Doubtnut Promotions Sticky

IONIC EQUILIBRIUM for Class 11 CHEMISTRY

INTRODUCTION

On the basis of conduction of electric current through their solutions, Faraday, in 1824, classified all substances into two categories, viz, electrolytes and non-electrolytes. An electrolyte is defined as a compound whose aqueous solution or melt conducts electricity. On the other hand, a compound whose aqueous solution or melt does not conduct electricity is called a non-electrolyte. For example, aqueous solutions of inorganic acids, bases and salts conduct electricity. Hence, they are electrolytes. On the other hand, aqueous solutions of sugar, urea etc. do not conduct electricity. Hence, they are non-electrolytes. Arrhenius in 1880 explained that the conductance by an electrolyte is due to the presence of ions produced by the dissociation of the substance. However, different electrolytes dissociate to different extents. The fraction of the total number of molecules which dissociates into ions is called the degree of dissociation or degree of ionization and is usually represented by α.
i.e.,

α=No. of Moles DissociatedTotal No. of Moles Taken

Ionic Equilibrium

In chemistry, solutions meh chemical reactions very important role play karte hai. For example, sodium chloride, solid state meh electricity conduct nahi karta. However, jab isse water meh dissolve kara jata hai tab ye good conductor of electricity ban jata hai. Michael Faraday classified the substances into two types : electrolytes and non-electrolytes.
Jo substances apne molten states or in the form of their aqueous solutions meh electricity conduct karte hai unhe electrolytes kaha jata hai. For example, acids, bases and salts are electrolytes. On the other hand, jo substances molten states or in the form of their aqueous solutions meh electricity conduct nahi karte unhe non-electrolytes kaha jata hai. Substances jaise sugar, urea, glycerine, etc., non-electrolytes hote hai. Jab electrolyte water meh dissolve hota hai, tab ye ions meh split up ho jata hai. For example, sodium chloride, solid state meh, collection of positively charged sodium ions (cations) and negatively charged chloride ions (anions) ki tarah exist karta hai. Solid state meh ye strong electrostatic forces of attraction se attached rahte hai. Inn strong attractive forces ki wajah se, ions freely move nahi kar pate aur therefore, ye solid state meh electricity conduct nahi karte.
Jab inn compounds ko water meh dissolve kara jata hai, toh water ka high dielectric constant hone ki wajah se inn ions ke beech forces of attraction ko water cut down kar deta hai. As a result, ions separate ho jati hai aur hence ye water meh dissolve ho jati hai. Ab ek another concept of ionisation bhi hota hai. We know that water ek polar molecule hota hai. As oxygen more electronegative hoti hai than hydrogen, toh oxygen atom some partial negative charge acquire kar leti hai aur hydrogen atoms, positive charge acquire karte hai. Jab ek electrolyte (say NaCl) water meh dissolve hota hai, tab jo polar water molecules hote hai wo khud ko around the ions arrange kar lete hai. Ab water molecules ki arrangement iss tarah hote hai ki positively charged Na+ ions ke around negative poles face karte hai while negatively charged Cl ions ke around, water molecules ke positive poles face karte hai. Ab ye below shown hai,

ocr_image


Ions aur water molecules ke beech forces of attraction ki wajah se, electrostatic forces jo ions ko bind karti hai into a definite arrangement weak ho jati hai. Therefore, crystals se ions free ho jati hai aur ye solution meh drag ho jati hai. Solution meh jo resulting ions hoti hai wo water molecules se surrounded rahti hai aur ab inn ions ko hydrated ions kaha jata hai. Ab water molecules se hua ions ka hydration inn ions ko stabilize karta hai.
Ye forces of attraction between oppositely charged ions, medium ke dielectric constant ke inversely proportional hoti hai. Ab jitna greater dielectric constant hota hai, utni greater solvent ki dissolving power hoti hai. Water ka dielectric constant 80 hota hai aur therefore, ye forces aqueous solution meh by a factor of about 80 reduce ho jati hai aur ions freely move ho jati hai.
Ye found kara gaya hai that sodium chloride almost completely ionise ho jata hai. However, sabhi substances same extent meh ionise nahi hote. Degree of ionisation, polarity aur the strength of the bond and the extent of solvation of the ions formed par depend karti hai. Depending upon the extent of ionisation; electrolytes ko divide kara gaya hai into two classes : strong electrolytes aur weak electrolytes.

(i) Strong Electrolytes
In aqueous solution jo substances ions meh almost completely ionise hote hai unhe strong electrolytes kaha jata hai. For example, HCl,H2SO4,HNO3,NaOH,KOH,NaCl,KNO3, etc., are strong electrolytes.
It may be noted that the equation for the ionisation reactions of strong electrolytes are written with only single headed arrow directed to the right. For example,
HCl+H2OH3O++Cl
HNO3+H2OH3O++NO3

(ii) Weak Electrolytes
In aqueous solution jo substances small extent meh ionise hote hai unhe weak electrolytes kaha jata hai. For example, CH3COOH, NH4OH, (NH4)2CO3, HCN, etc., are weak electrolytes. Inn cases meh, molecules equilibrium meh hote hai with their ions. The ionisation of such electrolytes is written with double headed arrows. For example,
CH3COOH+H2OH3O++CH3COO

Strong electrolytes almost completely ionise ho jate hai. Unionised molecule itni small extent meh present hote hai that ye kisi significance ke nahi hote to study the ionisation constant of strong electrolytes. However, weak electrolytes partially ionise hote hai aur ek dynamic equilibrium establish hota hai after some time between the ions and the unionised molecules. Isse ionic equilibrium kaha jata hai. Thus, ionic equilibrium wo equilibrium hota hai which is established between the unionised molecules and the ions in solution of weak electrolytes.

Ionic Equilibrium

Chemical reactions in solutions play very important role in chemistry. For example, sodium chloride does not conduct electricity in the solid state. However, when it is dissolved in water, it becomes good conductor of electricity. Michael Faraday classified the substances into two types : electrolytes and non-electrolytes.
The substances which conduct electricity in their molten states or in the form of their aqueous solutions are called electrolytes. For example, acids, bases and salts are electrolytes. On the other hand, the substances which do not conduct electricity in the molten states or in the form of their aqueous solutions are called non-electrolytes. The substances like sugar, urea, glycerine, etc., are non-electrolytes. When an electrolyte is dissolved in water, it splits up into ions. For example, sodium chloride in the solid state exists as a collection of positively charged sodium ions (cations) and negatively charged chloride ions (anions). These are held together by strong electrostatic forces of attraction in the solid state. Due to these strong attractive forces, the ions do not move freely and therefore, do not conduct electricity in the solid state.
When such a compound is dissolved in water, a high dielectric constant of water cuts down the forces of attraction between the ions. As a result, the ions get separated and dissolve in water. There is an another concept of ionisation. We know that water is a polar molecule. As oxygen is more electronegative than hydrogen, the oxygen atom acquires some partial negative charge and hydrogen atoms get positive charge. When an electrolyte (say NaCl) is dissolved in water, the polar water molecules arrange themselves around the ions. Around the positively charged Na+ ions, the water molecules arrange themselves with their negative poles facing the ions while around the negatively charged Cl ions, they arrange themselves with their positive poles facing the ions. This is shown below,

ocr_image


Due to the forces of attraction between the ions and water molecules, the electrostatic forces which bind the ions into a definite arrangement are weakened. Therefore, the ions are set free from the crystals and are dragged into the solution. The resulting ions in solution remain surrounded by water molecules and are said to be hydrated. This hydration of ions with water molecules stabilizes them.
The forces of attraction between oppositely charged ions are inversely proportional to the dielectric constant of the medium. The greater the dielectric constant, the greater is the dissolving power of the solvent. The dielectric constant of water is 80 and therefore, these forces are reduced by a factor of about 80 in aqueous solution and ions become free to move.
It is found that sodium chloride is almost completely ionised. However, all the substances do not ionise to the same extent. The degree of ionisation depends upon the polarity and the strength of the bond and the extent of solvation of the ions formed. Depending upon the extent of ionisation; the electrolytes are divided into two classes : strong electrolytes and weak electrolytes.

(i) Strong Electrolytes
The substances which ionise almost completely into ions in aqueous solution are called strong electrolytes. For example, HCl, H2SO4, HNO3, NaOH, KOH, NaCl, KNO3, etc., are strong electrolytes.
It may be noted that the equation for the ionisation reactions of strong electrolytes are written with only single headed arrow directed to the right. For example,
HCl+H2OH3O++Cl
HNO3+H2OH3O++NO3

(ii) Weak Electrolytes
The substances which ionise to a small extent in aqueous solution are called weak electrolytes. For example, CH3COOH, NH4OH, (NH4)2CO3, HCN, etc., are weak electrolytes. In such cases, the molecules are in equilibrium with their ions. The ionisation of such electrolytes is written with double headed arrows. For example,
CH3COOH+H2OH3O++CH3COO

The strong electrolytes are almost completely ionised. The unionised molecules are present to such a small extent that it is not of any significance to study the ionisation constant of strong electrolytes. However, the weak electrolytes are only partially ionised and a dynamic equilibrium is established after some time between the ions and the unionised molecules. This is called ionic equilibrium. Thus, the ionic equilibrium is the equilibrium which is established between the unionised molecules and the ions in solution of weak electrolytes.

Hello Points!

Difference between Dissociation and Ionisation
Dissociation refers to the process of separation of ions already present in the solid state of solute when dissolved in water or a solvent. For example, dissociation of sodium chloride in water.
Ionisation refers to the process in which a neutral molecule which does not contain ions splits into charged ions when dissolved in water or a solvent. For example, ionisation of a neutral molecule such as HCl in water.
However, the two terms are commonly used without any difference.

Acid-Base Concepts

Earlier views ke according, Acids wo substances hote hai jo taste meh sour hote hai, litmus paper ka colour blue to red change karte hai, water meh soluble hote hai aur certain metals ke sath react kar hydrogen gas dete hai, etc. Bases wo substances hote hai jo taste meh bitter hai aur inki soapy feel hoti hai, aur ye litmus paper ka colour red se blue meh change karte hai and they neutralize acids. Ar Svante Arrhenius, Swedish chemist, ne 1884 meh ek acids and bases ki ek new theory propose kari thi jisse arrhenius concept of acids and bases kaha jata hai. Ab, 3 concepts hote hai regarding acids aur bases. These are :

1. Arrhenius Concept of Acids and Bases
According to Arrhenius concept (1887) acid wo substance hota hai jo aqueous solution meh dissociate karta hai to give hydrogen ions, H+(aq) aur base wo substance hota hai jo aqueous solution meh dissociate karta hai to give hydroxyl ions, OH(aq). Thus, ionisation of an acid, HX in water can be represented by the following equations :

HX(aq)H+(aq)+X(aq) or
HX(aq)+H2O(l)H3O+(aq)+X(aq)

Similarly, the ionisation of a base, MOH may be written as :
MOH(aq)M+(aq)+OH(aq)

Thus, according to Arrhenius concept, acids H+ ions dete hai in water while, bases OH ions dete hai in water.
Acid or base ki strength depend karti hai upon its capacity of ionisation to H+ or OHion respectively. Acids jaise HCl, HNO3, H2SO4, etc., jo aqueous solution meh almost completely ionise ho jate hai unhe strong acids kaha jata hai while acids jaise CH3COOH, HCN, etc., jo aqueous solution meh weakly ionise hote hai unhe weak acids kaha jata hai.
Similarly, bases jaise NaOH, KOH, etc., jo aqueous solution meh almost completely ionise ho jate hai unhe strong bases while bases jaise NH4OH, Ca(OH)2, etc., jo aqueous solution meh only slightly ionise hote hai unhe weak bases kaha jata hai.

Hydronium Ion and Hydroxyl Ions
Hydrogen ion, H+ or proton ka very small size (about 1015m radius) aur intense electric field hoti hai. Therefore, ye water molecule meh present ek lone pair se readily bind karte hai aur hydronium ion, H3O+ form karte hai. Aqueous solution meh, hydronium ion itself strongly hydrate ho jati hai in solution to give species like H5O+2, H7O+3 and H9O+4. However, we shall use the simple formula H3O+ or H+.
ocr_image


Similarly hydroxyl ion is hydrated to give species like H3O2, H5O3 and H7O4

2. Bronsted-Lowry Concept
The Arrhenius concept of acids and bases further extend kara gaya tha by Johannes Bronsted aur Thomas M. Lowry (1923).
According to Bronsted-Lowry concept, acid wo substance hota hai jo proton (H+) donate kar sakta hai while base wo substance hota hai jo proton (H+) accept kar sakta hai. In other words, according to Bronsted-Lowry concept, acid proton donor hota hai aur base proton acceptor hota hai. For example, in the following reaction, HCl ek proton lose karta hai isliye ye acid hota hai whereas NH3 proton accept karta hai aur isliye ye base hota hai.
HCl(aq)+NH3(aq)NH+4(aq)+Cl(aq)

Iss concept ki main advantage hai ke ye neutral molecules tak hi restrict nahi rahta. Rather, acids aur bases neutral molecules ya ions ho sakte hai. Some other examples of acids and bases are :
ocr_image


Acid-base reactions ko proton transfer reactions ki tarah regard kara gaya hai. Ab certain substances jaise H2O, HCO3, HSO4, etc., jo protons ko donate as well as accept karne ke capable hote hai, unn substances ko amphoteric substances kaha jata hai.

The Bronsted-Lowry Acids and Bases
According to Bronsted-Lowry theory, acid wo substance hota hai jo hydrogen ion H+ ko donate karne ke capable hota hai aur bases wo substances hote hai jo hydrogen ion, H+ ko accept karne ke capable hote hai. In short, acids proton donors aur bases proton acceptors hote hai. Ab hum ek example consider karte hai jisme NH3 ki H2O meh dissolution ho rahi hai isse following equation se represent kara gaya hai,
ocr_image


Ab due to the presence of hydroxyl ions basic solution form hota hai. In this reaction, water molecule proton donor aur ammonia molecule proton acceptor ki tarah act karta hai aur isliye inhe, Lowry-Bronsted acid and base respectively kaha jata hai. Reverse reaction meh, H+ ion NH+4 se OH meh transfer ho jati hai. Iss case meh, NH+4 as a Bronsted acid while OH as a Bronsted base act karta hai. Ye acid-base pair jo differ karta hai only by one proton is called a conjugate acid-base pair. Therefore, OH ko conjugate base of an acid H2O aur NH+4 ko conjugate acid of the base NH3 kaha jata hai. Agar Bronsted acid strong acid hota hai then iska conjugate base ek weak base hota hai and vice-versa. It may be noted that conjugate acid ke paas 1 extra proton aur each conjugate base ke paas 1 less proton hota hai and are thus, called Lowry-Bronsted acid and base, respectively.
Ab hum consider karte hai ek example of ionisation of hydrochloric acid in water. HCl(aq), H2O molecule ko ek proton donate karke acid ki tarah aur H2O base ki tarah act karta hai.
ocr_image


It can be seen in the above equation, that water proton accept karta hai aur ye base ki tarah act karta hai. Ab species H3O+ tab produce hoti hai jab water 1 proton ko HCl se accept karta hai. Therefore, Cl conjugate base hota hai of acid HCl aur HCl conjugate acid hota hai of base Cl. Similarly, H2O conjugate base hota hai of acid H3O+ aur H3O+ conjugate acid hota hai of base H2O. It is interesting to observe the dual role of water as an acid and a base. In case of reaction with HCl water acts as a base while in case of ammonia it acts as an acid by donating a proton.

Advantages of Bronsted-Lowry Concept over Arrhenius Concept
(i) Bronsted Lowry concept substances jaise ka Na2CO3,NH3, etc., (which do not contain OH group and hence were not bases according to Arrhenius concept) basic character explain kar sakta hai on the basis that they accept protons.
(ii) Bronsted Lowry concept sirf molecules tak limited nahi hota lekin ye ionic species bhi cover karta hai to act as acids or bases.
(iii) Bronsted Lowry concept non-aqueous medium meh acid-base reactions ko bhi explain karta hai.

Limitations of Bronsted-Lowry Concept
Though Bronsted-Lowry concept ki wider applications hoti hai as compared to Arrhenius concept, yet iski kuch limitations bhi hoti hai.
(i) Ye acidic oxides jaise CO2, SO2, SO3, etc., aur basic oxides jaise CaO, BaO, MgO, etc., ke beech reactions ko explain nahi kar paata jo absence of the solvent meh occur karti hai.
CaO+SO3CaSO4

(ii) Substances jaise BF3, AlCl3, etc., acids ki tarah behave karte hai lekin inme donation ke liye protons nahi hote.

3. Lewis Concept of Acids and Bases
Arrhenius aur Lowry-Bronsted concept of acids and bases sirf unhi substances tak limited rahti hai jo protons contain karte hai. G.N. Lewis (1923) ne more general aur broader concept propose kara hai of acids and bases. According to this concept, acid wo substance (molecule or ion) hota hai jo ek pair of electrons ko accept kar sakta hai while base wo substance (molecule or ion) hota hai jo ek pair of electrons ko donate kar sakta hai.
ocr_image


In other words, acids electron pair acceptors hote hai while bases electron pair donors hote hai. Thus, ye evident hai that any substance which has an unshared pair of electrons wo Lewis base ki tarah act kar sakta hai while a substance which has an empty orbital jo accommodate pair of electrons ko kar sakta hai wo Lewis acid ki tarah act karta hai. In fact, donation of a pair of electrons hota hai from Lewis base to Lewis acid jisse inke beech ek coordinate bond form hota hai.

Lewis Bases
Lewis concept ke according, following species Lewis bases ki tarah act kar sakti hai.
(i) Neutral species jinke paas atleast 1 lone pair of electron present hai. For example, ammonia, amines, alcohols, etc., ye lewis bases ki tarah act kar sakte hai kyunki ye ek lone pair of electrons consist karte hai : NH3, -NH2, ROH
(ii) Negatively charged species ya anions. For example, chloride, cyanide, hydroxide ions, etc., ye lewis bases ki tarah act karte hai : CN, Cl, OH

Lewis Acids
Lewis concept ke according, following species lewis acids ki tarah act kar sakte hai :
(i) Molecules jinme central atom ka octet incomplete hai. For example, BF3, AlCl3, FeCl3 meh central atom ke around only six electrons hote hai as shown below :
ocr_image


(ii) Simple cations, lewis acids ki tarah act kar sakti hai. Ab sabhi cations lewis acids ki tarah isliye act karti hai kyunki ye electron deficient hai in nature. However, cations jaise Na+, K+, Ca2+ ions, etc., ki electron accept karne ki very little tendency hoti hai. While cations jaise H+, Ag+ ion etc., ki electron accept karne ki tendency greater hoti hai aur, isliye, ye lewis acids ki tarah act karti hai.
ocr_image


(iii) Molecules jinme central atom ke paas empty d-orbitals present hoti hai. Empty d-orbitals ki presence ki wajah se, inn molecules ki central atoms apne outer octet ko other substances (Lewis bases) se electrons accept kar expand kar leti hai. Molecules jaise SiF4, SnCl4, PF5, etc., Lewis acids ki tarah act karte hai.
SiF4Lewis Acid+2FLewis Base[SiF6]2

(iv) Molecules jinme dissimilar electronegativities ki atoms multiple bonds se joined hoti hai. For example, CO2 aur SO2 lewis acids ki tarah act karti hai. CO2 ke structure ko represent kara ja saakta hai as O=C=O. Lewis base ki influence meh, ek π-electron oxygen atom ki side shift ho jata hai.
ocr_image


Acid Base Reactions According to Lewis Theory
Kuch reactions combination of Lewis acids aur Lewis bases ko involve karte hai wo hai :
(i) Combination betweeen H+ ion and NH3.
ocr_image


(ii) Combination between BF3 and F ion.
ocr_image


Limitations of Lewis Concept
Though Lewis concept of acids and bases more general hota hai as compared to Arrhenius as well as Bronsted-Lowry concepts, yet iske several drawbacks bhi hote hai as discussed below :
(i) Lewis concept is too general aur ye sabhi coordination compounds aur coordination reactions ko include karta hai. This, however, may not always be true.
(ii) Ye well known protonic acids jaise HCl, H2SO4, etc., ke behaviour ko explain nahi karta jo bases ke sath coordinate bonds form nahi karte. Therefore, inhe acids ki tarah consider nahi kiya jata according to Lewis Concept.
(iii) Ye relative strengths of acids aur bases ko explain nahi karta.
(iv) Acid-base reactions usually fast hoti hai lekin yahan coordination compounds ka formation slow hota hai. Hence, ye acid-base reaction concept meh fit nahi hota.
(v) Many acids ki catalytic activity H+(aq) ion ki wajah se hoti hai. Since, Lewis acid meh hydrogen present nahi hote, therefore, many Lewis acids catalytic property possess nahi karte.

Ionisation of Acids and Bases
Arrhenius concept of acids and bases useful hota hai in case of ionisation of acids and bases kyunki mostly ionisations in chemical and biological systems, aqueous medium meh occur karti hai. Strong acids jaise perchloric acid (HClO4), hydrochloric acid (HCl), hydrobromic acid (HBr), hydroiodic acid (HI), nitric acid (HNO3) aur sulphuric acid (H2SO4) ko term kara gaya hai as strong acid because ye almost completely dissociate ho jate hai into their constituent ions in an aqueous medium, thereby ye act karte hai as proton (H+) donors. Similarly, strong bases jaise lithium hydroxide (LiOH), sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide (KOH), caesium hydroxide (CsOH) aur barium hydroxide Ba(OH)2 ye almost completely dissociate hote hai into ions in an aqueous medium aur hydroxyl ions, OH dete hai.
According to Arrhenius concept ye strong acids aur bases hote hai as they are able to completely dissociate and produce H3O+ and OH ions respectively in the medium. Alternatively, strength of an acid or base may also be gauged in terms of Bronsted-Lowry concept of acids and bases, yahan strong acid matlab good proton donor aur strong base matlab good proton acceptor hai.
Consider, the acid-base dissociation equilibrium of a weak acid HA.
HA(aq)Acid+H2O(l)BaseH3O+(aq)Conjugate acid+A(aq)Conjugate base

Above part meh humne dhekha ke acid (or base) dissociation equilibrium, dynamic in nature hota hai involving a transfer of proton in forward and reverse directions. Ab hum 2 acids consider karte hai HA aur H3O+ jo present hai in the above mentioned acid-dissociation equilibrium. Ab hume ye batana hai that which amongst them is a stronger proton donor. Jo exceed karega in its tendency of donating a proton over the other usse stronger acid kaha jayega and equilibrium in the direction of weaker acid shift hoga. Say, if HA is a stronger acid than H3O+, then HA will donate protons and not H3O+, and the solution will mainly contain A and H3O+ ions. Ab equilibrium, formation of weaker acid and weaker base ki direction meh move hota hai because stronger acid proton donate karta hai to stronger base. It follows that strong acid dissociate karta hai completely in water, toh jo resulting base form hota hai wo very weak hota hai i.e., strong acids have very weak conjugate bases. Strong acids jaise perchloric acid (HClO4), hydrochloric acid (HCl), hydrobromic acid (HBr), hydroiodic acid (HI), nitric acid (HNO3) and sulphuric acid (H2SO4) conjugate base ions ClO4, Cl, Br , I, NO3 aur HSO4 dete hai, jo much weaker bases hote hai than H2O. Similarly very strong base, very weak conjugate acid deta hai. On the other hand, weak acid say HA partially dissociate hota hai in aqueous medium and thus, solution mainly undissociated HA molecules contain karta hai. Typically nitrous acid (HNO2), hydrofluoric acid (HF) aur acetic acid (CH3COOH) weak acids hote hai. It should be noted that weak acids ke very strong conjugate bases hote hai. For example, NH2, O2 and H very good proton acceptors hote hai and thus, stronger bases hote hai than H2O.
Certain water soluble organic compounds jaise phenolphthalein aur bromothymol blue weak acids ki tarah behave karte hai aur different colours exhibit karte hai in their acid (HIn) and conjugate Base (In ) forms.
HIn(aq)Acid Indicator Colour A+H2O(l)H3O+(aq)Conjugate Acid+In(aq)Conjugate Base colour B

Iss type ke compounds acid-base titrations meh as an indicator use kare jate hai, aur ye H+ ion concentration ko find out karne meh bhi useful rahte hai.

Acid-Base Concepts

According to earlier views, Acids were substances that tasted sour, changed the colour of litmus paper from blue to red, soluble in water and react with certain metals to give hydrogen gas, etc. Bases were substances that tasted bitten have soapy feel, change the colour of litmus paper from red to blue and neutralize acids. In 1884, Ar Svante Arrhenius, a Swedish chemist, proposed a new theory of acids and bases known as arrhenius concept of acids and bases. Now, there are three main concepts regarding acids and bases. These are :

1. Arrhenius Concept of Acids and Bases
According to Arrhenius concept (1887) an acid is a substance which dissociates in aqueous solution to give hydrogen ions, H+(aq) and base is a substance which dissociates in aqueous solution to give hydroxyl ions, OH(aq). Thus, ionisation of an acid, HX in water can be represented by the following equations :

HX(aq)H+(aq)+X(aq) or
HX(aq)+H2O(l)H3O+(aq)+X(aq)

Similarly, the ionisation of a base, MOH may be written as :
MOH(aq)M+(aq)+OH(aq)

Thus, according to Arrhenius concept, acids give H+ ions in water while, bases give OH ions in water.
The strength of an acid or a base depends upon its capacity of ionisation to H+ or OHion respectively. Acids such as HCl, HNO3, H2SO4, etc., which are almost completely ionised in aqueous solution are called strong acids while acids such as CH3COOH, HCN, etc., which are weakly ionised in aqueous solution are called weak acids.
Similarly, bases such as NaOH, KOH, etc., which are almost completely ionised in aqueous solution are called strong bases while bases such as NH4OH, Ca(OH)2, etc., which are only slightly ionised in aqueous solution are called weak bases.
Hydronium Ion and Hydroxyl Ions
Hydrogen ion, H+ or proton has very small size (about 1015m radius) and intense electric field. Therefore, it readily binds to a water molecule at one of the two available lone pairs to form hydronium ion, H3O+. In aqueous solution, the hydronium ion is itself strongly hydrated in solution to give species like H5O+2, H7O+3 and H9O+4. However, we shall use the simple formula H3O+ or H+.
ocr_image


Similarly hydroxyl ion is hydrated to give species like H3O2, H5O3 and H7O4

2. Bronsted-Lowry Concept
The Arrhenius concept of acids and bases was extended further by Johannes Bronsted and Thomas M. Lowry (1923).
According to Bronsted-Lowry concept, an acid is a substance which can donate proton (H+) while a base is a substance which can accept a proton (H+). In other words, according to Bronsted-Lowry concept, acid is a proton donor and base is a proton acceptor. For example, in the following reaction, HCl loses a proton and is an acid whereas NH3 accepts a proton and is a base.
HCl(aq)+NH3(aq)NH+4(aq)+Cl(aq)

The main advantage of this concept is that it is not restricted to neutral molecules. Rather, acids and bases can be either neutral molecules or ions. Some other examples of acids and bases are :
ocr_image


The acid-base reactions are regarded as proton transfer reactions. There are certain substances such as H2O, HCO3, HSO4, etc., which are capable of donating as well as accepting the proton. These substances are called amphoteric substances.

The Bronsted-Lowry Acids and Bases
According to Bronsted-Lowry theory, acid is a substance that is capable of donating a hydrogen ion H+ and bases are substances capable of accepting a hydrogen ion, H+. In short, acids are proton donors and bases are proton acceptors. Consider the example of dissolution of NH3 in H2O represented by the following equation,
ocr_image


The basic solution is formed due to the presence of hydroxyl ions. In this reaction, water molecule acts as proton donor and ammonia molecule acts as proton acceptor and are thus, called Lowry-Bronsted acid and base, respectively. In the reverse reaction, H+ is transferred from NH+4 to OH. In this case, NH+4 acts as a Bronsted acid while OH acted as a Bronsted base. The acid-base pair that differs only by one proton is called a conjugate acid-base pair. Therefore, OH is called the conjugate base of an acid H2O and NH+4 is called conjugate acid of the base NH3. If Bronsted acid is a strong acid then its conjugate base is a weak base and vice-versa. It may be noted that conjugate acid has one extra proton and each conjugate base has one less proton and are thus, called Lowry-Bronsted acid and base, respectively.
Consider the example of ionisation of hydrochloric acid in water. HCl(aq) acts as an acid by donating a proton to H2O molecule which acts as a base.
ocr_image


It can be seen in the above equation, that water acts as a base because it accepts the proton. The species H3O+ is produced when water accepts a proton from HCl. Therefore, Cl is a conjugate base of HCl and HCl is the conjugate acid of base Cl. Similarly, H2O is a conjugate base of an acid H3O+ and H3O+ is a conjugate acid of base H2O. It is interesting to observe the dual role of water as an acid and a base. In case of reaction with HCl water acts as a base while in case of ammonia it acts as an acid by donating a proton.

Advantages of Bronsted-Lowry Concept over Arrhenius Concept
(i) Bronsted Lowry concept can explain the basic character of substances like Na2CO3, NH3, etc., (which do not contain OH group and hence were not bases according to Arrhenius concept) on the basis that they accept protons.
(ii) Bronsted Lowry concept is not limited to molecules but also covers even the ionic species to act as acids or bases.
(iii) Bronsted Lowry concept can explain the acid-base reactions in the non-aqueous medium also.

Limitations of Bronsted-Lowry Concept
Though Bronsted-Lowry concept has wider applications than Arrhenius concept, yet it has some limitations also.
(i) It cannot explain the reactions between acidic oxides like CO2, SO2, SO3, etc., and basic oxides like CaO, BaO, MgO, etc.,which take place even in the absence of the solvent.
CaO+SO3CaSO4

(ii) Substances like BF3, AlCl3, etc., are known to behave as acids but they do not have protons to donate.

3. Lewis Concept of Acids and Bases
The Arrhenius and Lowry-Bronsted concept of acids and bases are limited to substances which contain protons. G.N. Lewis (1923) proposed a more general and broader concept of acids and bases. According to this concept, an acid is a substance (molecule or ion) which can accept a pair of electrons while a base is a substance (molecule or ion) which can donate a pair of electrons.
ocr_image


In other words, acids are electron pair acceptors while bases are electron pair donors. Thus, it is evident that any substance which has an unshared pair of electrons can act as a Lewis base while a substance which has an empty orbital that can accommodate a pair of electrons acts as Lewis acid. In fact, there is a donation of a pair of electrons from Lewis base to Lewis acid to form a coordinate bond between the two.

Lewis Bases
According to Lewis concept, the following species can act as Lewis bases.
(i) Neutral species having at least one lone pair of electrons. For example, ammonia, amines, alcohols, etc., act as Lewis bases because they contain a pair of electrons : NH3, -NH2, ROH
(ii) Negatively charged species or anions. For example, chloride, cyanide, hydroxide ions, etc., act as Lewis bases : CN, Cl, OH

Lewis Acids
According to Lewis concept, the following species can act as Lewis acids :
(i) Molecules in which the central atom has incomplete octet. For example, in BF3, AlCl3, FeCl3, the central atom has only six electrons around it as shown below :
ocr_image


(ii) Simple cations can act as Lewis acids. All cations are expected to act as Lewis acids since they are deficient in electrons. However, cations such as Na+, K+, Ca2+ ions, etc., have a very little tendency to accept electrons. While the cations like H+, Ag+ ion etc., have a greater electron accepting tendency and, therefore, act as Lewis acids.
ocr_image


(iii) Molecules in which the central atom has empty d-orbitals. Due to the presence of empty d-orbitals, the central atoms in these molecules can expand their outer octets by accepting electrons from other substances (Lewis bases). The molecules such as SiF4, SnCl4, PF5, etc., act as Lewis acids.
SiF4Lewis Acid+2FLewis Base[SiF6]2

(iv) Molecules in which atoms of dissimilar electronegativities are joined by multiple bonds. For example, CO2 and SO2 act as Lewis acids. The structure of CO2 may be represented as O=C=O. Under the influence of the attacking Lewis base, one π-electron pair will be shifted towards the oxygen atom.
ocr_image


Acid Base Reactions According to Lewis Theory
Some of the reactions involving the combination of Lewis acids and Lewis bases are :
(i) Combination betweeen H+ ion and NH3.
ocr_image


(ii) Combination between BF3 and F ion.
ocr_image


Limitations of Lewis Concept
Though Lewis concept of acids and bases is more general than Arrhenius as well as Bronsted-Lowry concepts, yet it has several drawbacks as discussed below :
(i) Lewis concept is too general and includes all the coordination compounds and coordination reactions. This, however, may not always be true.
(ii) It does not explain the behaviour of well known protonic acids like HCl, H2SO4, etc., which do not form coordinate bonds with bases. Therefore, these are not regarded as acids according to Lewis Concept.
(iii) It does not explain the relative strengths of acids and bases.
(iv) Acid-base reactions are usually fast but the formation of coordination compounds is slow. Hence, it does not fit in the acid-base reaction concept.
(v) The catalytic activity of many acids is due to H+(aq) ion. Since a Lewis acid need not contain hydrogen, therefore, many Lewis acids will not possess catalytic property.

Ionisation of Acids and Bases
Arrhenius concept of acids and bases becomes useful in case of ionization of acids and bases as mostly ionisations in chemical and biological systems occur in aqueous medium. Strong acids like perchloric acid (HClO4), hydrochloric acid (HCl), hydrobromic acid (HBr), hydroiodic acid (HI), nitric acid (HNO3) and sulphuric acid (H2SO4) are termed strong because they are almost completely dissociated into their constituent ions in an aqueous medium, thereby acting as proton (H+) donors. Similarly, strong bases like lithium hydroxide (LiOH), sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide (KOH), caesium hydroxide (CsOH) and barium hydroxide Ba(OH)2 are almost completely dissociated into ions in an aqueous medium giving hydroxyl ions, OH.
According to Arrhenius concept they are strong acids and bases as they are able to completely dissociate and produce H3O+ and OH ions respectively in the medium. Alternatively, the strength of an acid or base may also be gauged in terms of Brönsted-Lowry concept of acids and bases, wherein a strong acid means a good proton donor and a strong base implies a good proton acceptor.
Consider, the acid-base dissociation equilibrium of a weak acid HA.
HA(aq)Acid+H2O(l)BaseH3O+(aq)Conjugate acid+A(aq)Conjugate base

In above part we saw that acid (or base) dissociation equilibrium is dynamic involving a transfer of proton in forward and reverse directions. Consider the two acids HA and H3O+ present in the above mentioned acid-dissociation equilibrium. We have to see which amongst them is a stronger proton donor. Whichever exceeds in its tendency of donating a proton over the other shall be termed as the stronger acid and the equilibrium will shift in the direction of weaker acid. Say, if HA is a stronger acid than H3O+, then HA will donate protons and not H3O+, and the solution will mainly contain A and H3O+ ions. The equilibrium moves in the direction of formation of weaker acid and weaker base because the stronger acid donates a proton to the stronger base. It follows that as a strong acid dissociates completely in water, the resulting base formed would be very weak i.e., strong acids have very weak conjugate bases. Strong acids like perchloric acid (HClO4), hydrochloric acid (HCl), hydrobromic acid (HBr), hydroiodic acid (HI), nitric acid (HNO3) and sulphuric acid (H2SO4) will give conjugate base ions ClO4, Cl, Br , I, NO3 and HSO4 , which are much weaker bases than H2O. Similarly a very strong base would give a very weak conjugate acid. On the other hand, a weak acid say HA is only partially dissociated in aqueous medium and thus, the solution mainly contains undissociated HA molecules. Typical weak acids are nitrous acid (HNO2), hydrofluoric acid (HF) and acetic acid (CH3COOH). It should be noted that the weak acids have very strong conjugate bases. For example, NH2, O2 and H are very good proton acceptors and thus, much stronger bases than H2O.
Certain water soluble organic compounds like phenolphthalein and bromothymol blue behave as weak acids and exhibit different colours in their acid (HIn) and conjugate base (In ) forms.
HIn(aq)Acid Indicator Colour A+H2O(l)H3O+(aq)Conjugate Acid+In(aq)Conjugate Base Colour B

Such compounds are useful as indicator in acid-base titrations, and finding out H+ ion concentration.

EXAMPLE 1

(a) What are conjugate bases of each of the following :
HS,H3O+,H2PO4,HSO4,CH3COOH,[Al(H2O)6]3+,H2SO4
(b) Give the conjugate acids of the following :
OH,HCO3,HPO24,CH3NH2,CO23,CH3COOH,NH2,HCOO
(c) Which of the following behave both as Bronsted acids as well as Bronsted bases ?
H2O,HCO3,H2SO4,H3PO4,HS

(a) Conjugate base :
HS:S2
H3O+:H2O
H2PO4:HPO24
HSO4:SO24
CH3COOH:CH3COO
[Al(H2O)6]3+:[Al(H2O)5OH]2+
H2SO4:HSO4

(b) Conjugate acids :
OH:H2O
HCO3:H2CO3
HPO24:H2PO4
CH3NH2:CH3NH+3
CO23:HCO3
CH3COOH:CH3COOH+2
NH2:NH3
HCOO:HCOOH

(c) Bronsted acids as well as Bronsted bases :
H2O,HCO3,HS behave both as acids and bases. These are called amphoteric substances.

EXAMPLE 2

Write the formula of conjugate acids of :
(i) C6H5OH , (ii) NH2NH2 , (iii) HCO3

(i) C6H5OH+2 , (ii) NH2NH+3 , (iii) H2CO3

Ionisation Constant of Water and Ionic Product of Water

Water ek weak electrolyte hota hai aur ye small extent meh self dissociation undergo karta hai as :

H2O(l)+H2O(l)H3O+(aq)+OH(aq)

Water ki ionisation ke liye dissociation constant hai :
K=[H3O+][OH][H2O]2

Since water ka degree of dissociation very small hota hai, toh undissociated water ki concentration ko practically constant liya ja sakta hai. Thus, we have,
K×[H2O]2=[H3O+][OH]
or K×constant=[H3O+][OH]
or Kw=[H3O+][OH]

yahan Kw constant hota hai aur isse ionic product of water kaha jata hai. Iski value constant hoti hai at a particular temperature aur ye temperature meh change hone par vary karti hai. At 298 K, the value of Kw, is 1.008×1014mol2L2. That is,
Kw=[H3O+][OH]=1.008×1014
or =1×1014 (for simplicity) at 298 K

Ab ye evident hai that pure water meh H3O+ aur OH ions ki concentration equal rahti hai so that [H3O+]=[OH]
ocr_image


Thus, pure water meh, [H3O+]=[OH] = 1.0×107molL1 hota hai at 298 K.
Kw ki value temperature dependent hoti hai as ye equilibrium constant hai.
Pure water ki density 1000g/L hai aur iska molar mass 18.0g/mol hota hai. Inn values se hum pure water ki molarity ko calculate kar sakte hai as,
[H2O]=(1000g/L)(1mol/18.0g)=55.55M.

Therefore, dissociated water ka undissociated water ke sath ratio ko diya jata hai as: 107/(55.55)=1.8×109 or ~ 2 in 109 (thus, equilibrium lies mainly towards undissociated water).
Ab hum acidic, neutral aur basic aqueous solutions ko unki H3O+ aur OH concentrations ki relative values se distinguish kar sakte hai :
Acidic : [H3O+] > [OH]
Neutral : [H3O+] = [OH]
Basic : [H3O+] < [OH]

Effect of Temperature on Kw
Ab [H3O+] aur [OH] ions ki values all temperatures par equal rahti hai lekin Kw ki values, different temperatures par different hoti hai. The values of Kw, at different temperatures are given in below table.
ocr_image


Ab ye clear hai that Kw ki value temperature rise hone par increase hoti hai. This can be easily understood as follows :
2H2O(l)H3O+(aq)+OH(aq) ; ΔH=+57.3 kJ

Le-Chatelier's principle ke according, temperature increase hone par equilibrium forward direction meh shift ho jata hai aur iss wajah se ab larger concentrations of H3O+ and OH ions produce hoti hai. Hence, Kw temperature rise hone par increase hota hai.

Ionisation Constant of Water and Ionic Product of Water

Water is a weak electrolyte and undergoes self dissociation to a small extent as :

H2O(l)+H2O(l)H3O+(aq)+OH(aq)

The dissociation constant for the ionisation of water is :
K=[H3O+][OH][H2O]2

Since the degree of dissociation of water is very small, the concentration of undissociated water may be practically taken as constant. Thus, we have,
K×[H2O]2=[H3O+][OH]
or K×constant=[H3O+][OH]
or Kw=[H3O+][OH]

where Kw is a constant and is known as ionic product of water. Its value is constant at a particular temperature and varies with the change in temperature. At 298 K, the value of Kw, is 1.008×1014mol2L2. That is,
Kw=[H3O+][OH]=1.008×1014
or =1×1014 (for simplicity) at 298 K

It is quite evident that the concentrations of H3O+ and OH ions are equal in pure water so that [H3O+]=[OH]
ocr_image


Thus, in pure water, [H3O+]=[OH] = 1.0×107molL1 at 298 K.
The value of Kw is temperature dependent as it is an equilibrium constant.
The density of pure water is 1000g/L and its molar mass is 18.0g/mol. From this the molarity of pure water can be given as,
[H2O]=(1000g/L)(1mol/18.0g)=55.55M.

Therefore, the ratio of dissociated water to that of undissociated water can be given as: 107/(55.55)=1.8×109 or ~ 2 in 109 (thus, equilibrium lies mainly towards undissociated water).
We can distinguish acidic, neutral and basic aqueous solutions by the relative values of the H3O+ and OH concentrations :
Acidic : [H3O+] > [OH]
Neutral : [H3O+] = [OH]
Basic : [H3O+] < [OH]

Effect of Temperature on Kw
The values of [H3O+] and [OH] are always equal at all temperatures but values of Kw, are different at different temperatures. The values of Kw, at different temperatures are given in below table.
ocr_image


It is clear that the value of Kw increases with rise in temperature. This can be easily understood as follows :
2H2O(l)H3O+(aq)+OH(aq) ; ΔH=+57.3 kJ

In accordance with Le-Chatelier's principle, increase in temperature will shift the equilibrium in the forward direction producing larger concentrations of H3O+ and OH ions. Hence, Kw increases with rise in temperature.

Expressing Hydrogen Ion Concentration- pH Scale

Hydronium ion ki concentration molarity meh more conveniently express kari jati hai on a logarithmic scale jisse pH scale kaha jata hai. Solution ke pH ko define kara jata hai as the negative logarithm to base 10 of the activity (aH) of hydrogen ion. Dilute solutions meh (<0.01M), hydrogen ion (H+) ki activity molarity ki magnitude ke equal hoti hai jisse [H+] se represent kara jata hai. Ab ye note karna that activity ki units nahi hoti aur isse define kara jata hai as :

aH+=[H+]/molL1

From the definition of pH, the following can be written,
pH=logaH+=log{[H+]/molL1}

Thus, HCl (102 M) ke acidic solution ka pH=2 hota hai. Similarly, NaOH having [OH]=104 M and [H3O+]=1010 M ke basic solution ka pH=10 hota hai. At 25 °C, pure water meh hydrogen ions ki concentration, [H+]=107 M hoti hai. Hence, pure water ka pH diya jata hai as :
pH=log(107)=7

Acidic solutions meh hydrogen ions ki concentration, [H+]>107 M hoti hai, while basic solutions meh hydrogen ions ki concentration, [H+]<107 M hoti hai. Thus, we can summarise that,
Acidic solution has pH<7
Basic solution has pH>7
Neutral solution has pH=7

ocr_image


Now again, consider the equation at 298 K.
Kw=[H3O+][OH]=1014

Taking negative logarithm on both sides of equation, we obtain,
logKw=log{[H3O+][OH]}
=log[H3O+]log[OH]
=log1014
pKw=pH+pOH=14
Note : Although Kw, temperature ke sath change ho sakta hai, lekin temperature ke sath pH meh variations bahut small hoti hai that we often ignore it.
pKw aqueous solutions ke liye bahut important quantity hoti hai aur ye hydrogen aur hydroxyl ions ki relative concentrations ko control karta hai as their product is a constant. It should be noted that as pH scale logarithmic hai, toh iska matlab pH meh just one unit change hone par, [H+] meh change aata hai by a factor of 10. Similarly, jab hydrogen ion concentration, [H+] change hoti hai by a factor of 100, toh pH ki value 2 units se change hoti hai. Solution ka pH bahut essential hota hai as its value should be known when dealing with biological and cosmetic applications. Solution ke pH ko hum roughly pH paper ki help se find out kar sakte hai ye paper different pH solutions meh different colour deta hai.
Now-a-days pH paper is available with four strips on it. Different strips ke different colours hote hai at the same pH. The pH in the range of 114 can be determined with an accuracy of ~0.5 using pH paper.
ocr_image


Greater accuracy ke liye pH meters ko use kara jata hai. pH meter ek device hota hai jo test solution ke pH-dependent electrical potential ko measure karta hai within 0.001 precision. pH meters jinka size writing pen ke jitna hota hai wo bhi ab market meh available hai. The pH of some very common substances are given in table.
ocr_image

Expressing Hydrogen Ion Concentration- pH Scale

Hydronium ion concentration in molarity is more conveniently expressed on a logarithmic scale known as the pH scale. The pH of a solution is defined as the negative logarithm to base 10 of the activity (aH) of hydrogen ion. In dilute solutions (<0.01M), activity of hydrogen ion (H+) is equal in magnitude to molarity represented by [H+]. It should be noted that activity has no units and is defined as :

aH+=[H+]/molL1

From the definition of pH, the following can be written,
pH=logaH+=log{[H+]/molL1}

Thus, an acidic solution of HCl (102 M) will have a pH=2. Similarly, a basic solution of NaOH having [OH] =104 M and [H3O+] = 1010 M will have a pH=10. At 25 °C, pure water has a concentration of hydrogen ions, [H+]=107 M. Hence, the pH of pure water is given as :
pH=log(107)=7

Acidic solutions possess a concentration of hydrogen ions, [H+]>107 M, while basic solutions possess a concentration of hydrogen ions, [H+]<107 M. Thus, we can summarise that,
Acidic solution has pH<7
Basic solution has pH>7
Neutral solution has pH=7

ocr_image


Now again, consider the equation at 298 K.
Kw=[H3O+][OH]=1014

Taking negative logarithm on both sides of equation, we obtain,
logKw=log{[H3O+][OH]}
=log[H3O+]log[OH]
=log1014
pKw=pH+pOH=14
Note : Although Kw may change with temperature the variations in pH with temperature are so small that we often ignore it.
pKw is a very important quantity for aqueous solutions and controls the relative concentrations of hydrogen and hydroxyl ions as their product is a constant. It should be noted that as the pH scale is logarithmic, a change in pH by just one unit also means change in [H+] by a factor of 10. Similarly, when the hydrogen ion concentration, [H+] changes by a factor of 100, the value of pH changes by 2 units. Measurement of pH of a solution is very essential as its value should be known when dealing with biological and cosmetic applications. The pH of a solution can be found roughly with the help of pH paper that has different colour in solutions of different pH.
Now-a-days pH paper is available with four strips on it. The different strips have different colours at the same pH. The pH in the range of 114 can be determined with an accuracy of ~0.5 using pH paper.
ocr_image


For greater accuracy pH meters are used. pH meter is a device that measures the pH-dependent electrical potential of the test solution within 0.001 precision. pH meters of the size of a writing pen are now available in the market. The pH of some very common substances are given in table.
ocr_image

EXAMPLE 3

Calculate the hydronium and hydroxyl ion concentrations in
(i) 0.01 M HCl
(ii) 0.005 M NaOH solution at 298 K.

(i) HCl completely ionises as :
HCl(aq)+H2O(l)H3O+(aq)+Cl(aq)
Therefore , the concentration of hydronium ions is equal to that of hydrochloric acid,
i.e., [H3O+]=[HCl]
Here [HCl]=0.01M=1×102 M
[H3O+]=1×102M=1×102mol L1
Now , the ionic product , Kw=[H3O+][OH]
or [OH]=Kw[H3O+]=1×10141×102=1×1012mol L1
Thus [H3O+]=1×102mol L1 and [OH]=1×1012mol L1
(ii) NaOH completely ionises as :
NaOH(aq)Na+(aq)+OH(aq)
The concentration of OH ions is equal to that of the sodium hydroxide , i.e.
[NaOH]=[OH]
Here, [NaOH]=0.005M=5×103mol L1
[OH]=5×103mol L1
Now, Kw=[H3O+][OH]
or [H3O+]=Kw[OH]=1×10145×103
=2×1012mol L1
Thus, [OH]=5×103mol L1 and [H3O+]=2×1012mol L1

EXAMPLE 4

Calculate the pH value of :
(i) 0.001 M HNO3 ,
(ii) 0.01 M NaOH.

(i) Since HNO3 is a strong acid, it completely ionises and therefore, H3O+ ions concentration is equal to that of the acid itself i.e.,
[H3O+]=[HNO3]=0.001M=1×103 M
Now, pH = log[H3O+]
or pH=log[1×103]
=(3)log10=3 ( log10=1)

(ii) Since NaOH is a strong base, it completely ionises. Therefore, the hydroxyl ion concentration is equal to that of the base itself, i.e
[OH] = [NaOH]=0.01M=1×102 M
Now, Kw=[H3O+][OH]
[H3O+]=Kw[OH]=1×10141×102=1×1012
pH=log [H3O+]
=log [1×1012]=12

Ionisation Constants of Weak Acids

Ab hum ek weak acid HX ko consider karte hai jo partially ionised hota hai in aqueous solution. Equilibrium ko express kara ja sakta hai by:

HXcInitialConcentration (M)+H2O(l)H3O+0(aq)+X0(aq)

Let α extent of ionisation change hai (M). Therefore, equilibrium concentration (M) hai.
HXccαEquilibriumConcentration (M)+H2O(l)H3O+cα(aq)+Xcα(aq)

Here, c = initial concentration of the undissociated acid, HX at time, t=0, α= extent upto which HX is ionized into ions. Inn notations ko use kar, above discussed acid dissociation equilibrium ke equilibrium constant ko hum derive kar sakte hai as :
Ka=c2α2c(1α)=cα21α

Ka ko dissociation or ionisation constant of acid HX kaha jata hai. Isse alternatively molar concentration ki terms meh express kara ja sakta hai as follows,
Ka=[H+][X][HX]

At a given temperature T, Ka, acid HX ki strength ka measure hota hai i.e., Ka ki jitni larger value hoti hai, utna stronger acid hota hai. Ka ek dimensionless quantity hai aur ye maana gaya hai that sabhi species ki standard state concentration 1 M hai. The values of the ionisation constants of some selected weak acids are given in table below.
ocr_image


Calculation of pH or pOH of Weak Electrolytes
Hydrogen ion concentration ke liye pH scale bahut useful hai ye besides pKw, other species aur quantities ke liye bhi use kara jata hai. Thus, we have :
pKa=log(Ka)

Ab agar hume ionisation constant, Ka of an acid aur uski initial concentration c pata hai toh, sabhi species ki equilibrium concentration, degree of ionisation of the acid and pH of the solution ko calculate ka sakte hai. Ab hum ek general step-wise approach ko adopt ka sakte hai jiski help se weak electrolyte ke pH ko evaulate kara ja sakta hai ye approach as follows hai :

Step 1. Before dissociation jo species present hoti hai usse Brönsted-Lowry acids / bases ki terms meh identify kara jata hai.
Step 2. Sabhi possible reactions ke liye balanced equations i.e., with a species acting both as acid as well as base ko likha jata hai.
Step 3. Jis reaction ka higher Ka hota hai usse primary reaction ki tarah identify kara jata hai aur ab other reaction subsidiary reaction hota hai.
Step 4. Each species ki primary reaction meh following values ko tabular form meh enlist kara jata hai-
(a) Initial concentration, c.
(b) Change in concentration on proceeding to equilibrium in terms of α, degree of ionization.
(c) Equilibrium concentration.
Step 5. Equilibrium concentrations ko equilibrium constant equation for principal reaction meh substitute kara jata hai aur ab isse α find out karne ke liye solve kara jata hai.
Step 6. Ab principal reaction meh species ki concentration ko calculate kara jata hai.
Step 7. Calculate pH=log[H3O