logo
search
search
user
login
Login

Home

>

English

>

Class 12

>

Chemistry

>

Chapter

>

Chemical Kinetics

>

Derivation...

Derivation

check-circle

Answer

Step by step solution by experts to help you in doubt clearance & scoring excellent marks in exams.

Updated On: 20-4-2020

Apne doubts clear karein ab Whatsapp par bhi. Try it now.
CLICK HERE

Loading DoubtNut Solution for you

Watch 1000+ concepts & tricky questions explained!

63.9 K+

3.2 K+

check-circle

Text Solution

Solution :
<h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#2f5496"><strong>First Order Reactions</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:black">In this article, we will discuss first-order reactions by using the mathematical descriptions of these reactions to know more about their behavior.</span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#2f5496"><strong>What is Chemical Kinetics?</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">The branch of chemistry that focuses on the rate of chemical reaction, factors affecting the rate and the mechanism of a reaction is known as Chemical Kinetics.</span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#2f5496"><strong>Reaction Rates</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">In what manner would scientists be able to use uranium deposits to figure out the age of the earth? Nobody was alive in those days - there weren&rsquo;t even microscopic organisms! All things considered, it turns out the radioactive decay of Uranium-238 is entirely predictable. It can be described numerically, using first-order reactions.</span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#2f5496"><strong>Rate of Reaction Definition</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">The rate of a chemical reaction is the change in concentration of any one of the reactant or product in a given time. It can also be said that the rate of increase in the concentration of any one of the products or the rate of decrease in the concentration of the reactants.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">The rate of reaction is the speed at which a chemical reaction continues to form the product. We characterize this numerically by measuring the rate at which reactants concentration decreases or products are formed, where the rate is characterized as a subsidiary with respect to time. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">In this lesson, we&rsquo;re focusing on first-order reactions. Because first-order reaction rates just rely upon the concentration of one reactant, we can characterize the rate of these reactions as the rate of disappearance of ta particular reactant.</span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>The first-order reactions depend only on the concentration of one reactant.</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><img alt="first-order reactions " src="https://d10lpgp6xz60nq.cloudfront.net/engagement_framework/34D92FAC-6823-735B-206C-9810C07A6A02.webp" style="height:100px; width:270px" /></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px">In this expression, the square brackets denote concentration, so A in square brackets is the concentration of reactant A. The negative sign indicates that the concentration is decreasing over time, and&nbsp;&lsquo;t&rsquo; denotes time.</span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#2f5496"><strong>What is Rate Law?</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Rate laws&nbsp;are equations that mathematically describe the reaction rate. The rate law for a chemical reaction associates the reaction rate with the partial pressures or concentrations of the reactants. If we know which variables determine the rate of reaction, then it allows us to infer useful conclusions about that reaction. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">The rate law relates the reaction rate with the concentrations or partial pressures of the reactants. For the general reaction, aA+bB&rarr;C with no moderate steps in its reaction mechanism, implying that it is a basic reaction, the rate law is expressed as:</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">r=k[A]x [B]y</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">In this equation, as already stated above, that square brackets [A] and [B] represent the concentrations of the reactants A and B, respectively.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">The exponents&nbsp;<em>x</em>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<em>y</em>&nbsp;are determined experimentally; they vary for each reaction. It is to be noted that they are&nbsp;<em>not</em>&nbsp;associated with the stoichiometric coefficients of the chemical equation. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Finally,&nbsp;<em>k</em>&nbsp;is referred to as the rate constant of the reaction. The value of the constant <em>k</em>&nbsp;will vary with factors that affect reaction rate, such as pressure, temperature, surface area, etc. A smaller rate constant tells us that it is a slower reaction, while a larger rate constant means a faster reaction.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Related Videos:</strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer-chemistry/derivation-and-characteristics-9864173" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Derivation And Characteristics</a></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer-chemistry/mechanism-of-a-reaction-9864185" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Mechanism Of A Reaction</a></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer-chemistry/applications-of-mechanism-of-reaction-9864186" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Applications Of Mechanism Of Reaction</a></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer-chemistry/define-molecularity-of-a-reaction-30710866" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Define molecularity of a reaction</a></span></span></li> </ul> <h2><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="color:#2f5496"><strong>First-Order Reactions</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">A first-order reaction is based on the concentration of one reactant. As such, a first-order reaction is sometimes alluded to as a unimolecular reaction. While different reactants can be present, each will be zero-order, since the concentrations of these reactants don&rsquo;t influence the reaction rate. Thus, the rate law for a general reaction that is first order with respect to a reactant A is given by:</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">r= &minus;d[A]/dt = k[A].</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">If the concentration of the reactant &lsquo;A&rsquo; is doubled, the reaction rate doubles; if the concentration of the reactant &lsquo;A&rsquo; is increased by a factor of 5, the reaction rate increases by a factor of 5, and so forth. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">The rate constant &lsquo;<em>k&rsquo;</em>&nbsp; has the units of concentration/time; here, it will be &nbsp;1/s or s<sup>-1</sup>.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:#000000">The dissociation of</span> <a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer-chemistry/hydrogen-peroxide-91188372" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">hydrogen peroxide</a> <span style="color:#000000">to form oxygen and hydrogen is a first-order reaction.</span></span></span></p> <h3><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><img alt="first-order reaction " src="https://d10lpgp6xz60nq.cloudfront.net/engagement_framework/6449298E-71E0-8D83-63E5-9245C43F817A.webp" style="height:170px; width:270px" /></span></span></span></h3> <h3><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Using the Method of Initial Rates to Determine Reaction Order Experimentally</span></span></span></h3> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">2N2O5(g)&rarr;4NO2(g)+O2(g)</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">The decomposition of dinitrogen pentoxide is illustrated above. As we can see that there is only one reactant, thus the rate law for this reaction is given by:</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Rate=k[N<sub>2</sub>O<sub>5</sub>]<sup>m</sup></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">So as to find the general order of the reaction, we have to compute the value of the exponent &lsquo;m&rsquo;. To do this, we can measure an underlying concentration of N2O5 in a flask, and record the rate at which the N2O5 decomposes. We would then be able to run the reaction a second time, however with a different initial concentration of N2O5. At that point, we measure the new reaction rate at which the N2O5 decomposes. By looking at these rates, it is possible for us to discover the order of the reaction.</span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align:justify"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Let us look at an example to determine the order of the reaction and rate constant.</span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align:justify"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Example 1</strong>. <strong>Ethyl chloride yields HCl and ethylene, at high temperatures through the following reaction:</strong></span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align:justify"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>CH3CH</strong><strong>2</strong><strong>Cl(g) &rarr;</strong><strong>&Delta;</strong><strong>HCl(g)+C</strong><strong>2</strong><strong>H4(g)</strong></span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align:justify"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>In the table below is the reaction rate data at 550&deg;C, find the reaction order in regard to the concentration of ethyl chloride, and also determine the rate constant for the particular reaction.</strong></span></span></span></p> <table border="1" cellspacing="0" class="Table" style="border-collapse:collapse; border:1pt solid windowtext; width:100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="background-color:lightgrey"> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>[CH<sub>3</sub>CH</strong><strong><sub>2</sub></strong><strong>Cl]<sub>0</sub>&nbsp;(M)</strong></span></span></span></p> </td> <td style="background-color:lightgrey"> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Initial Rate (M/s)</strong></span></span></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="background-color:#efefef"> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">0.010</span></span></span></p> </td> <td style="background-color:#efefef"> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">1.6 &times; 10<sup>&minus;8</sup></span></span></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">0.015</span></span></span></p> </td> <td> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">2.4 &times; 10<sup>&minus;8</sup></span></span></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="background-color:#efefef"> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">0.030</span></span></span></p> </td> <td style="background-color:#efefef"> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">4.8 &times; 10<sup>&minus;8</sup></span></span></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">0.040</span></span></span></p> </td> <td> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">6.4 &times; 10<sup>&minus;8</sup></span></span></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align:justify"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Solution:</strong> We have been provided with the balanced chemical equation, initial concentrations of CH<sub>3</sub>CH<sub>2</sub>Cl, and initial reaction rates.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">First, we will<strong> </strong>compare the data from two different experiments to find the effect on the rate of reaction of change in the concentration of a reactant species.</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">If we take two experiments, say 2 and 3 shows that doubling the concentration doubles the reaction rate, so the rate of reaction is directly proportional to the concentration of ethyl chloride, [CH<sub>3</sub>CH<sub>2</sub>Cl]. </span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">Now, if we compare experiments 1 and 4, we can see that if the concentration is increased by four times, then it also increases the reaction rate by four times, which reflects that the rate of reaction is proportional to the concentration of ethyl chloride, [CH<sub>3</sub>CH<sub>2</sub>Cl].</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Hence, the reaction is a first-order reaction.</strong></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">In order to calculate the rate constant (<em>k</em>), we can take data from any of the experiments. Selecting Experiment 4 gives the following:</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">6.40 &times; 10<sup>&minus;8</sup>&nbsp;M/s =&nbsp;<em>k</em>(0.040 M)</span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif">1.6 &times; 10<sup>&minus;6</sup>&nbsp;s<sup>&minus;1</sup>&nbsp;=&nbsp;<em>k</em></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><strong>Important Chapters:</strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/chemistry-ncert-solutions" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">NCERT Solution for Chemistry</a></span></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:16px"><span style="font-family:Times New Roman,Times,serif"><span style="color:black"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/chemistry-ncert-solutions/class-12-chemistry-chapter-5-chemical-kinetics-exercise-1" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">NCERT Solution for Chemistry Class 12 Chemical Kinetics</a></span></span></span></li> </ul>

check-circle

Image Solution

Find answer in image to clear your doubt instantly:

Related Videos

play
9864173

1.4 K+

28.2 K+

10:59
play
9864168

1.9 K+

39.0 K+

14:41
play
1339839

7.3 K+

146.2 K+

5:11
play
9864888

55.1 K+

66.9 K+

11:40
play
1339634

2.5 K+

49.1 K+

4:22
play
1339879

2.5 K+

49.8 K+

5:44
play
1340174

6.0 K+

121.0 K+

16:51
play
1340478

6.6 K+

132.6 K+

7:01
play
1339633

2.5 K+

50.4 K+

11:31
play
1339613

12.1 K+

88.3 K+

6:16
play
6774906

123.4 K+

240.0 K+

9:27
play
52410001

3.1 K+

11.2 K+

play
44695306

300+

6.3 K+

6:09
play
32523773

6.3 K+

11.5 K+

play
15635405

1.1 K+

21.2 K+

1:19

Very Important Questions

Latest Questions

Class 12th

Chemical Kinetics

Class 12th

Chemical Kinetics

Class 12th

Chemical Kinetics

Class 12th

Chemical Kinetics

Class 12th

Chemical Kinetics

Class 12th

Chemical Kinetics

Class 12th

Chemical Kinetics

Class 12th

Chemical Kinetics

Class 12th

Chemical Kinetics

Class 12th

Chemical Kinetics

bottom open in app
By using this site you agree to the use of cookies. Check our Cookie Policy for more details