Home

>

English

>

Class 12

>

Chemistry

>

Chapter

>

Electrochemistry

>

HOW TO CALCULATE EMF OF CELL?...

HOW TO CALCULATE EMF OF CELL?

check-circle

Answer

Step by step solution by experts to help you in doubt clearance & scoring excellent marks in exams.

Updated On: 13-6-2020

Apne doubts clear karein ab Whatsapp par bhi. Try it now.
CLICK HERE

Loading DoubtNut Solution for you

Watch 1000+ concepts & tricky questions explained!

141.1 K+

14.6 K+

check-circle

Text Solution

Solution :
<h1><span style="font-size:16pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri Light&quot;,sans-serif"><span style="color:#2e74b5"><strong><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">How to Calculate EMF of a Cell</span></strong></span></span></span></h1> <h2><strong><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0">What is Electromotive Force (EMF)?</span></span></span></strong></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">The electromotive power (EMF) is the highest potential difference between two electrodes of a galvanic or voltaic cell. This amount is identified with the tendency of an atom to accept (gain) or release (lose) electrons. For instance, the most extreme potential among Zn and Cu of a notable cell has been measured to be 1.100 V. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Zn(s)&nbsp; | Zn2+(1M)&nbsp; ||&nbsp; Cu2+(1M)&nbsp; |&nbsp; Cu(s)</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">In an ideal solution, a concentration of 1 M is characterized as the typical condition, and 1.100 V is the standard electromotive power, Eo, or standard cell potential for the Zn&minus;Cu galvanic cell.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><img alt="salt bridge" src="https://d10lpgp6xz60nq.cloudfront.net/engagement_framework/596FC4CC-7725-200B-C14F-31E8C1523D73.webp" style="width:100%" /></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">The standard cell potential of a galvanic cell can be assessed from the standard reduction potentials of the two half cells. The reduction potentials are evaluated against the standard hydrogen anode (SHE): </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Pt(s) | H<sub>2</sub>(g,1.0atm)&nbsp; |&nbsp; H+(1.0M) </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Its reduction potential or oxidation potential is characterized to be actually zero.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><img alt="" src="https://d10lpgp6xz60nq.cloudfront.net/engagement_framework/818C8405-D240-67D3-1B09-0DB04812149C.webp" style="width:100%" /></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">The reduction potentials of all other half-cells calculated in volts regarding the SHE are the difference in potential energy (electrical) for each coulomb of charge. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Unit for energy, J = coulomb volt, </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Gibbs free energy (G) is the result potential difference( E) and of charge (q)</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">G ( in J) = q E (in C V) &nbsp;for electric energy computations.</span></span></span></p> <h2><strong><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0">Standard Cell Potential&nbsp; of Galvanic Cells</span></span></span></strong></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">A galvanic cell has two half-cells. The galvanic cell convention of writing is to put the (reduction) cathode on the right side, and the (oxidation) anode on the left side. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Pt|H2|H+&nbsp; ||&nbsp; Zn<sup>2+</sup>|Zn</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">For instance, the cell comprises the reduction and oxidation reactions:</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">H2&nbsp; &rarr;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 2e&minus;&nbsp; +&nbsp; 2H+&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; anode (oxidation) reaction</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Zn<sup>2+ </sup>+ 2e&minus;&nbsp; &rarr; Zn&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; cathode (reduction) reaction</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">On the off chance that the concentrations of H+ and Zn<sup>2+</sup> ions are 1.0 M and the pressure of H<sub>2</sub> is 1.0 atm, the voltage difference between the two electrodes would be - 0.763 V(the Zn cathode being the negative terminal). The conditions specified above are known as the standard conditions and the EMF so acquired is the standard reduction potential of the cell.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">The above cell representation is in reverse order in comparison with that given in numerous textbooks; however, this orientation indicates the standard reduction potentials directly, because the Zn half cell is a reduction half-cell. The negative voltage suggests that the reverse chemical reaction is spontaneous. This corresponds to the way that Zn metal reacts with an acid to deliver H2 gas. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">As another model, the cell represented as&nbsp; Pt|H2|H+&nbsp; ||&nbsp; Cu+|Cu comprises of a reduction reaction and an oxidation reaction.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">H<sub>2 </sub>&nbsp;&rarr; 2e&minus;&nbsp; +&nbsp; 2H+&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; anode reaction</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Cu<sup>2+ </sup>+&nbsp; 2e&minus;&nbsp;&nbsp; &rarr; Cu&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; cathode reaction </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">The standard cell potential is equal to 0.337 V. The positive potential signifies a spontaneous reaction, </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Cu<sup>2+</sup>+ H<sub>2&nbsp; </sub>&rarr; Cu&nbsp; +&nbsp; 2H+&nbsp; </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">In any case, the potential is so small that the reaction is too slow to be in any way observed.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><strong>Related Video:</strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer-chemistry/by-electromotive-force-we-mean--12974374" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Electromotive force</span></a></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer-chemistry/calculate-emf-of-given-cell-at-25c-given-eag-ag-080v-16981663" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Calculate emf of given cell at&nbsp;25</span><span style="font-family:&quot;Cambria Math&quot;,serif">∘</span><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">C</span></a></span></span></li> </ul> <h2><strong><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0">Equations to Calculate EMF</span></span></span></strong></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">There are two primary equations for computing EMF. The most essential definition is the quantity of joules of energy (E) every coulomb of charge (Q) selects as it flows through the cell.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><strong>&epsilon; = E &divide; Q</strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Here </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">&epsilon; <span style="font-family:Wingdings">&agrave;</span> symbol for electromotive power, </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">E <span style="font-family:Wingdings">&agrave;</span> the circuit energy </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Q <span style="font-family:Wingdings">&agrave;</span> the charge of the circuit. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">If the resulting energy and the measure of charge passing through the cell is given, then it is the simplest method to compute EMF; however, you won&#39;t have that information often. </span></span></span></p> <h2><strong><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0">Find EMF by the formula:</span></span></span></strong></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><strong>&epsilon; = V + Ir</strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Here </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">V <span style="font-family:Wingdings">&agrave;</span> the voltage of the cell</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">I <span style="font-family:Wingdings">&agrave;</span> the current in the circuit </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">r <span style="font-family:Wingdings">&agrave;</span> the inside resistance of the cell.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">&nbsp;It can also be written and used in the form of Ohm&#39;s law (V = IR). </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">On comparing Ohm&#39;s law with EMF equation, it can be written as: </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><strong>&epsilon; = I (R + r)</strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Here</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">I <span style="font-family:Wingdings">&agrave;</span> current </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">R <span style="font-family:Wingdings">&agrave;</span> resistance of the circuit </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">R <span style="font-family:Wingdings">&agrave;</span> the inner resistance of the cell.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">&nbsp;The similarity of two equations (a) &amp; (b) mentioned below</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">&epsilon; = IR + Ir &hellip;. (a)</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">= V + Ir &hellip;. (b)</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">shows that you can compute the EMF in the event that the voltage across the terminals and the current flowing and the interior resistance of the cell are given. </span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong>Steps to Calculate EMF</strong></span></span></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><strong>Sample Problem 1: </strong>If there is a circuit with a potential difference of 3.2 V, current of 0.6 A flowing with the internal battery resistance at 0.5 ohms. Find the EMF of the cell.&nbsp; </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><strong>Sol 1: </strong>Given: V= 3.2 V</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">I= 0.6A</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">r= 0.5 ohms</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">We know that, &epsilon; = V + Ir </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Putting the given values in the above formula, we get:</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">= 3.2 V + 0.6 A &times; 0.5 &Omega; </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">= 3.2 V + 0.3 V = 3.5 V </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">So the EMF of the circuit is 3.5 V.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">The above example shows how to compute the EMF of the cell using standard reduction potentials. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><strong>Sample Problem 2</strong>: Calculate the emf of a cell (under standard conditions) in which Zinc metal combines with an acid to yield Zinc ions and hydrogen gas? </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><strong>Sol 2:</strong> The first step is to write the half-cell reactions as one-electron reductions R: </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">If the cell isn&#39;t depicted, assign right- and left-hand reactions randomly</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><strong>R</strong>: H<sup> +</sup> + e- &rarr; &frac12; H<sub>2</sub> (g) &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;E<sup>o</sup>=0 V (as per definition) </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><strong>L</strong>:&nbsp; &frac12; Zn<sup>2+</sup> &nbsp;+ e &nbsp;= Zn (s) &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;E<sup>o</sup> = - 0.76V </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Since the EMF is an intensive property; therefore,&nbsp; it does not depend upon the amount of material is reacting. If we divide the reduction equation by some number, as done in the second equation above, the emf does not get change.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Cell emf is E<sup>o</sup> right &ndash; E<sup>o </sup>left</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Thus, (R &ndash; L)&nbsp; <span style="font-family:Wingdings">&agrave;</span> H<sup>+ </sup>(aq) +&nbsp; &frac12; Zn (s) = &frac12; H<sub>2</sub> (g) + &frac12; Zn<sup>2+</sup> (aq)</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><strong>&nbsp;EMF of cell</strong> =<strong> + 0.76V.</strong> </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><strong>Sample Problem 3</strong>:: Calculate EMF of the cell for the reaction between Zn and Fe3+ / Fe2+ </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><strong>&nbsp;Sol 3: </strong>As the steps followed in the previous problem, </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">We first write right- and left-hand reactions randomly</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><strong>R</strong>: Fe<sup>3+ </sup>(aqueous) + e- (aqueous) = Fe2+ (aqueous)&hellip;..E<sup>o</sup>= + 0.77V</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><strong>&nbsp;L</strong>: &frac12; Zn2+ (aq) + e - (aq) = &frac12; Zn (s)&hellip;. .E<sup>o</sup> = - 0.76V </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Since the EMF is an intensive property; therefore,&nbsp; it does not depend upon the amount of material is reacting. If we divide the reduction equation by some number, as done in the second equation above, the emf does not get change.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Cell emf is E<sup>o</sup> right &ndash; E<sup>o </sup>left</span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">(R &ndash; L): Fe <sup>3+</sup> (aq) + &frac12; Zn (s) = Fe<sup>2+</sup> (aq) + &frac12; Zn<sup>2+</sup> (aq).... </span></span></span></li> </ul> <p><span style="color:#000000"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">EMF of cell</span></span></strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif"> = +0.77 &ndash; (- 0.76) <strong>= + 1.53V</strong> </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><strong><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Important Chapters:</span></strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/chemistry-ncert-solutions" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">NCERT&nbsp;Solutions for&nbsp;Chemistry</a></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/chemistry-ncert-solutions/class-12-chemistry-chapter-4-electrochemistry-exercise-1" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">NCERT Solution for Class 12 Chemistry Chapter Electrochemistry</a></span></span></li> </ul>

check-circle

Image Solution

Find answer in image to clear your doubt instantly:

Related Videos

play
17237787

4.9 K+

48.9 K+

2:19
play
16981663

1.7 K+

33.0 K+

3:07
play
11965131

3.0 K+

59.1 K+

3:02
play
74449566

2.1 K+

41.0 K+

play
17960938

1.2 K+

23.6 K+

play
34966454

1.9 K+

37.9 K+

3:26
play
12298002

8.3 K+

166.6 K+

7:32
play
12978689

900+

19.8 K+

2:01
play
30684473

4.9 K+

98.9 K+

3:35
play
13165931

1.4 K+

28.2 K+

1:50
play
14158261

3.6 K+

71.0 K+

3:45
play
18252233

5.0 K+

99.9 K+

play
14158223

2.2 K+

44.1 K+

3:38
play
69119432

600+

13.4 K+

play
12297993

2.8 K+

56.3 K+

6:53

Very Important Questions

Latest Questions

Class 12th

Electrochemistry

Class 12th

Electrochemistry

Class 12th

Electrochemistry

Class 12th

Electrochemistry

Class 12th

Electrochemistry

Class 12th

Electrochemistry

Class 12th

Electrochemistry

Class 12th

Electrochemistry

Class 12th

Electrochemistry

Class 12th

Electrochemistry

bottom open in app
By using this site you agree to the use of cookies. Check our Cookie Policy for more details