Home

>

English

>

Class 12

>

Chemistry

>

Chapter

>

Electrochemistry

>

Electrochemical Series...

Electrochemical Series

check-circle

Answer

Step by step solution by experts to help you in doubt clearance & scoring excellent marks in exams.

Updated On: 12-6-2020

Apne doubts clear karein ab Whatsapp par bhi. Try it now.
CLICK HERE

Loading DoubtNut Solution for you

Watch 1000+ concepts & tricky questions explained!

128.6 K+

17.9 K+

check-circle

Text Solution

Solution :
<h1><span style="font-size:16pt"><span style="color:#2f5496"><strong>Electrochemical Series</strong></span></span></h1> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">The electrochemical series, otherwise called the activity series, is a list of metals arranged by diminishing reactivity or arranged by diminishing ease of oxidation. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">The metals at the highest point of the series, for example, the alkali metals and the alkaline earth metals, are more reactive or are most effortlessly oxidised than the metals found at the base of the series. This fundamentally implies they can react all the more effectively to form chemical compounds. These particular metals that are at the top of the electrochemical/activity series are called active metals.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">The metals at the base of the electrochemical series, for example, the transition metals, are truly steady and stable.&nbsp; They form chemical compounds less readily. These metals, for example, copper and gold, are utilised to make coins and adornments and are called noble metals owing to their low reactivity. The metals in the electrochemical series are placed according to their standard electrode potentials.&nbsp; </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">Electrode potential is the electric potential of a cell having an electrode behaving as a cathode and the standard hydrogen anode (SHE) going about as the anode. Reduction occurs at the cathode, and oxidation takes place at the anode.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">The electrochemical series can be utilized to anticipate the results of reactions among metals and either metal acids or salts. The ions of the particular elements (to be discussed below) can oxidise metals. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black"><img alt="" src="https://d10lpgp6xz60nq.cloudfront.net/engagement_framework/2C83FCBB-F3EC-04BE-654B-3C362DFA15C8.webp" style="width:100%" /></span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#2f5496"><strong>Some Application of Electrochemical Series</strong></span></span></h2> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#2f5496"><strong>1. Determination of Standard EMF (E<sup>0</sup>) of an Electrochemical Cell</strong></span></span></h2> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">The E<sup>o</sup> of the cell is the sum of the standard reduction potential: oxidation half cell and reduction half cell</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">E<sup>o</sup><sub>cell</sub>&nbsp;= E<sup>o</sup><sub>oxidation</sub>&nbsp;+ E<sup>o</sup><sub>reduction</sub></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">E<sup>o</sup><sub>oxidation</sub> is always represented as reduction potential.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">Thus,&nbsp; E<sup>o</sup><sub>oxidation</sub> = &ndash; E<sup>o</sup><sub>reduction</sub></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">It implies, </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">E<sup>o</sup><sub>cell</sub>&nbsp; = ( E<sup>o</sup><sub>reduction</sub> of reduction half cell) &ndash; ( E<sup>o</sup><sub>reduction</sub> of oxidation half cell)</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">When oxidation occurs at anode and reduction occurs at the cathode. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">Thus, E<sup>o</sup><sub>cell</sub>&nbsp;= E<sup>o</sup><sub>cathode</sub>&nbsp;&ndash;&nbsp;E<sup>o</sup><sub>anode</sub></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">Example:</span></span></strong></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">Consider a reaction, 2Ag<sup>+</sup>&nbsp;+ Cd &rarr; 2Ag + Cd<sup>+2</sup>(aq)</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">E<sup>o</sup><sub>reduction</sub> is expressed as: Ag+/ Ag = 0.80 volt, Cd<sup>+2/</sup> Cd = - 0.40 volt</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">From the reaction, we can deduce that Cd losses electron and Ag+ accepts. So, oxidation half cell or anode is Cd.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">We know, E<sup>o</sup><sub>cell</sub>&nbsp;= E<sup>o</sup><sub>cathode</sub>&nbsp;&ndash;&nbsp;E<sup>o</sup><sub>anode</sub></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;=0.80 -(-0.40)</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;= 1.20 volt</span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#2f5496"><strong>2. To predict the relative oxidizing and reducing powers</strong></span></span></h2> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:#212529">The electrochemical series assists with selecting substances that are effective oxidizing species and those which are good reducing agents. In an electrochemical series, the species which are set above hydrogen are progressively hard for reduction and their standard reduction potential qualities are negative. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:#212529">The Li : Li+ (aq) cathode has the least E<sup>o</sup> number and along these lines, it is reduced with more efforts. Thusly, Li+ can&#39;t gain electrons readily; it loses electrons to act as a reducing species. Lithium is the strongest reducing agent.</span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#2f5496"><strong>&nbsp;3. Predicting the Feasibility of Redox Reaction</strong></span></span></h2> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">Any redox reaction would occur spontaneously if the free energy change (&Delta;G) is negative. The free energy is related to cell emf in the following manner:</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">&Delta;G<sup>o</sup>&nbsp;= nFE<sup>o</sup></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">Where n represents the number of electrons engaged in the reaction, F denotes the Faraday constant and E<sup>o</sup>&nbsp;is the cell&nbsp;emf.&nbsp;</span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="color:black">In the case when E<sup>o</sup>&nbsp;is positive, the cell reaction is spontaneous and serves as a source of electrical energy.</span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="color:black">if E<sup>o</sup>&nbsp;is positive, then &Delta;G<sup>o&nbsp;</sup>can be negative.</span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="color:black">If it comes out to be negative then the spontaneous reaction cannot take place.</span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="color:black">The resultant value of&nbsp; E<sup>o</sup>&nbsp;for redox reaction is important in predicting the stability of a metal salt solution when stored in another metal container.</span></span></span></li> </ul> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#2f5496"><strong>Examples</strong></span></span></h2> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#2f5496"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">1. Determine whether the reaction will occur spontaneously:</span></span></strong></span></span></h2> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">Fe+3&nbsp;+ 2Cl&ndash;</span></span></strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">&nbsp;&rarr;&nbsp;<strong>Fe+2&nbsp;+ Cl<sub>2</sub></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">E<sup>0</sup>Cl / Cl &ndash;= 1.36 volt</span></span></strong></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">E<sup>0</sup>Fe+2/Fe</span></span></strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">&nbsp;<strong>= -0.440 volt </strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">Sol-</span></span></strong></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">E<sup>o</sup><sub>cell</sub>&nbsp;= E<sup>o</sup><sub>cathode</sub>&nbsp;&ndash;&nbsp;E<sup>o</sup><sub>anode</sub></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">Since chlorine has higher reduction potential than iron therefore at cathode reduction of chlorine occurs and oxidation of iron occurs at the anode.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">E<sup>o</sup><sub>cell</sub>&nbsp;=&nbsp;1.36 -(-0.440) =&nbsp;1.80 volts</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">The positive value of E<sup>0</sup>Cell&nbsp;implies that reaction occurs spontaneously.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">2. The standard reduction potential at 25<sup>0</sup>C for the half-reaction are mentioned</span></span></strong></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">Fe+3&nbsp;+ e&ndash;&nbsp;&rarr; Fe+2&nbsp; ;&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;0.77 volt</span></span></strong></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">Cr+3&nbsp;(aq) + 3e&ndash;&rarr; Cr(s);&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;-0.740 volt</span></span></strong></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">Zn+2(aq) + 2e&ndash;&nbsp;&rarr; Zn(s); &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;-0.76 volt</span></span></strong></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">Cu+2(aq) + 2e&ndash;&nbsp;&rarr; Cu(s);&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;0.34 volt</span></span></strong></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">Which is the strongest reducing agent</span></span></strong></span></p> <ol> <li><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><strong><span style="color:black">Fe+3</span></strong></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><strong><span style="color:black">Cr</span></strong></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="color:black">Zn</span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><strong><span style="color:black">Cu</span></strong></span></span></li> </ol> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">Sol- Zn</span></span></strong></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">As we know, reducing agent tends to lose electron,&nbsp; so it is oxidised. Out of the given half-reaction, the reduction of Zn+2&nbsp;has the lowest reduction potential(-0.762). We know that</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">Oxidation&nbsp; potential = -(reduction potential)</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">With regard to standard oxidation potential, Zinc will have the highest oxidation potential (0.762 volts). Therefore, zinc is the strongest reducing agent.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">3. The standard oxidation potential, E0&nbsp;for the half-reactions are as follows,</span></span></strong></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">Fe&nbsp;</span></span></strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">&rarr;&nbsp;<strong>Fe<sup>+2</sup>&nbsp;+ 2e&ndash; &nbsp;&nbsp;; E<sup>0</sup>&nbsp;= 0.41 volt</strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">Cu&nbsp;</span></span></strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">&rarr;&nbsp;<strong>Cu<sup>+2</sup>&nbsp;+ 2e&ndash;&nbsp;;&nbsp; E<sup>0</sup>&nbsp;= -0.34 volt</strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">Find the emf,&nbsp; Cu<sup>+2</sup>&nbsp;+ Fe&nbsp;</span></span></strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">&rarr;&nbsp;<strong>Cu + Fe<sup>+2</sup></strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">Sol-&nbsp;</span></span></strong></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">E<sup>o</sup><sub>cell</sub>&nbsp; = ( E<sup>o</sup><sub>reduction</sub> of reduction half cell) &ndash; ( E<sup>o</sup><sub>reduction</sub> of oxidation half cell)</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">E<sup>o</sup><sub>cell<strong>&nbsp;</strong></sub>= -( E<sup>o</sup><sub>oxidation</sub> of reduction half cell) &ndash; (-E<sup>o</sup><sub>oxidation</sub> of oxidation half cell)</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">E<sup>o</sup><sub>cell<strong>&nbsp;</strong></sub>= -0.34-(-0.41)</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="color:black">E<sup>o</sup><sub>cell<strong>&nbsp;</strong></sub>= 0.07 volt.</span></span></span></p>

check-circle

Image Solution

Find answer in image to clear your doubt instantly:

Related Videos

play
96607219

600+

12.7 K+

2:39
play
9864148

17.9 K+

128.6 K+

20:05
play
91188211

800+

17.6 K+

2:39
play
11046512

19.4 K+

30.6 K+

1:16
play
60006643

2.3 K+

15.9 K+

play
34507692

900+

18.5 K+

1:55
play
34507681

1.9 K+

15.1 K+

1:42
play
96607352

200+

5.5 K+

play
12976228

500+

10.1 K+

1:49
play
11480542

1.8 K+

36.5 K+

1:09
play
60006662

1.1 K+

22.9 K+

play
43956878

500+

10.6 K+

play
43956963

800+

16.1 K+

play
96607351

2.4 K+

4.3 K+

play
23690588

1.8 K+

36.0 K+

2:19

Very Important Questions

Latest Questions

Class 12th

Electrochemistry

Class 12th

Electrochemistry

Class 12th

Electrochemistry

Class 12th

Electrochemistry

Class 12th

Electrochemistry

Class 12th

Electrochemistry

Class 12th

Electrochemistry

Class 12th

Electrochemistry

Class 12th

Electrochemistry

Class 12th

Electrochemistry

bottom open in app
By using this site you agree to the use of cookies. Check our Cookie Policy for more details