-30711277" style="color:#0563c1; text-decoration:underline"><span style="font-size:11.5pt">What is adsorption isotherm? Distinguish between Frundlich adsorption isotherm and Langmuir adsorption isotherm</span></a></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer-chemistry/list-four-applications-of-adsorption-11045388" style="color:#0563c1; text-decoration:underline"><span style="font-size:11.5pt">Applications Of Adsorption</span></a></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer-chemistry/langmuir-adsorption-isotherm-is-best-suitable-for-12659914" style="color:#0563c1; text-decoration:underline"><span style="font-size:11.5pt">Langmuir adsorption isotherm is best suitable for</span></a></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer-chemistry/langmuir-adsorption-isotherm-works-particularly-well--30711788" style="color:#0563c1; text-decoration:underline"><span style="font-size:11.5pt">Langmuir adsorption isotherm works particularly well:</span></a></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer-chemistry/at-the-high-pressure-langmuir-adsorption-isotherm-takes-the-form-46827509" style="color:#0563c1; text-decoration:underline"><span style="font-size:11.5pt">At high pressure ,Langmuir adsorption isotherm takes the form</span></a></span></span></li> </ul> <h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#2f5496"><strong>Langmuir Adsorption Prediction</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">The Langmuir-adsorption model forecasts an asymptotic way to deal with monolayer surface inclusion as adsorbate partial pressure approaches saturation. The Langmuir model, however, demonstrated for some ultraclean, all around requested surfaces communicating with small-atom adsorbates, is oversimplified for some true systems. Nonetheless, it is the establishment after which quite a bit of adsorption hypothesis is constructed and as such, provides a reasonable calculated basis for understanding the process. For sure, a significant number of the other adsorption models plot underneath treat the first monolayer as Langmuirian, at that point simply add on further standing to illustrate the adsorption of subsequent layers.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">For adsorption to conclude at one monolayer, the inclination for mass condensation of the adsorbate must be small under the selected test conditions of temperature and pressure. Thus, &quot;unadulterated&quot; Langmuir-type conduct, in which there is no detectable adsorption past the first monolayer, is most frequently observed for species that strongly chemisorb onto a substrate. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">The central thermodynamic assumption that characterizes the Langmuir model is that the chemical activity the surface-bound adsorbate is relative to the division of involved surface sites, (&theta;).</span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#2f5496"><strong>Conditions for applying the Langmuir adsorption </strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">&bull; All adsorption sites must be comparable regardless of whether we take a gander at the absolute first or the last adsorbing molecule: All have the same restricting energy to the surface, and consequently, there is no inclusion reliance of the heat of adsorption. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">&bull; The adsorption limit is strictly restricted to one and only one monolayer. Adsorption into multilayers is prevented. The Langmuir model is very restricted and seldom relevant for handy purposes &ndash; the inclusion reliance of the heat of adsorption must be considered as well as the possibility that something beyond a single monolayer will adsorb. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt">Various progressively sophisticated isotherms have been created, among others the Temkin isotherm or the BET isotherm. The Temkin isotherm resembles somewhat the Langmuir isotherm aside from that a (direct) decrease of qst with &Theta; is incorporated. Yet, at the same time, the adsorption is restricted to a single monolayer.</span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#2f5496"><strong>Some Common Questions on Langmuir Isotherm</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Q1. What is adsorption?</span></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Ans: </span></strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Adsorption is the phenomenon of adhesion from a gas, fluid or dissolved susbtsance to a layer of atoms, molecules, or ions. This process makes an adsorbent film on the surface of the adsorbent material. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Q2: What is the basis of adsorption?</span></strong><br /> <strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Ans:</span></strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt"> Adsorption is the process of deposition of gas or fluid molecules on a solid surface. &quot;Adsorption&quot; is an established and powerful method for domestic and industrial emanating treatment. The most generally used process of water treatment is &quot;adsorption&quot; to the enacted carbon layer. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Q 4. What factors affect adsorption?</span></strong><br /> <strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Ans: </span></strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Factors affecting adsorption include substratum temperature, level of saturation, pore-volume, kind of sub-atomic sieve, sort of adsorbent, and exclusive substratum surface area. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Q5. What is the impact of temperature on adsorption?</span></strong><br /> <strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Ans: </span></strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt">With an increase in temperature, the adsorption potential increased. The adsorption capacity of an adsorbent increases with temperature because the absorption of colour increases with the increase in temperature. After all, colour molecules can acquire sufficient energy to cooperate with the active site on the substrate.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><strong>Important Chapters:</strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/chemistry-ncert-solutions" style="color:#0563c1; text-decoration:underline">NCERT&nbsp;Solutions for&nbsp;Chemistry</a></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/chemistry-ncert-solutions/class-12-chemistry-chapter-6-surface-chemistry-1" style="color:#0563c1; text-decoration:underline">NCERT Solution for Class 12 Chemistry Chapter Surface Chemistry</a></span></span></span></li> </ul>

check-circle

Image Solution

Find answer in image to clear your doubt instantly:

Related Videos

play
30711277

2.8 K+

57.5 K+

2:35
play
12659914

1.8 K+

36.7 K+

0:57
play
69119740

1.7 K+

34.4 K+

play
30711788

1.7 K+

34.9 K+

1:53
play
12660157

3.5 K+

70.6 K+

1:36
play
46827509

14.6 K+

61.0 K+

1:24
play
46827503

900+

18.4 K+

1:36
play
30548453

2.5 K+

49.3 K+

1:24
play
30711698

1.6 K+

32.0 K+

2:09
play
12659908

1.4 K+

27.9 K+

1:56
play
23585953

300+

7.4 K+

play
46827529

2.7 K+

54.6 K+

1:56
play
30548385

8.9 K+

9.8 K+

1:17
play
30548321

3.0 K+

59.4 K+

1:13
play
95416016

300+

7.9 K+

1:48

Very Important Questions

Latest Questions

Class 12th

Surface Chemistry

Class 12th

Surface Chemistry

Class 12th

Surface Chemistry

Class 12th

Surface Chemistry

Class 12th

Surface Chemistry

Class 12th

Surface Chemistry

Class 12th

Surface Chemistry

Class 12th

Surface Chemistry

Class 12th

Surface Chemistry

Class 12th

Surface Chemistry

bottom open in app
By using this site you agree to the use of cookies. Check our Cookie Policy for more details