logo
search
search
user
login
Login

Home

>

English

>

Class 12

>

Chemistry

>

Chapter

>

Surface Chemistry

>

Chemisorption...

Chemisorption

check-circle

Answer

Step by step solution by experts to help you in doubt clearance & scoring excellent marks in exams.

Updated On: 11-5-2020

Apne doubts clear karein ab Whatsapp par bhi. Try it now.
CLICK HERE

Loading DoubtNut Solution for you

Watch 1000+ concepts & tricky questions explained!

33.9 K+

1.7 K+

check-circle

Text Solution

Solution :
<h1><span style="font-size:16pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#2f5496"><strong>Chemisorption</strong></span></span></span></h1> <h2><span style="color:#2980b9"><strong><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">What is Chemisorption?</span></span></strong></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Chemisorption is a process of chemical adsorption, caused by a reaction on an exposed surface forming an intramolecular bond between the surface and the adsorbate material. All through the chemical reaction, a distinct chemical species is made on the adsorbent surface, which causes the bond to be made. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Chemisorption is used being developed, checking and measuring of corrosion inhibitors and is used for measuring active surface sites on a substrate.</span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="color:#2980b9"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><strong>Mechanism of Chemisorption</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">It involves the transfer, trade, or sharing of electrons among adsorbents and adsorbates (atoms or molecules), and the adsorption of adsorbents and adsorbates is carried out because of the creation of chemical bonds among them.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Adsorption selectivity focuses on the individual adsorption capacity of adsorbents for some substances because of their specific composition and the structure of the adsorbents. For instance, activated carbon is composed of covalently connected carbon atoms, and can specially adsorb high-sub-atomic weight natural molecules because of its enormous opening. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Chemisorption, for the most part, includes either charge transfer or a charge sharing between a solid metal substrate and an adsorbent, like the corrosion inhibitor molecule. Chemically adsorbed inhibitors on the metal surface meddle with metal dissolution in an electrolyte liquid.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">The effectiveness of chemisorbed organic molecules is based upon</span><strong><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"> s</span></strong><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">olubility, molecular size and capacity to give electrons to the substrate, and the physical adsorption (physisorption), which retains the chemical species within the adsorbate and the substrate surface in its unique condition </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">The chemisorption process involves the formation of strong electronic bonds between certain surface sites, which are known as active surface sites., and the adsorbate molecules.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Chemisorption is irreversible and involves more heat than physical adsorption.</span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="color:#2980b9"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><strong>Importance of Chemisorption in Catalysis</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Chemisorption is a sort of adsorption which involves a chemical reaction between the surface and the adsorbate. New chemical bonds are produced at the adsorbent surface. A significant case of chemisorption is in heterogeneous catalysis, which involves molecules responding with one another through the arrangement of chemisorbed intermediates. After the chemisorbed species consolidate (by framing bonds with one another) the item desorbs from the surface.</span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="color:#2980b9"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><strong>Difference between chemisorption and physical adsorption</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Physical adsorption involves the forces of molecular interaction which implement permanent dipole, induced dipole, and quadruple attraction. For this reason, it is often termed van der Waals adsorption. Chemisorption, on the other hand, involves the rearrangement of the electrons of the interacting gas and solid, with consequential formation and rupture of chemical bonds. Physical adsorption is characterised by enthalpy changes that are small, typically in the range -10 to -40 kJ mol-1 (heats of adsorption of 10- 40 kJ mol<sup>-1</sup> ), whereas heats of chemisorption are rarely less than 80 kJ mol-1 and often exceed 400 kJ mol<sup>-1</sup> .</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><strong><span style="font-size:11.0pt">Related Videos:</span></strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer-chemistry/write-differences-between-physisorption-and-chemisorption-11045497" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">Differences between physisorption and chemisorption</span></span></a></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:12pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/question-answer-chemistry/write-any-two-characteristics-of-chemisorption-20477591" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline"><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif">Characteristics of Chemisorption</span></span></a> </span></span></li> </ul> <h2><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#2980b9"><strong>Chemisorption Methods For Catalyst Evaluation</strong></span><span style="color:#0070c0"><strong> </strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Chemisorption analyses might be applied to decide a catalyst&#39;s relative proficiency in advancing a specific reaction, or used to explore catalyst poisoning and in observing the debasement of synergist action after some time of use.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Isothermal chemisorption studies are carried out by two chemisorption techniques: </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">a) static volumetric chemisorption, </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">b) active (streaming gas) chemisorption. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">The volumetric system is helpful for getting a high-resolution measurement of the chemisorption isotherm from low pressure to atmospheric pressure at effectively any temperature from close to 1000 <sup>o</sup> C or more prominent.</span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="color:#2980b9"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><strong>Pulse Chemisorption</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">A streaming gas method regularly is performed at encompassing pressure. After the sample has been cleansed in the progression of an inactive gas, small quantities of a reactant are infused until the sample is saturated. An aligned warm conductivity finder (TCD) is used to decide the number of reactant molecules taken up by active sites upon every infusion. Beginning injections might be chemisorbed absolutely; upon saturation, none of the later injections will be chemisorbed, demonstrating saturation. The quantity of molecules of gas chemisorbed is legitimately identified with the active surface area of active material. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">The amount of gas chemisorbed per gram of sample joined with the information on the stoichiometry of the reaction, and the amount of active metal blended in with support material during the definition of the catalyst permits the metal dispersion to be determined. This can be a significant marker of the presentation of the catalyst and a significant financial measure of how productively the expensive active metal is being utilised in a catalyst item.</span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="color:#2980b9"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><strong>Non-Isothermal Methods For Describing Catalysts</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><span style="color:#000000">Temperature-Programmed Desorption (TPD), Temperature-Programmed Oxidation (TPO), and Temperature Programmed Reduction (TPR) are three non-isothermal methods for describing catalysts. Temperature-modified desorption commonly does not utilise a vacuum, better-simulating conditions found in certain industrial applications</span><span style="color:black">.</span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="color:#2980b9"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><strong>Temperature-Programmed Desorption (TPD)</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">In the TPD analysis, materials are put in a sample cell and pretreated to clean the active surfaces. Next, a selected gas or vapour is chemisorbed onto the active sites until saturation is accomplished, after which the rest of the molecules are flushed out with a dormant gas. Temperature (vitality) is increased at a controlled rate, while a constant progression of inert gas is kept up over the sample. A warm conductivity indicator observes the dormant gas and any desorbed molecules.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">The TPD signal is relative to the number of molecules desorbed as warm vitality overcomes the coupling vitality. Quantities desorbed at specific temperatures give data about the number, strength, and heterogeneity of the chemisorption sites. </span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="color:#2980b9"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><strong>Temperature-Programmed Oxidation (TPO)</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Temperature-Programmed Oxidation is performed to look at the degree to which a catalyst can be reoxidized. Typically, the sample is pretreated, and the metal oxides are decreased to the base metal. The sample is warmed at a uniform rate as the reactant gas, regularly 2% oxygen, is applied to the sample in pulses or, on the other hand, as a steady stream. The oxidation reaction takes place at a specific temperature, and the resulting take-up of oxygen is measured.</span></span></span></span></p> <h2><span style="color:#2980b9"><span style="font-size:14pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif"><strong>Temperature Programmed Reduction (TPR)</strong></span></span></span></h2> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Temperature Programmed Reduction<strong> </strong>is predominantly used to study the reducibility of species such as metal oxides dispersed on a support. This involves streaming a stream of weakened hydrogen (or another diminishing specialist) over the sample as the sample temperature is increased. </span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">The amount of hydrogen consumed and the temperature profile under which the decrease occurred are measured. A graph of the amount of hydrogen consumed versus temperature can create at least one peaks, and the information got to uncover the number of reduction species in the sample, as well as their activation energies.</span></span></span></span></p> <p><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><strong><span style="font-family:&quot;Times New Roman&quot;,serif">Important Chapters:</span></strong></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/chemistry-ncert-solutions" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">NCERT&nbsp;Solutions for&nbsp;Chemistry</a></span></span></li> <li><span style="font-size:11.0pt"><span style="font-family:&quot;Calibri&quot;,sans-serif"><a href="https://doubtnut.com/chemistry-ncert-solutions/class-12-chemistry-chapter-6-surface-chemistry-1" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">NCERT Solution for Class 12 Chemistry Chapter 12 Surface Chemistry</a></span></span></li> </ul>

check-circle

Image Solution

Find answer in image to clear your doubt instantly:

Related Videos

play
11045693

400+

9.6 K+

2:41
play
16187999

1.1 K+

22.3 K+

2:37
play
94841104

500+

10.2 K+

2:44
play
11045497

3.6 K+

72.5 K+

2:04
play
11045593

1.8 K+

36.4 K+

2:43
play
20477591

3.6 K+

72.4 K+

1:53
play
94841069

2.4 K+

11.6 K+

3:11
play
69119684

6.2 K+

124.2 K+

1:36
play
30711521

2.1 K+

41.1 K+

1:35
play
11045376

6.1 K+

121.2 K+

3:06
play
11045628

12.3 K+

246.6 K+

3:16
play
11045726

900+

19.2 K+

4:09
play
12659921

1.7 K+

34.0 K+

1:30
play
12659920

3.6 K+

72.2 K+

0:57
play
14277881

5.5 K+

109.7 K+

1:43

Very Important Questions

Latest Questions

Class 12th

Surface Chemistry

Class 12th

Surface Chemistry

Class 12th

Surface Chemistry

Class 12th

Surface Chemistry

Class 12th

Surface Chemistry

Class 12th

Surface Chemistry

Class 12th

Surface Chemistry

Class 12th

Surface Chemistry

Class 12th

Surface Chemistry

Class 12th

Surface Chemistry

bottom open in app
By using this site you agree to the use of cookies. Check our Cookie Policy for more details